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My Knitting Book.

Cover

My Knitting Book.

By
Miss Lambert,
(Authoress of the Hand-book of Needlework.)

LONDON:
JOHN MURRAY, ALBEMARLE STREET.
1843.

PRICE EIGHTEEN PENCE.

Titlepage

Richards,
100, St. Martin's Lane.

PREFACE.[iii]

The examples of knitting, contained in the following pages, have been selected with the greatest care,—many are original,—and the whole are so arranged as to render them comprehensible even to a novice in the art.

Knitting being so often sought, as an evening amusement, both by the aged and by invalids, a large and distinct type has been adopted,—as affording an additional facility. The writer feels confident in the recommendation of "My Knitting Book," and humbly hopes it may meet with the same liberal reception that has been accorded to her "Hand-Book of Needlework."[iv]

The numerous piracies that have been committed on her last mentioned work, have been one inducement to publish this little volume; and from the low price at which it is fixed, nothing, but a very extended circulation, can ensure her from loss. Some few of the examples have been selected from the chapter on knitting, in the "Hand-Book."

3, New Burlington Street,
November 1843.

CONTENTS.[v]

MY KNITTING BOOK.[9]

Explanation of Terms used in Knitting.

To cast on.—The first interlacement of the cotton on the needle.

To cast off.—To knit two stitches, and to pass the first over the second, and so on to the last stitch, which is to be secured by drawing the thread through.

To cast over.—To bring the cotton forward round the needle.

To narrow.—To lessen, by knitting two stitches together.

To seam.—To knit a stitch with the cotton before the needle.

To widen.—To increase by making a stitch,[10] bringing the cotton round the needle, and knitting the same when it occurs.

A turn.—Two rows in the same stitch, backwards and forwards.

To turn.—To change the stitch.

To turn over.—To bring the wool forward over the needle.

A row.—The stitches from one end of the needle to the other.

A round.—A row, when the stitches are on two, three, or more needles.

A plain row.—That composed of simple knitting.

To pearl a row.—To knit with the cotton before the needle.

To rib.—To work alternate rows of plain and pearl knitting.

To bring the thread forward.—To bring the cotton forward so as to make an open stitch.

A loop stitch.—Made by bringing the cotton[11] before the needle, which, in knitting the succeeding stitch, will again take its own place.

To slip or pass a stitch.—To change it from one needle to the other without knitting it.

To fasten on.—The best way to fasten on is to place the two ends contrariwise, and knit a few stitches with both together. For knitting, with silk, or fine cotton, a weaver's knot will be found the best.

To take under.—To pass the cotton from one needle to the other, without changing its position.

Pearl, seam, and rib-stitch—All signify the same.

N.B. The sizes of the needles are given according to the Standard Filière.

The following engraving represents the Standard Filière, or knitting and netting needle gauge, an instrument invented some time since by the authoress, and now in general use, by[12] which the different sizes of knitting and netting needles can be ascertained with the greatest accuracy.

The Standard Filière.

The Standard Filière.

It is necessary, in giving or following directions for knitting, to caution knitters to observe a medium in their work—not knitting either too loose or too tight.

[13]Siberian Cuffs.

Nine shades of German wool, used double, will be required.—No. 8 needles.

Cast on sixty-four stitches with the darkest shade;—knit three plain rows.

Fourth row—bring the wool forward, knit two together.

Repeat these four rows, (which form the pattern), nine times,—taking a lighter shade of wool each time.

A Knitted Silk Cuff.

Coarse black netting silk.—Four needles, No. 22. Cast on twenty-eight stitches on each of three needles:—knit two plain rounds.

Third round—bring the silk forward, slip one; knit one; pass the slipped stitch over it; knit one; pearl one.

Repeat the third round, until the cuff be of the depth required; then,—knit two plain rounds to correspond with the commencement.

Open Stitch for Cuffs.[14]

With coarse silk.—Four needles, No. 22.

Cast on any even number of stitches, on each of three needles.

First round—knit two together.

Second round—bring the silk forward, knit one.

Third round—plain knitting.

Repeat from the first round.

Very Pretty Cuffs.

Two colours are generally used—say red and white. They are prettiest in four-thread embroidery fleecy, or German wool.—Two needles No. 16, and two No. 20, will be required.

Cast on forty-six stitches.

Bring the wool forward, knit two together.

Knit six plain rows.

white.

Knit six plain rows.

Bring the wool forward, knit two together.

[15]Knit six plain rows.

red.

Knit six plain rows.

Bring the wool forward, knit two together.

Knit six plain rows.

white.

Knit six plain rows.

Bring the wool forward, knit two together.

Knit six plain rows.

red.

Knit six plain rows.

Bring the wool forward, knit two together.

white.

Take double wool, and needles double the size.

Knit one plain row.

Pearl one row.

Knit two plain rows.

Pearl one row.

Knit one row.

white.

Knit one plain row.

Pearl one row.

red.

Repeat these two red and white stripes, alternately, four times, and finish with the two stitches together, as at the commencement.[16]

The cuffs, when finished, roll over at the top.

Muffatees with two Colours.

German wool,—three needles, No. 25. The prettiest colours are cerise and brown;—commencing with the brown. Cast on eighty-eight stitches, viz.—thirty on each of two needles, and twenty-eight on the third.—Knit four rounds,—two stitches of each alternately pearl and plain.

Knit one plain round.

Pearl three rounds.

The above is all with one colour,—the brown.

Take off two stitches without knitting; knit six with the cerise.—Repeat, alternately, to the end of the round.

The next nine rounds are the same.

Knit one plain round with the brown.

Pearl three rounds.

Commence again with the cerise,—knitting[17] four stitches only at the beginning of the round;—then take off two stitches, and knit six, alternately, as before.

These cuffs may be worked to any desired length, finishing off the same as at the commencement.

Gentlemen's Muffatees.

Cast on fifty-four stitches, in double German wool.—No. 14 needles.

First row—bring the wool forward, slip one; knit two together.—Repeat.

Every row is the same,—the first and last stitches being plain. When finished they are to be sewn up.

Plain Ribbed Muffatees.

Four needles will be required.

Cast on each of three needles, eighteen or twenty-four stitches, according to the size desired.

[18]First round—knit three; pearl three;—alternately.

Second and succeeding rounds—repeat the first.

Another Pair of Muffatees.

Three-thread fleecy, or Zephyr wool.—No. 13 needles.

Cast on thirty-six stitches.

Knit twenty plain stitches, and sixteen in double knitting.

When they are sufficiently large, knit or sew them up. The double knitting comes over the hand, the plain knitting setting tight to the wrist.

Knitted Cuffs, Shell Pattern.

These may be made either with silk, cotton, or fine wool.—Needles No. 22.

Cast thirty stitches on each of two needles, and forty on a third;—knit one plain round.

[19]Second round—pearl one; pass the silk back, knit one; pearl one; bring the silk forward, knit one, by which you make a loop stitch;—repeat this five times, which, with the loop stitch, will make thirteen from the last pearled stitch. Commence the pattern again, as at beginning of round.

Third round—pearl one; knit one; pearl one; slip one; knit one, pass the slip-stitch over it; knit nine; knit two together.—Repeat to the end of the round.

Fourth round—same as third, except that there will be only seven plain stitches to knit.

Fifth round—same as third, with only five plain stitches.

There will now be the same number of stitches on the needles as at the commencement, viz.—seven for the shell part of the pattern, and three for the division.

Knit one plain round, except on the three division stitches, which are to be knitted as before.

[20]Commence again as at second round. When the cuffs are of sufficient length, knit a plain round to correspond with the beginning.

The prettiest way of knitting these cuffs will be to work the first pattern in cerise;—the next five in white; the next five, alternately in cerise and white; then five in white; and finish with one in cerise.

Double Knitted Cuffs.

These cuffs are prettiest in single German wool; two colours are required,—say claret and white. They will take sixteen skeins of white wool and eight of claret—No. 13 needles.

Cast on forty-six stitches in claret,—pearl four rows. Pearl one row white; in the next—bring the wool forward, knit two together:—repeat these two rows of white, twice,—making altogether six rows. The four rows of claret in pearl knitting, and the six rows of[21] white, are now to be repeated, alternately, until six stripes of each are worked. Then,—

Pick up seventy stitches in claret, on the right side, at one of the narrow ends, and pearl one row. Repeat the six rows of white,—finishing with the four rows of claret, and cast off.

Repeat the same at the other end of the cuff,—observing that the knitting of the frill is to be on the wrong side.

Sew up the cuffs, and double them, so as to allow the frill, at the one end, to appear above that at the other.

A Brioche[A].

The Brioche knitting-stitch is simply—bring the wool forward, slip one; knit two together.

A Brioche is formed of sixteen straight narrow stripes, and sixteen wide stripes, the latter [22]gradually decreasing in width towards the top or centre of the cushion. It may be made in three-thread fleecy, or double German wool, with ivory or wooden pins, No. 8.

Cast on ninety stitches, in black, for the narrow stripe; knit two turns;—then, three turns in gold colour, and two turns again in black. This completes the narrow stripe.

The conical stripe is knitted as follows:—bring the wool forward, knit two together, twice, and turn; knit these two, and two more of the black and turn; continue this,—taking each time two more stitches of the black, until within two stitches of the top, and turn; the wool will now be at the bottom or wide part of the stripe. Commence again with the black, as in the former narrow stripe, knitting the two black stitches at the top. It may be also as well to diminish the narrow stripes by turning when within two stitches of the top, in the centre row of gold colour.

[23]By a turn is meant one row and back again.

The colours for the conical stripes may be any two or four colours, which assort well together; or each may be different. When the last conical stripe is finished, it is to be knitted to the first narrow stripe.—The brioche is to be made up with a stiff bottom of mill board, about eight inches in diameter, covered with cloth. The top is drawn together, and fastened in the centre with a tuft of soft wool, or a cord and tassels. It should be stuffed with down or fine combed wool.

[A] So called from its resemblance, in shape, to the well known French cake of that name.

Fringe Pattern Knitting.

Cast on any even number of stitches, in German wool—No. 10 needles.

Turn the wool round the needle, bringing it in front again; knit two together, taken in front.

Every row is the same.

[24]An Opera Cap.

No. 10 needles—Double German wool, or three-thread fleecy.

Cast on eighty stitches,—white.

Pearl one row,

Knit one row,

white.

Pearl one row,—coloured. In the next row,—

Bring the wool before the needle, and knit two stitches together.

Pearl one row,

Knit one row,

white.

Pearl one row,

Knit one row,

white.

The above forms the border.

First division—coloured.

Pearl one row.

Knit one row, decreasing one stitch at each end.

Knit one row.

Knit a fancy row, by bringing the wool forward, and knitting two stitches together.

[25]Second—white.

Pearl one row, decreasing one stitch at each end.

Knit one row, decreasing two stitches at each end.

Knit one row, decreasing one stitch at each end.

Knit a fancy row as before.

Third—coloured.

Pearl one row, decreasing one stitch at each end.

Knit one row, decreasing one stitch at each end.

Knit one row, without decreasing.

Knit the fancy row as before.

Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, Seventh

The third division is to be repeated, alternately with white and coloured wool.

Eighth—white. Ninth—coloured.

In these two last divisions, only two stitches are to be decreased in each; this is to be done[26] in the row after the pearl,—decreasing one stitch at each end.

N.B. There should be forty-six stitches left on the needle in the last row.

Pick up thirty stitches on each side, and make the borders at the sides and back like that in front.

Make up the cap by turning in the border to the fancy row, and hem it all round: it is to be tied behind, and under the chin, with ribbons or plaited wool, with tassels of the same.

A Sontag, or Cephaline

The border for this cap is worked the same as the preceding,—casting on one hundred and two stitches;—single German wool;—No. 15 needles.

Knit one row in white, to bring the pearl on the right side. Then,[27]

With the darkest shade, bring the wool round the needle, pearl two together; pearl one.—Repeat to the end of the row.

In the next row—bring the wool forward, knit two together; knit one.—Repeat to the end of the row.

Knit forty-two rows in the same manner, taking in one stitch at the end of almost every row, so that the number of stitches in the last row is reduced to seventy-two, taking care to keep the pattern regular, and changing the colour every two rows.

Take up forty stitches, on each side, and knit one row of white round all the three sides: knit another row to make the pearl, and finish the border with white and coloured wool, as in the preceding cap. Finish with ribbons, or cords and tassels.

The border is knitted in white, and the middle shade of whatever colour is used in the head piece. This is prettiest in five distinct[28] shades of any colour, with one or two rows of white between each division of shade.

A Bonnet Cap.

Cast on ninety stitches, in hair-brown German wool, for border.—No. 16 needles.

First, second, and third rows—plain knitting.

Fourth row—bring the wool forward, knit two together. Then,—

Commence with another colour—say white.

Fifth, sixth, and seventh rows—plain knitting.

Eighth row—bring the wool forward, knit two together.

Repeat these last four rows seven times: then the brown border as before. They form a band of about four inches wide, which is to be drawn up at the two ends, and strings attached to tie it close to the chin.

Then, cast on forty stitches and commence[29] another band with the brown border as above,—three rows of the pattern in white, and repeat the brown border. This is to be sewn or knitted on to the head piece, and forms the band for the back. A ribbon is to be run through it, to tie it close to the head.

Double Knitting for Comforters, etc.

Large-sized needles, No. 1, and four-thread fleecy, will be required.

Cast on any even number of stitches.

First row—bring the wool forward, slip one; pass the wool back, knit one, turning the wool twice round the needle.—Repeat to the end of the row.

Every succeeding row is the same.—The stitch knitted in one row, is the slip-stitch in the next.

Knitted Lace.

Cast on twelve stitches with very fine cotton, or thread.—No. 25 needles.

[30]First row—slip one; knit two; pearl one; knit two together; turn the thread once round the needle, knit two; pearl one; knit one; turn the thread once round the needle, knit two, taken together at the back.

Second row—slip one; knit one; turn the thread twice round the needle, knit two; pearl two together; turn the thread once round the needle, knit one; pearl two together; turn the thread twice round the needle, pearl two together; knit one.

Third row—slip one; knit two; pearl one; knit two; turn the thread once round the needle, knit two together, taken at the back; knit one; knit two together; knit three.

Fourth row—slip one; turn the thread once round the needle; pearl one; knit two together; turn the thread once round the needle, knit four; pearl two together; turn the thread twice round the needle, pearl two together; knit one.[31]

Fifth row—slip one; knit two; pearl one; knit two; knit two together; turn the thread twice round the needle, knit three; pearl two together; knit one.

Sixth row—slip one; knit one, pass the slip-stitch over it; slip one; knit one, pass the slip-stitch over it; slip one; knit one, pass the slip-stitch over it; slip one; knit two; turn the thread once round the needle, pearl two together; turn the thread once round the needle, pearl two together; knit one; turn the thread twice round the needle, pearl two together; knit one.

There should now be twelve stitches on the needle as at the commencement.—Repeat from the first row.

Knitted Insertion.

Cast on nine stitches in fine cotton; No. 23 needles.

Slip one; knit two; bring the cotton forward, knit two together; knit one; bring[32] the cotton forward, knit two together; pearl one.—Repeat.

This may be used for trimming muslin curtains, etc.

Coral Trimming for a Muslin Dress.

Cast on two stitches.—No. 2 needles, rather short.

Turn the wool round the needle, so as to bring it in front again; knit the two stitches, take together in the front.

Every row is the same.

Barley-corn Stitch.

Cast on any uneven number of stitches, with eight-thread Zephyr fleecy, or double German wool, and No. 2 needles.

Slip the first stitch, keeping the wool in front of the needle; turn the wool round the needle, so as to bring it in front again; knit two together, taken in front. Continue turning[33] the wool round the needle, and knitting two together, to the end of the row. All the rows are the same.

The two stitches, which are to be taken together, appear always as if tied together.

A Muff, in colours of Sable.

Cast on seventy or eighty stitches.

First, second, and third rows—plain knitting.

Fourth row—bring the wool forward, knit two together, taken at the back.—Repeat to the end of the row.

Repeat these four rows, until the piece be about eighteen inches long, admitting that the shading comes in correctly.

Two No. 8 needles are required, and double German wool, in four distinct shades to match the colour of sable. Commence with the lightest shade,—then the second, third, and darkest, reversing them again to the lightest.

[34]Another Muff.

Cast on forty-five stitches.—No. 8 needles.

Every row is worked the same, with a slip-stitch at the beginning;—knit one; pearl one.—Repeat to the end of the row.

It will require a piece of about twenty inches long, to make a moderate sized muff, which should be lined with gros de Naples; and stuffed with wool, and a sufficient quantity of horse-hair to retain it in shape. Cord and tassels to match the colour of the muff, may be sewn at the ends; or it may be drawn up with ribbons.

Close Stitch for a Waistcoat, &c.

To be knitted in two colours,—say claret and blue.—No. 18 needles. German wool.

First row—with claret,—knit one; slip one.—Repeat to the end of the row.

Second row—with claret,—knit one; bring[35] the wool forward, slip one; pass the wool back, knit one.—Repeat to the end of the row.

Third row—with claret,—slip one; knit one.—Repeat to the end of the row.

Fourth row—with claret,—bring the wool forward, slip one; pass the wool back, knit one.—Repeat to the end of the row.

Fifth and sixth rows—same as first and second,—in blue.

Commence again, as at first row.

Long Sleeves to wear under the Dress.

No. 17 needles, and six-thread embroidery fleecy.

Cast on forty-two stitches very loosely, and alternately knit, and pearl, three stitches, for twelve turns.

Knit ten turns plain.

Knit thirty-five turns plain,—increasing one stitch at the beginning and end of each turn.

[36]Knit twenty turns, plain—increasing one stitch every other turn.

Repeat the twelve turns as at the commencement.

THE TWELVE FOLLOWING PATTERNS ARE INTENDED FOR D'OYLEYS, TIDIES, FISH OR BASKET NAPKINS; THEY ARE TO BE WORKED WITH NO. 14 KNITTING COTTON, AND NO. 19 NEEDLES.—THEY MAY ALSO BE ADAPTED, WITH A CHANGE OF MATERIAL, FOR SHAWLS, COUNTERPANES, BAGS, AND MANY OTHER ARTICLES.

I.
Leaf and Trellis Pattern.

Cast on any number of stitches that may be divided by twenty,—twenty stitches forming each pattern.

First row—pearl knitting.

Second row—knit five;(a) bring the thread forward, knit two together, three times; bring[37] the thread forward, knit two; knit two together; knit ten.—Repeat from (a).

Third row—pearl knitting.

Fourth row—knit six;(b) bring the thread forward, knit two together, three times; bring the thread forward, knit two; knit two together; knit five; knit two together; knit two; bring the thread forward, knit one.—Repeat from (b).

Fifth row—pearl knitting.

Sixth row—knit seven;(c) bring the thread forward, knit two together, three times; bring the thread forward, knit two; knit two together; knit three; knit two together; knit two; bring the thread forward, knit three.—Repeat from (c).

Seventh row—pearl knitting.

Eighth row—knit eight;(d) bring the thread forward, knit two together, three times; bring the thread forward, knit two; knit two together; knit one; knit two together; knit two;[38] bring the thread forward, knit five.—Repeat from (d).

Ninth row—pearl knitting.

Tenth row—knit nine;(e) bring the thread forward, knit two together, three times; bring the thread forward, knit two; slip one; knit two together, pass the slipped stitch over them; knit two; bring the thread forward, knit seven.—Repeat from (e).

Eleventh row—pearl knitting.

Twelfth row—(f) knit five; knit two together; knit two; bring the thread forward, knit two together, three times; bring the thread forward, knit one; bring the thread forward, knit two; knit two together.—Repeat from (f).

Thirteenth row—pearl knitting.

Fourteenth row—knit four;(g) knit two together; knit two; bring the thread forward, knit two together, three times; bring the thread forward, knit three; bring the thread forward,[39] knit two; knit two together; knit three.—Repeat from (g).

Fifteenth row—pearl knitting.

Sixteenth row—knit three;(h) knit two together; knit two; bring the thread forward, knit two together, three times; bring the thread forward, knit five; bring the thread forward, knit two; knit two together; knit one.—Repeat from (h).

Seventeenth row—pearl knitting.

Eighteenth row—knit two; knit two together;(i) knit two; bring the thread forward, knit two together, three times; bring the thread forward, knit seven; bring the thread forward, knit two; slip one; knit two together, pass the slipped stitch over them.—Repeat from (i).

Nineteenth row—pearl knitting.

Twentieth row—Commence again, as at fourth row.

[40]II.
Rose-leaf Pattern.

This pattern may be worked with any number of stitches that can be divided by ten, adding three stitches,—one for the symmetry of the pattern, and two for the borders.

N.B. The termination of each row must be exactly the same (reversed) as the commencement.

Cast on forty-three stitches; pearl one row.

First row—knit one;(a) pearl one; knit two together; knit two; bring the thread forward, knit one; bring the thread forward, knit two; knit two together.—Repeat from (a).

Second row—knit one;(b) knit one; pearl two together; pearl one; bring the thread forward, turning it round the needle, pearl three; turn the thread round the needle, pearl one; pearl two together.—Repeat from (b).

Third row—knit one;(c) pearl one; knit two together; bring the thread forward, knit[41] five; bring the thread forward, knit two together.—Repeat from (c).

Fourth row—knit one; pearl two together;(d) bring the thread forward, turning it round the needle, pearl seven; bring the thread forward, turning it round the needle, pearl three together.—Repeat from (d).

Fifth row—knit two; bring the thread forward, knit two; knit two together; repeat, as in first row, from (a).

Sixth row—knit one; pearl two; bring the thread forward, turning it round the needle, pearl one; pearl two together; repeat, as in second row, from (b).

Seventh row—knit four; bring the thread forward, knit two together; repeat, as in third row, from (c).

Eighth row—knit one; pearl four; bring the thread forward, turning it round the needle, pearl three together; repeat, as in fourth row, from (d).

[42]Ninth row—Commence again, as at first row.

III.
Point Pattern.

Cast on six stitches for each pattern, and two over for the edge.

First row—Knit two;(a) knit two together; bring the thread forward, knit one; bring the thread forward, knit two together; knit one.—Repeat from (a).

Second row—plain knitting.

Third row—knit two together; knit one;(b) bring the thread forward, knit three; bring the thread forward, knit three together.—Repeat from (b).—At the end of this row, plain knit the two last stitches.

Fourth row—plain knitting.

Fifth row—knit two;(c) bring the thread forward, knit two together; knit one; knit two[43] together; bring the thread forward, knit one.—Repeat from (c).

Sixth row—plain knitting.

Seventh row—knit three; bring the thread forward, knit three together; bring the thread forward.—Repeat.—At the end of this row, bring the thread forward, knit two.

Eighth row—plain knitting.

IV.
Gothic Pattern.

Cast on any number of stitches that can be divided by ten.—Knit four plain rows.

Fifth row—knit one; bring the thread forward, knit three;(a) slip one; knit two together, pass the slipped stitch over them; knit three; bring the thread forward, knit one; bring the thread forward, knit three.—Repeat from (a).

Sixth row—pearl knitting.

[44]Repeat the fifth and sixth rows three times, and commence again with the four plain rows.

V.
Scotch Pattern.

Cast on seven stitches for each pattern.

First row—knit two; knit two together; bring the thread forward, knit one; bring the thread forward, knit two together.—Repeat.

Second row—plain knitting.

Third row—knit one;(a) knit two together; bring the thread forward, knit three; bring the thread forward, knit two together.—Repeat from (a).

Fourth row—plain knitting.

Fifth row—knit two; bring the thread forward, knit two together; knit one; knit two together; bring the thread forward.—Repeat.

Sixth row—plain knitting.

Seventh row—knit two; bring the thread forward, knit two together; knit one; knit[45] two together; bring the thread forward.—Repeat.

Eighth row—plain knitting.

Ninth row—knit two; bring the thread forward, knit two together; knit one; knit two together; bring the thread forward.—Repeat.

Tenth row—plain knitting.

Eleventh row—knit three; bring the thread forward, knit three together; bring the thread forward, knit one.—Repeat.

Twelfth row—plain knitting.

Thirteenth row—knit three; knit two together; bring the thread forward, knit three.—Repeat.

Fourteenth row—plain knitting.

Commence again, as at first row.

VI.
Chevron Pattern.

Cast on any number of stitches that can be divided by eight.

[46]First row—pearl knitting.

Second row—knit two together; knit three; bring the thread forward, knit three.—Repeat.

Repeat these two rows twice,—making in all six rows.

The pattern, as above worked, turns to the left; in the next six rows it should turn to the right,—this is to be done by bringing the thread forward before the open stitch of the preceding row.

Commence again as at first row, knitting alternately six rows with the pattern to the left, and six rows with the pattern to the right.

VII.
Vandyke Pattern.

Cast on any number of stitches that can be divided by ten.

First row—pearl knitting.

Second row—plain knitting.

[47]Third row—pearl knitting.

Fourth row—bring the thread forward, knit two; knit two together; pearl one; knit two together; knit two; bring the thread forward, knit one.—Repeat.

Commence again, as at first row.

VIII.
Lace Pattern.

Cast on any number of stitches that can be divided by six.

First row—knit one; knit two together; bring the thread forward, knit one; bring the thread forward, knit two together.—Repeat.

Second row—pearl knitting.

Repeat the two first rows, four times,—making altogether ten rows.

Eleventh row—knit two together;(a) bring the thread forward, knit three; bring the thread forward, knit three in one, (by slipping the first[48] stitch, knitting the second, and passing the slip-stitch over the knitted one; then passing the last stitch off the right hand needle on to the left hand needle, and slipping the second stitch over the first, and passing the stitch back again on to the right-hand needle).—Repeat from (a).

Twelfth row—pearl knitting.

Thirteenth row—knit one; bring the thread forward, knit two together; knit one; knit two together; bring the thread forward.—Repeat.—Finish this row by bringing the thread forward, and knitting two together, to prevent its decreasing.

Fourteenth row—pearl knitting.

Repeat the two last rows four times.

Twenty-third row—knit two;(b) bring the thread forward, knit three in one (as before); bring the thread forward, knit three.—Repeat from (b).

Commence again, as at first row.

[49]IX.
Fish-bone Pattern.

Cast on any uneven number of stitches.

First row—Slip one; knit one;(a) bring the thread forward, slip one, taking it in front; knit one, pass the slip-stitch over it; knit two.—Repeat from (a).—There will be three plain stitches to knit at the end of the row.

Second row—Slip one;(b) turn the thread round the needle, and bring it in front again; pearl two together; pearl two.—Repeat from (b).

X.
German Pattern.

Cast on twenty-one stitches for each pattern.

First row—pearl knitting.

Second row—knit two together; knit three; knit two together; knit one; bring the thread forward, knit one; bring the thread forward, knit one; knit two together; knit three; knit[50] two together; knit one; bring the thread forward, knit one; bring the thread forward, knit two.—Repeat.

Third row—pearl knitting.

Fourth row—knit two together; knit one; knit two together; knit one; bring the thread forward, knit three; bring the thread forward, knit one; knit two together; knit one; knit two together; knit one; bring the thread forward, knit three; bring the thread forward, knit two.—Repeat.

Fifth row—pearl knitting.

Sixth row—slip one; knit two together, pass the slip-stitch over them; knit one; bring the thread forward, knit five; bring the thread forward, knit one; slip one; knit two together, pass the slip-stitch over them; knit one; bring the thread forward, knit five; bring the thread forward, knit two.—Repeat.

Seventh row—pearl knitting.

Eighth row—knit two; bring the thread[51] forward, knit one; bring the thread forward, knit one; knit two together; knit three; knit two together; knit one; bring the thread forward, knit one; bring the thread forward, knit one; knit two together; knit three; knit two together—Repeat.

Ninth row—pearl knitting.

Tenth row—knit two; bring the thread forward, knit three; bring the thread forward, knit one; knit two together; knit one; knit two together; knit one; bring the thread forward, knit three; bring the thread forward, knit one; knit two together; knit one; knit two together.—Repeat.

Eleventh row—pearl knitting.

Twelfth row—knit two; bring the thread forward, knit five; bring the thread forward, knit one; slip one; knit two together, pass the slip-stitch over them; knit one; bring the thread forward, knit five; bring the thread forward, knit one; slip one; knit two together,[52] pass the slip-stitch over them.—Repeat.

Commence again, as at first row.

XI.
Diamond Pattern.

Cast on eight stitches for each pattern.

First row—bring the thread forward, knit one; bring the thread forward, knit two together; knit three; knit two together.—Repeat.

Second row—pearl knitting.

Third row—bring the thread forward, knit three; bring the thread forward, knit two together; knit one; knit two together.—Repeat.

Fourth row—pearl knitting.

Fifth row—bring the thread forward, knit five; bring the thread forward, slip one; knit two together, pass the slip-stitch over them.—Repeat.

Sixth row—pearl knitting.

Seventh row—knit two together; knit[53] three; knit two together; bring the thread forward, knit one; bring the thread forward.—Repeat.

Eighth row—pearl knitting.

Ninth row—knit two together; knit one; knit two together; bring the thread forward, knit three; bring the thread forward.—Repeat.

Tenth row—pearl knitting.

Eleventh row—bring the thread forward, knit three; bring the thread forward, knit two together; knit one; knit two together.—Repeat.

Commence again, from fourth row.

XII.
Shell Pattern.

Cast on twenty-five stitches for each pattern.

First row—knit two together, four times; bring the thread forward, knit one, eight times; knit two together, four times; pearl one.—Repeat.

[54]Second row—pearl knitting.

Third row—plain knitting.

Fourth row—pearl knitting.

Commence again, as at first row.

Cable Knitting.

Cast on any number of stitches that can be divided by six, in German wool—No. 18 needles.

First row—pearl knitting.

Second row—plain knitting.

Third row—pearl knitting.

Fourth row—plain knitting.

Fifth row—pearl knitting.

Sixth row—plain knitting.

Seventh row—pearl knitting.

Eighth row—Slip three stitches on to a third needle, always keeping that needle in front; knit the next three stitches; then knit the three stitches that were slipped on the third[55] needle; take the third needle again, and slip three more stitches on it, keeping it as before in front, and knit the next three stitches; then knit the three stitches slipped on the third needle; continue the same to the end of the row.

Commence again, as at first row.

A Purse.

Cast on one hundred stitches.—No. 20 needles.

First row—slip one; knit one, pass the slip-stitch over it; bring the silk forward, knit one; bring the silk forward, pearl one.—Repeat to the end of the row.

Every succeeding row is the same.

Three skeins of coarse netting silk are required. It forms a strong gentleman's purse.

Pretty Stitch for a Purse.

Cast on any even number of stitches, with middle-sized netting silk.—No. 22 needles.

[56]First row—plain knitting.

Second row—knit two together.—The first and last stitches in this row are to be knitted plain.

Third row—make one between each stitch, by taking up the silk between the stitches of the preceding row, except between the two last stitches.

Fourth row—plain knitting.

Fifth row—pearl knitting.

Repeat from second row.

A Pence Jug, or Purse.

Five needles, No. 20, with claret and green German wool.

Commence with the handle;—by casting on four stitches in claret, and knitting, in plain rows backwards and forwards, until it be two inches long.

Cast on six stitches on the same needle,[57] twenty-six on the second, and ten on the third: then,—

Knit from the first needle,—knit two; pearl two; alternately.

With the second needle—pearl two; knit two; pearl two; pass the wool back, slip one; knit one, pass the slip-stitch over it; knit the remaining stitches plain, within seven of the end; then,—knit two together; knit one; pearl two; knit two.

On the next needle—pearl two; knit two; alternately,—repeating three rounds, until twelve stitches only remain on the second needle, which finishes the spout.

Knit three rounds,—every two stitches, alternately pearled and plain.

Knit five rounds—green

Knit three rounds—claret

Knit five rounds—green

every two stitches
alternately pearled
and plain.

Knit one plain round, and pearl three rounds,—in claret.

[58]Knit one plain round, bringing the wool forward between every two stitches.

Pearl three rounds. Knit one plain round. In the next two rounds,—bring the wool forward, knit two together. Then,—

Knit one plain round with claret; pearl three rounds; knit one plain round; in the next two rounds, bring the wool forward and knit two together; knit one plain round; pearl three rounds. Divide the stitches on the four needles,—twelve on each. Then,—

In plain stocking knitting, knit five rounds, decreasing one alternately, at each end, and in the middle of the needle. Knit three rounds more, decreasing occasionally.

Divide the stitches on three needles; knit a plain round, and pearl three rounds without decreasing; finish with plain rounds, decreasing until only four stitches remain on each needle. Draw up the small opening and attach the[59] lower end of the handle to the side of the jug.

It may also be worked in silk.

A Strong Purse.

Cast on any number of stitches that can be divided by three.—No. 22 needles.

First row—bring the wool forward, slip one; knit two, pass the slip-stitch over them.—Repeat to the end of the row.

Second row—plain knitting.

Third row—knit two, before the pattern is commenced, that the holes may come in a diagonal direction.

Fourth and Fifth rows—same as second and third.

Sixth row—same as first.

This purse will take five skeins of second-sized netting silk. It particularly requires stretching.

[60]A pretty open Stitch for a Purse.

Four skeins of fine purse-silk, and four needles, No. 23, will be required.

Cast on twenty stitches on each of three needles.

First round—plain knitting.

Second round—bring the silk forward, knit two together.

Repeat the above two rounds four times.

Eleventh round—plain knitting.—Pass the last stitch of this round, after it is knitted, on to the next needle.

Twelfth round—commence by knitting two together, before bringing the silk forward;—this change causes the pattern to assume a kind of vandyke form. Pass the last stitch of each needle of this round, on to the next needle.

Repeat the two last rounds four times;—commence again as at first round, working alternately the ten rounds of each pattern, until the[61] opening of the purse be required to be made; this is to be worked in rows backwards and forwards, like the first ten rounds, in order to keep the edges even. The other end is then to be made like the first.

Open Stitch Purse with Beads.

Second-size purse twist, and needles No. 20, are required.

Cast on sixty stitches in netting silk.

First row—knit one; bring the silk forward, knit two together; bring the silk forward, pass on a bead, placing it behind the needle; knit two together.—Continue the same to the end of the row, placing a bead every alternate pattern.

Second row—same as the first, without beads.

Third row—knit one; bring the silk forward, pass on a bead; then,—continue as in first row.

[62]A Purse in fine Silk.

Cast on three stitches, for each pattern.—No. 23 needles.

First row—bring the silk forward, knit two together; knit one.—Repeat.

Second row—bring the silk forward, pearl two together; pearl one.—Repeat.

Herringbone, or Shetland Stitch for a Purse.

Cast on any number of stitches that can be divided by four.—No. 20 needles. About eighty stitches will be required.

First row—bring the silk forward, slip one; knit one, pass the slip-stitch over it; knit one; bring the silk forward, pearl one.—Repeat to the end of the row.

Every row is the same.

Three skeins of second-sized silk will be required.

[63]THE FIVE FOLLOWING PATTERNS WILL BE FOUND VERY PRETTY FOR BAGS;—THEY SHOULD BE KNITTED WITH SECOND-SIZED PURSE TWIST,—NO. 24 NEEDLES.

I.
Diagonal Check Pattern Bag.

Cast on eight stitches for each pattern.

First round—pearl one; bring the silk forward, slip one; knit one, pass the slip-stitch over it; knit four; pearl one.—Repeat.

Second round—pearl one; knit six; pearl one.—Repeat.

Third round—pearl one; knit one; bring the silk forward, slip one; knit one, pass the slip-stitch over it; knit three; pearl one.—Repeat.

Fourth round—Repeat the second.

Fifth round—pearl one; knit two; bring the silk forward, slip one; knit one, pass the slip-stitch over it; knit two; pearl one.—Repeat.

Sixth round—Repeat the second.

[64]Seventh round—pearl one; knit three; bring the silk forward, slip one; knit one, pass the slip-stitch over it; knit one; pearl one.—Repeat.

Eighth round—Repeat the second.

Commence again, as at first row.

II.
Lozenge pattern Bag.

Cast on thirteen stitches for each pattern.

First round—pearl two; knit four; bring the silk forward, slip one; knit two together, pass the slip-stitch over them; bring the silk forward, knit four.—Repeat.

Second round—pearl two; knit two; knit two together; bring the silk forward, knit three; bring the silk forward, knit two together, taken at the back.—Repeat.

Third round—pearl two; knit one; knit two together; bring the silk forward, knit[65] five; bring the silk forward, knit two together, taken at the back; knit one.—Repeat.

Fourth round—pearl two; knit two together; bring the silk forward, knit three; bring the silk forward, knit two together; knit two; bring the silk forward, knit two together, taken at the back.—Repeat.

Fifth round—pearl two; knit two; bring the silk forward, knit two together, taken at the back; knit three; knit two together; bring the silk forward, knit two.—Repeat.

Sixth round—pearl two; knit three; bring the silk forward, knit two together, taken at the back; knit one; knit two together; bring the silk forward, knit three.—Repeat.

Commence again, as at first row.

III.
Hem-stitch Pattern Bag.

Cast on thirteen stitches for each pattern.

First round—knit two; bring the silk forward,[66] knit two together; knit one; bring the silk forward, knit two together; pearl one; bring the silk forward, slip one; knit one, pass the slip-stitch over it; pearl three.—Repeat.

Second round—knit two together; bring the silk forward, knit one; knit two together; bring the silk forward, knit two; pearl two; bring the silk forward, slip one; knit one, pass the slip stitch over it; pearl two.—Repeat.

Third round—knit two; bring the silk forward, knit two together; knit one; bring the silk forward, knit two together; pearl three; bring the silk forward, slip one; knit one, pass the slip-stitch over it; pearl one.—Repeat.

Fourth round—knit two together; bring the silk forward, knit one; knit two together; bring the silk forward, knit two; pearl four; bring the silk forward, slip one; knit one, pass the slip-stitch over it.—Repeat.

Fifth round—knit two; bring the silk forward, knit two together; knit one; bring the[67] silk forward, knit two together; pearl six.—Repeat.

Sixth round—knit two together; bring the silk forward, knit one; knit two together; bring the silk forward, knit two; pearl one; bring the silk forward, slip one; knit one, pass the slip-stitch over it; pearl three.—Repeat.

Seventh round—knit two; bring the silk forward, knit two together; knit one; bring the silk forward, knit two together; pearl two; bring the silk forward, slip one; knit one, pass the slip-stitch over it; pearl two.—Repeat.

Eighth round—knit two together; bring the silk forward, knit one; knit two together; bring the silk forward, knit two; pearl three; bring the silk forward, slip one; knit one, pass the slip-stitch over it; pearl one.—Repeat.

Ninth round—knit two; bring the silk forward, knit two together; knit one; bring the silk forward, knit two together; pearl[68] four; bring the silk forward, slip one; knit one, pass the slip-stitch over it.—Repeat.

Tenth round—knit two together; bring the silk forward, knit one; knit two together; bring the silk forward, knit two; pearl six.—Repeat.

Commence again, as at first row.

IV.
Spider Pattern Bag.

Cast on any number of stitches that can be divided by six.

First round—bring the silk forward, slip one; knit two together, pass the slip-stitch over them; bring the silk forward, knit three.—Repeat.

Second round—plain knitting.

Third round—bring the silk forward, knit two together, twice; knit two.—Repeat.

Fourth round—plain knitting.

Fifth round—bring the silk forward, knit[69] three; bring the silk forward, slip one; knit two together, pass the slip-stitch over them.—Repeat.

Commence again, as at first round.

V.
Stripe Pattern Bag.

Cast on six stitches for each pattern.

First round—turn the silk round the needle, pearl three; bring the silk forward, slip one; knit two together, pass the slip-stitch over them.—Repeat.

Second, Third, and Fourth rounds—alternately pearl three and knit three.

Commence again, as at first round.

A Bag, with Black or Garnet Beads.

No. 20 needles, eight skeins of netting silk, and four bunches of beads, including those for the fringe, will be required.

Thread half a bunch of beads on a skein of[70] claret netting silk, and cast on eighty-eight stitches.

First and second rows—plain knitting, without beads.

Third row—slip one; knit one with a bead; knit one.—Repeat the same, alternately, to the end of the row.

Repeat from first row, eighty-four times. Observe at the commencement of every row to make a slip-stitch.

Join up the two sides, leaving an opening at the top, and finish with two bars and a gold chain. A fringe of the garnet beads, with gold points, is the prettiest trimming. It should have a stiff lining.

Knitted Fringe.

This may be made of any sized wool or cotton, according to the purpose for which it is required; it may also be spaced with two or[71] more colours, working alternately six rows in each.

Cast on eight stitches.

Knit two; bring the wool forward, knit two together; knit one; bring the wool forward, knit two together; knit one.

When a sufficient number of rows are knitted to form the length of fringe desired,—

Cast off five stitches, leaving three to unravel for the fringe.

With four-thread fleecy, No. 10 needles may be used.

Vandyke Border.

This border is generally knitted in cotton, and may be used for muslin curtains, for knitted or netted fish napkins, and for "tidies" for the backs of chairs, or ends of sofas.

Cast on seven stitches, on No. 17 needles.

First and second rows—plain knitting.

Third row—slip one; knit two; turn over,[72] knit two together; turn over twice, knit two together.

Fourth row—bring the thread forward, knit two; pearl one; knit two; turn over, knit two together; knit one.

Fifth row—slip one; knit two; turn over, knit two together; knit four.

Sixth row—knit six; turn over, knit two together; knit one.

Seventh row—slip one; knit two; turn over, knit two together; turn over twice, knit two together; turn over twice, knit two together.

Eighth row—knit two; pearl one; knit two; pearl one; knit two; turn over, knit two together; knit one.

Ninth row—slip one; knit two; turn over, knit two together; turn over twice, knit two together; turn over twice, knit two together; turn over twice, knit two together.

Tenth row—knit two; pearl one; knit two;[73] pearl one; knit two; pearl one; knit two; turn over, knit two together; knit one.

Eleventh row—slip one; knit two; turn over, knit two together; knit nine.

Twelfth row—cast off all but seven; knit four; turn over, knit two together; knit one.

This finishes the first vandyke.—Commence again, as at third row.

A warm Half-square Shawl.

Four-thread fleecy, or eight-thread Zephyr fleecy, of two colours, say rose and white.—No. 8 needles.

Cast on one stitch, rose colour, and increase at the beginning of every other row, until there are ten stitches on the needle. In the next row—knit seven stitches for the border, which is throughout in plain knitting; join on the white wool, and pearl three, increasing on the last stitch.

In the next row—bring the wool forward,[74] slip one; knit two, pass the slipped stitch over them; knit the remaining white stitch plain; knit the seven stitches for the border, twisting the two colours in the changing of them.

In the next row—knit the seven stitches for the border; pearl the white, increasing at the end as before.

Repeat the two last rows, which comprise the whole pattern, until the shawl is of the required size, and finish with the plain knitted border, to correspond with the other side.

N.B. In the fancy row of the white, when uneven stitches occur at the end of the row, they are to be knitted plain.

A warm Double Knitted Scarf, in Two Colours.

Cast on thirty-six stitches in blue six-thread fleecy.—No. 2 needles.

First row—bring the wool forward, slip one; pass the wool back, knit one, turning the wool[75] twice round the needle.—Repeat to the end of the row.

Each succeeding row is the same, observing that the knit-stitch always comes over the slip-stitch.

It will require seven rows of blue, seven of white, seven of blue, thirty-eight of white, seven of blue, seven of white, and seven of blue.

Cast off and draw up the ends. Finish with blue and white tassels.

A Border for a Shawl or Quilt.

This border should be knitted separate, with the same sized needles and wool as the shawl or quilt, and afterwards sewn on.

Cast on any even number of stitches.

First row—Bring the wool forward, knit two together.

Second row—plain knitting.

Repeat these two rows alternately.

[76]Raised Knitting for a Shawl.

Two No. 19 and one No. 13 needles should be used.

Cast on any even number of stitches, that may be required, with German wool.

First row—with the small needle, alternately make one stitch, and knit two stitches together.

Second row—plain knitting, with large needle.

Third row—plain knitting, with small needle.

Fourth row—pearl knitting, with small needle.

Repeat, from the first row.

This kind of knitting is also well adapted for hoods, muffs, cuffs, etc. It is very pretty for a shawl in stripes,—knitting three patterns alternately of each colour. For a shawl, one yard and a half square, about three hundred and sixty stitches would be required.

[77]A Russian Shawl, in Brioche Stitch.

German wool.—No. 9 needles.

For a shawl one yard and a half square, about three hundred and sixty stitches will be required.—Five shades each, of two different colours, turned back, with the lightest in the centre, knitting two rows of each shade, look very well.—The following are good colours,—scarlet and stone colour,—blue and brown,—lilac and red brown,—lilac and white.

The Brioche-stitch is simply—bring the wool forward, slip one; knit two together.

A light Stitch for a Shawl.

Three-thread fleecy.—No. 10 needles.

Cast on any even number of stitches.—Bring the wool forward, knit two together, alternately, to the end of the row. Every row is the same.

[78]Star Pattern Shawl, in Two Colours.

Cast on four stitches in blue Zephyr wool, or four-thread fleecy.—No. 6 needles.

First row—bring the wool forward, knit one,—(these two stitches form the increase, and therefore are not to be repeated); bring the wool forward, slip one; knit two, pass the slip-stitch over them.—Repeat the same to the end of the row.

Second row—pearl knitting in claret.

Third row—the same as first,—in blue.

Fourth row—the same as second,—in claret.

Repeat these rows alternately, in blue and claret, until there are one hundred and eighty stitches on the needle; cast off, and finish with a netted fringe.

As the increasing adds an irregular stitch, some rows will have one, and others two knitted stitches, at their commencement.

[79]Barège Knitting for Shawls.

Commence with any number of stitches that may be divided by three.—No. 4 needles, finest Lady Betty's wool.—Knit one plain row.

Second row—bring the wool forward, knit three; bring the wool forward, knit three together, taking them off at the back.

Third row—pearl knitting.

Fourth row—bring the wool forward, knit three together, taking them off at the back; bring the wool forward, knit three.

Fifth row—pearl knitting.

Repeat from the second row.

When a pattern, in one or more colours, is to be introduced, break off the ground colour, and fasten on the colour next to be used, in the following manner.—Having made a slip knot in the end of the wool, pass it on the needle in the left hand: twist the end of the coloured wool and that of the ground, together,—knit,[80] in plain knitting, the stitches required for the pattern, then fasten off, by making a loop, and commence again with the ground colour,—fastening on again as above. Any number of colours may thus be introduced, to form flowers or other patterns, which, however, are always to be done in plain knitting.

A Shetland Knitted Scarf.

Commence with the pattern for the border, by casting on one hundred stitches for the width of the scarf.—No. 7 needles, and four-thread embroidery, or Lady Betty's wool.

First row—knit two stitches together, four times; bring the wool forward, knit one, eight times; knit two stitches together, four times; pearl one.—Repeat to the end of the row.

Second row—pearl knitting.

Third row—plain knitting.

Fourth row—pearl knitting.

[81]Repeat from the first row, until the pattern be about fourteen inches deep. Commence the centre as follows:—working one row of pearl knitting, before the pattern commences.

First row—bring the wool forward, slip one; knit one, pass the slip stitch over it; knit one; pearl one.—Repeat to the end of the row.

Second and following rows—repeat the first,—every row being alike.

If the wool be split, it exactly imitates the Shetland wool. In splitting, the wool will frequently break; but this is not important, as by laying the ends contrariwise, and twisting them together, a few stitches may be so knit, that the joins are not perceptible.

Both ends of the scarf are to be made alike, by reversing the knitting of the border. They may be finished with a tied, knitted, or netted fringe, of the same wool, without splitting, or of fine German wool.

[82]Shetland Pattern for a Shawl.

This should be worked in Lady Betty's wool, or four-thread embroidery fleecy, with No. 6 or 8 needles.

Cast on any number of stitches that may be divided by six.

First row—bring the wool forward, knit one; bring the wool forward, knit one;—slip one; knit two together, pass the slip-stitch over them; knit one.

Second row—pearl knitting.

Third row—bring the wool forward, knit three; bring the wool forward, slip one; knit two together, pass the slip-stitch over them.

Fourth row—pearl knitting.

Fifth row—knit one; slip one; knit two together, pass the slip-stitch over them; knit one; bring the wool forward, knit one; bring the wool forward.

Sixth row—pearl knitting.

[83]Seventh row—slip one; knit two together, pass the slip-stitch over them; bring the wool forward, knit three; bring the wool forward.

Eighth row—pearl knitting.

N.B. There are to be two plain stitches at the beginning and end of each row, to form an edge.

Other Patterns for Shawls.

With fine Shetland, or Lady Betty's wool, and No. 10 needles, most beautiful shawls may be knitted from the Leaf and Trellis Pattern (page 36), Point Pattern (page 42), Scotch Pattern (page 44), or Lace Pattern (page 47).

Double Diamond Stitch for a Quilt.

This is prettiest in stripes of about five inches in width, in any two colours.

Cast on any number of stitches that can be divided by three, allowing two over, for a stitch at each end of the row.

[84]First row—plain knitting.

Second row—slip one;(a) bring the wool forward, slip one; knit two together.—Repeat from (a).—Plain knit the last stitch.

Third row—slip one; knit one; the next stitch is a double stitch (that is,—a stitch and a loop)—knit the stitch and slip the loop;—continue to knit the stitch and slip the loop, to the end of the row.

Fourth row—commence again, as at second row.

In every other second row, there will be a double stitch after the first one,—this is to be knitted without bringing the wool forward. All the other stitches are to be knitted the same as before.

N.B. The last stitch of every row is to be knitted plain.

A Quilt.

This may be knitted as a Baby's Quilt, or it[85] may be done in small squares for a large Quilt.—Eight-thread Zephyr fleecy.—No. 6 needles.

Cast on any number of stitches that can be divided by three,—for a square of six inches, say forty-five; for a Baby's Quilt, two hundred and thirty-one.

First row—slip one; knit two, taken together in the front;(a) turn the wool round the needle, and bring it again in front; slip one; knit two together.—Repeat from (a).

Every row is alike.

N.B. The two last stitches at the end of the row are to be—the first pearled,—the second knitted.

A light and warm Counterpane.

Six-thread fleecy in two colours—say blue and white; or, what is preferable, German quilt wool—Needles No. 2, pointed at both ends.

Cast on any number of stitches in blue.

[86]First row—plain knitting, turning the wool twice round the needle.

Second row—join on the white wool, knit one; knit two together, turning the wool twice round the needle;—continue knitting two together, and turning the wool twice round the needle, to the end of the row, but plain knit the last stitch.

Third row—commence at the other end of the needle; knit two stitches taken together in front, twisting the wool twice round the needle.

Fourth row—white,—knit one; knit two together, turning the wool twice round the needle; knit one.

Fifth row—commence again as at third row.

Cross Stitch Pattern for a Quilt.

Two colours,—say gold colour and white.—No. 3 needles, pointed at both ends.—Cast on any number of stitches.

[87]First row—white,—knit one plain stitch, turning the wool twice round the needle.—Repeat to the end of the row.

Second row—gold colour,—joining on the colour where the last row of white commenced;—knit one plain stitch, turning the wool once round the needle; knit the long stitch and the one that was knitted in the last row together, turning the wool twice round the needle.—Repeat to the end of the row,—when one stitch will be left, which is to be knitted the same as the plain stitch at the beginning of the row.

Third row—white,—knit two together, taken in the front, turning the wool twice round the needle.—Repeat to the end of the row.

Fourth row—gold colour,—the same as the third,—knitting one plain stitch at the commencement of the row, and one plain stitch at the end of the row, twisting the wool once round the needle.

Fifth row—white,—knit two together,[88] twisting the wool twice round the needle.—Repeat to the end of the row.

Sixth row—Commence again, as at second row.

It may be as well to remark, that two rows are knitted at the back, and two at the front.

Another Quilt.

This should be knitted in stripes of six inches in width.—Cast on any number of stitches that may be divided by three;—German quilt wool.—No. 1 needles.

First row—bring the wool forward, slip one; knit two, pass the slip-stitch over them.—Repeat.

Second row—pearl knitting.

Third row—knit two, before the pattern is commenced, that the holes may come in a diagonal direction.

Fourth row—pearl knitting.

Fifth row—same as third.

[89]A Quilt, or Couvre-Pied, in squares.

This may be worked with Zephyr fleecy,—No. 9 needles, each piece being about three and a half inches square. Every square is worked in two colours,—as blue and white; lilac and white; gold colour and white; green and white; etc. These pieces are afterwards to be joined together, arranging them, according to their several colours. Each square, however, if preferred, may be worked the same. The following directions are for a square in green and white:—

First row—bring the wool forward, knit one,—in green. Work five more rows, in the same manner, when there should be seven stitches on the needle.

Seventh row—bring the wool forward, knit two,—in green; join on the white,—knit three;—join on another length of green,—knit two.

[90]Eighth row—bring the green wool forward, knit two; pearl three, white; knit three, green.

Ninth, and Tenth rows—knit to the end of each row, with green, increasing at the beginning, as before.

Eleventh row—bring the wool forward, knit two, green; knit seven, white; knit two, green.

Twelfth row—bring the wool forward, knit two, green; pearl seven, white; knit three, green.

Thirteenth, and Fourteenth rows—knit to the end of each row, with green, increasing, as before.

Fifteenth row—bring the wool forward, knit two, green; knit eleven, white; knit two, green.

Sixteenth row—bring the wool forward, knit two, green; pearl eleven, white; knit three, green.

Seventeenth, and Eighteenth rows—same as thirteenth and fourteenth.—There should now be nineteen stitches on the needle,—one[91] half of the square being completed. The decreasing then commences as follows:—

Nineteenth row—slip one, knit two together, knit one, green; knit eleven, white; knit four green.

Twentieth row—slip one, knit two together, knit one, green; pearl eleven, white; knit three, green.

Twenty-first, and twenty-second rows—green—decreasing at the beginning of each row.

Twenty-third row—slip one, knit two together, knit one, green; knit seven, white; knit four, green.

Twenty-fourth row—slip one, knit two together, knit one, green; pearl seven, white; knit three, green.

Twenty-fifth, and twenty-sixth rows—green,—decreasing, as before.

Twenty-seventh row—slip one, knit two together, knit one, green; knit three, white; knit four, green.

[92]Twenty-eighth row—slip one, knit two together, knit one, green; pearl three, white; knit three, green.

The white is now done with. The square is to be finished with plain rows of green,—decreasing, at the commencement of each.

A Cover for an Air Pillow.

Cast eighty stitches on each of three needles, No. 9.—Three-thread fleecy.

First round—bring the wool forward, knit one.—Repeat.

Second round—slip one; knit one, pass the slip stitch over it.—Repeat.

Repeat the first and second rounds, alternately.

A Baby's Hood.

Four-thread Lady Betty's wool,—pink and white may be used. Eight needles will be[93] required, viz. four No. 25, two No. 18, and two, each one inch in circumference.

Cast on eighty-two stitches, with pink, No. 18 needles,—knit four plain rows.

Knit four plain rows.

Bring the wool forward, knit two together.

Knit three plain rows.

white.

Repeat the last four rows, six times.—There will now be thirty-six rows from the commencement.

Cast sixteen more stitches on the same needle, to form the piece at the back.—Repeat six more rows of the pattern.—Knit two plain rows in pink;—then, divide the stitches on three No. 25 needles, to form a round,—as a commencement for the crown.

Knit three plain rounds.

Fourth round—bring the wool forward, knit two together.—Repeat.

[94]Fifth round—knit two together; knit twelve.—Repeat.

Sixth round—knit two together; knit eleven.—Repeat.

Seventh round—knit two together; knit ten.—Repeat.

Eighth round—plain knitting.

Ninth round—bring the wool forward, knit two together.—Repeat.

Tenth round—knit nine; knit two together.—Repeat.

Eleventh round—knit eight; knit two together.—Repeat.

Twelfth round—knit seven; knit two together.—Repeat.

Thirteenth round—plain knitting.

Fourteenth round—bring the wool forward, knit two together.—Repeat.

Fifteenth round—knit two together; knit eight.—Repeat.

[95]Sixteenth round—knit two together; knit seven.—Repeat.

Seventeenth round—knit two together; knit six.—Repeat.

Eighteenth round—plain knitting.

Nineteenth round—bring the wool forward, knit two together.—Repeat.

Twentieth round—knit eight; knit two together.—Repeat.

Twenty-first round—knit seven; knit two together.—Repeat.

Twenty-second round—knit six; knit two together.—Repeat.

Twenty-third round—plain knitting.

Twenty-fourth round—bring the wool forward, knit two together.—Repeat.

Twenty-fifth round—knit two together; knit five.—Repeat.

Twenty-sixth round—knit two together; knit four.—Repeat.

[96]Twenty-seventh round—knit two together; knit three.—Repeat.

Twenty-eighth round—plain knitting.

The crown is now finished; it is to be drawn up with a needle and wool.

The opening at the back must be sewn up; and a band, corresponding with the plain knitting in front, is to be formed by raising fifty-six stitches in pink, and knitting three plain rows, with the No. 18 needles. Then, with white, cast sixteen stitches on the same needle, and knit seventy-two stitches; cast on sixteen stitches, and knit three rows of eighty-eight stitches. In the next row,—bring the wool forward, knit two together. Knit six plain rows.

With the large needles, form the ruff, by knitting two rows in white, and two in pink; then, work twenty-two rows—knitting four rows in white, and two in pink, alternately. Cast off, and sew it, so as to form a very loose double ruff round the throat.

[97]For the front of the hood, raise eighty-two stitches, and, with the No. 18 needles, knit one plain row. Then, with the large needles,—knit two plain rows in white; two in pink; and four in white. Cast off.—This, when sewn double, finishes the borders of the hood. It is to be drawn, with ribbon, at the back and front.

A Baby's Sock.

Cast on twenty-eight stitches in pink German wool.—No. 19 needles.

Knit six turns, increasing a stitch at each row, to form the toe and heel.

Knit six more turns, increasing a stitch at one end only, for the toe.

Cast off thirty stitches on another needle;—knit the remaining sixteen stitches, for eighteen turns, and cast them off on another needle.

With white,—pick up the thirty pink stitches;—knit[98] three plain rows;—in the next row, bring the wool forward, knit two together.

Knit three plain rows; leave sixteen stitches on the needle, and repeat the pattern in white, across the instep, seven times, which is afterwards to be sewn to the pink knitting for the toe.

Cast on sixteen stitches in white,—to correspond with the other side.

Knit two plain rows;—in the next, bring the wool forward, knit two together,—the whole length of the row;—knit one plain row in pink, taking up the stitches that were cast off for the toe. This side of the shoe is to be made to correspond with the other, by decreasing instead of increasing.—The shoe and the white in the instep will now be finished.

Pick up the stitches both of the shoe and instep;—knit three plain turns. Take a larger needle,—bring the wool forward, knit two together, forming the holes to pass the ribbon through.

[99]Knit three plain turns with the small needle. In the next row, bring the wool forward, knit two together.

Knit three plain rows. In the next,—bring the wool forward, knit two together; repeat the same, until the sock be of the height desired.—Cast off very loosely.

Another Baby's Sock.

Four-thread fleecy, or four-thread Lady Betty's wool.—No. 11 needles.

Cast on twenty-six stitches.

First row—pearl two; knit two; alternately, to the end of the row.

Second row—knit two; pearl two.

Third row—Pearl two; knit two.

Fourth row—Pearl knitting.

Repeat the above four rows, twelve times,—making altogether fifty-two rows—but, in the fifty-second row, pearl fourteen stitches only,[100] and cast off the remaining twelve stitches. Then,—

Raise fourteen stitches, pearling them at the same time, at the commenced end, leaving twelve, to correspond with those cast off at the other end. Repeat the four rows, as before, three times,—making in all twelve rows. Fasten off, by drawing up these stitches with a needle and wool, to form the toe, and sew up the shoe at the sole.

Twenty-seven stitches are now to be raised at the top of the shoe, round the leg; then,—alternately pearl one row, and knit one row, for five rows, and cast off.—This forms a finish to the top. The shoe is to be laced across with ribbon.

A Baby's Stocking.

Cast on twenty-three stitches in brown,—No. 18 needles, and knit six turns,—increasing one stitch at each end, for the toe and heel.

[101]Knit six turns, increasing one stitch only, at the toe. There will now be forty-one stitches on the needle. Cast off twenty-five stitches, and knit the remaining sixteen stitches, for eighteen turns. One side of the shoe and instep will now be made.

Cast on twenty-five stitches, and work the other side of the shoe to correspond.

Pick up the stitches, with white, across the instep. Knit two turns, catching in one loop of the sides of the shoe, in each row, to join them together.

Knit one turn in brown; two in white; one in brown; two in white; and one in brown.—The shoe and instep will now be finished.

Pick up the stitches of the shoe, on each side of the piece which forms the instep. There should now be forty stitches on the needle.

Knit seven turns in white; then, eighteen turns, increasing a stitch at the beginning and end of every other turn. Knit three plain[102] turns; then eighteen turns,—decreasing one stitch in every other turn, at the beginning and end.

Forty stitches will now be found on the needle. Knit and pearl two, alternately, for five turns. Knit two plain rows. Knit one row in red; then, cast off loosely.

The shoe is to be sewn up into its shape, and the stocking closed up.

A Carriage Boot.

Two colours,—say blue and claret,—four, or six-thread fleecy,—Needles No. 6.

Cast seventeen stitches on each of three needles, with claret; pearl six rounds, knit five rounds.—Then,—

With blue,—knit one round, pearl one round, alternately, for six rounds.

With claret,—repeat the last six rounds.

Repeat the two last stripes, twice. Then,[103]

From the first needle,—knit fourteen stitches, with claret; join on the blue; knit twenty-three, leaving fourteen stitches (claret), corresponding with the other side, on the third needle; then, turn back and knit five rows, slipping the first stitch at the commencement of each row.

Repeat the last stripe, three times; first—with claret, second—with blue, third—with claret.

In the next three stripes of the alternate colours, knit two together at the commencement, and end, of every third row. Then,—knit one stripe (claret), knitting two together at the commencement of each row. Cast off.—This finishes the front of the boot.

Commence again at the fourteen claret stitches that were left on the first needle,—knit these, and cast on another thirty-six stitches in claret; knit six plain rows.—In the next row, knit two together, at the commencement.[104] Knit nine more rows, knitting two together at the commencement of every other row.—In the next four rows,—knit two together at the commencement of each row.—This completes the first half of the foot.

Knit the fourteen remaining stitches on the third needle, casting on thirty-six stitches, as before, and finish the other half of the foot in the same manner.

The two halves of the foot are then to be sewn together, and the foot sewn to the front of the boot.

A double-knitted Night-Sock.

Cast on eighty-eight stitches in white, four or six-thread fleecy.—No. 3 needles.

N.B. In every row the first stitch is to be slipped;—the last stitch is to be plain knitted.

First row—plain knitting.

Second row—knit one, pass the wool forward; slip one, pass the wool back.—Repeat.

[105]Repeat the second row, twenty-eight times.

Thirty-first row—knit sixty-two stitches, the same as second row; then,—knit two together, to the end of the row.

Thirty-second row—cast off twenty-five stitches; knit thirty-eight stitches, same as second row; cast off remaining twenty-five stitches.

Knit twenty rows, the same as second row.

Fifty-second row—slip one; knit two together; knit fourteen stitches, the same as second row; knit two together; knit the remaining stitches, the same as second row.

Fifty-third row—repeat the last.

Fifty-fourth row—slip one; knit two together; knit the remaining stitches, the same as second row.

Repeat the last row, seven times.

Sixty-second row—slip one; knit two together; knit eight stitches, the same as second row; knit two together; knit the remaining stitches, the same as second row.

[106]Sixty-third row—repeat the last.

Knit three rows, the same as second row.

Draw up the stitches for the toe, and sew up the back and front.

A Frileuse or Neck Tippet.

Cast on thirty stitches, with double German wool.—Needles, one inch and three quarters in circumference.

Plain knit thirty rows, slipping the first stitch of every row.—Cast off loosely.

Tie with cords and small tassels.

Wheel pattern for Tidies, etc.

Flax knitting thread, No. 10.—Needles, No. 18. Cast on any number of stitches that can be divided by ten.

First row—knit one; bring the thread forward, knit three; slip one; knit two together, pass the slip-stitch over them; knit three; bring the thread forward.—Repeat.

[107]Second row—plain knitting.

Repeat these two rows, alternately.

Knitted Coral.

Cast on four stitches, with fine flat scarlet worsted braid, No. 19 needles.

Plain knitting, but slipping the first stitch of every row.

Hints on Knitting.

A plain stitch at the beginning of each row, commonly called an edge stitch, is a great improvement in most instances, as it makes an uniform edge, and the pattern is kept more even at its commencement. In most knitting, the edge-stitch is slipped.

It is easiest to learn to knit, by holding the wool over the fingers of the left hand; the position of the hands is more graceful when thus held.

It is always advisable to cast off loosely.

[108]When it is requisite to cast off, and continue the row on a separate needle, it is sometimes better to run a coarse silk through the cast off stitches; they are easily taken up, when required, and the inconvenience of the idle needle is avoided.

In knitting, when a pattern is spoken of, it means as many rows as form the pattern.

THE END.


[i]Just published, in post 8vo. elegantly bound, price 10s. 6d. carefully revised, and considerably enlarged, with additional Woodcuts of Patterns, etc.

The Third Edition
OF THE
HAND-BOOK OF NEEDLEWORK,
BEING A COMPLETE GUIDE TO EVERY KIND OF DECORATIVE
NEEDLEWORK, CROCHET, KNITTING, AND NETTING,
WITH A BRIEF HISTORICAL ACCOUNT
OF EACH ART.

BY
MISS LAMBERT.

Contents:

CHAP.

  1. Introduction.
  2. Tapestry.
  3. Materials in General.
  4. Wool.
  5. Silk.
  6. Gold and Silver.
  7. Chenille, Braid, etc.
  8. Canvas.
  9. Berlin Patterns.
  10. Implements.
  11. Drawing Patterns for Embroidery, Braiding, etc.
  12. Framing Work.
  13. Embroidery.
  14. Stitches.
  15. Canvas Work.
  16. Braiding and Appliqué.
  17. Bead Work.
  18. Crochet.
  19. Knitting.
  20. Netting.
  21. Needlework of the English Queens and Princesses.
  22. "The Praise of the Needle."

WITH ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTEEN ILLUSTRATIVE ENGRAVINGS ON WOOD, OF PATTERNS, IMPLEMENTS, ETC.


CRITICAL NOTICES OF THE WORK.

"One of Mr. Murray's series of Handbooks, which seem destined to embrace all the arts of life as well as all the sights in the world. Miss Lambert's[ii] treatise is one of practical utility, its information being the product of experience: after sketching the history of needlework, it proceeds to describe the various kinds of materials used, such as wool, silk, gold thread, beads, &c.; the canvas, patterns, frames, and implements, required; the different kinds of stitches; the mode of working certain patterns and shapes; the processes of embroidery, knitting, and netting. The volume is very handsomely got up, and illustrated profusely with wood-cuts; nothing seems wanting to its completeness."—Spectator.

"We venture to recommend it as containing a great deal of practical information respecting embroidery, frame work, knitting, netting, braiding, bead work, and other profound mysteries, of which we, of the uglier sex, know nothing.... We soon became interested in the historical portion, which is gracefully and well written—so that the work is a good book, instructive when the party consulting it desires instruction, and amusing whenever she is weary of work. Miss Lambert observes in her Preface, that she has endeavoured, and we will add successfully, 'to embrace those subjects which appeared most worthy of notice in a Treatise on Decorative Needlework, and by combining a brief historical sketch, with a detailed account of the practice of each department, to render them more generally interesting than a mere manual of directions and examples.'"—Athenæum.

"This is the most curious, complete, and erudite treatise on the art of needlework that has, probably, ever been compiled.... The variety, fulness, and systematic arrangement of the book, not to say one word about its numerous engravings, and the remarkably elegant style in which it is 'gotten up,' demand unmixed applause."—Atlas.

"A very elegant and useful work. The directions how to ply the needle are plain and easy of comprehension, and the plates which accompany the letterpress and illustrate the designs, will be found of great assistance to the ready acquirement of the art and its numerous principles. The ample instructions for drawing patterns, purchasing implements, framing, and properly finishing work, will be found not the least available portion of the book."—Literary Gazette.

"An eminently practical work; clear in its explanation, precise in its directions, natural in its arrangements. The style is simple and easy; the collateral information abundant. Its value is enhanced by historical notices,[iii] which have been prepared with judgment and knowledge, and are not disfigured by the slightest affectation."—Polytechnic Review.

"The first edition of Miss Lambert's 'Hand-book' has been entirely sold off, a better proof of its excellence than aught we could say in its behalf; and a second edition has just appeared with an embossed cover, which will render it an ornament to the drawing-room table, as well as an object of utility from the nature of its contents. To this edition several new patterns and engravings have been added, and additional directions for crochet, knitting, netting, &c."—Morning Post.

"The authoress seems to be thoroughly mistress of her craft, and has produced not only a very instructive, but a very amusing volume upon a branch of the fine arts now become again so fashionable.... A more elegant or entertaining volume can scarcely be found on a drawing-room table."—Globe.

"This is a pleasant book, a good book, and a book worthy to be bought by mothers and daughters, and studied, con amore, in quiet parlours and snug nurseries. It is well produced. Its knowledge is practical, as a few extracts, which may be of advantage to our readers, will best show."—Pictorial Times.

"Replete with excellent practical information, clear and concise rules for acquiring a knowledge of all the varied branches of the art, illustrated by a series of beautifully executed designs, representing implements, patterns, material, and numerous articles of modern fancy-work, eminently calculated to initiate the unlearned (aye, and learned too) in all the mysteries of tent-stitch, embroideries, braid, appliqué, bead, chenille, canvas, and Berlin work, &c. In short, the work justifies its title; it possesses an elegant exterior, and we prognosticate that few ladies will willingly dispense with so much silent instruction."—Sunday Times.

"The pretty volume now before us, has been compiled with exceeding care, and strict attention to the most minute details; all is well-arranged.... The illustrations are a valuable addition to the interest and information of a volume which deserves a place on the table of every lady."—Art Union.

"A new and carefully revised edition of this very elegant work is here presented to us, and we do not hesitate to assure our fair readers, that they will find it highly deserving of a place on the boudoir and drawing-room tables. The volume, we should premise, is exclusively devoted to ornamental[iv] needlework, and will be found as interesting as it is useful, for, in addition to very clear and accurate instructions for acquiring a proficiency in every branch of the art, it contains an historical notice of its cultivation from the earliest ages."—Court Journal.

"This 'Hand-book' cannot fail to assist the best taste; utile et dulce have been carefully blended, and the descriptive letter-press has evidently been given by a well-informed mind."—Court Gazette.

"This elegantly printed volume contains a complete encyclopædia of information for the fair votaries of the needle. The various mysteries of tapestry work, embroidery-work, and so forth, are fully laid open, with a clearness of statement, and completeness of direction, which leave nothing to desire."—Illustrated London News.


LONDON:
JOHN MURRAY, ALBEMARLE STREET.


Richards, Printer, 100, St. Martin's Lane.


THE LADIES' LIBRARY,
OF
RURAL HOUSEHOLD ECONOMY.

The following Volumes are now Published:

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With a Calendar of Practical Operations and Directions for every Month in the Year. By Mrs. Loudon. With Illustrative Woodcuts. Sixth Edition. Fcap. 8vo., 6s.

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Of this Volume upwards of 280,000 copies have been sold.

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A Collection of more than a Thousand valuable Receipts in various Branches of Domestic Economy. New Edition. Fcap. 8vo. 5s. 6d.

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By Mrs. Loudon. With numerous Illustrations. Fcap. 8vo. (Just ready.)

⁂ Each Volume is strongly Bound in Cloth, and may be purchased separately.

[TURN OVER.

ELEMENTARY WORKS for YOUNG PERSONS.

I.

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VIII.

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IX.

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X.

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XII.

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