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MISSION FURNITURE

HOW TO MAKE IT

PART THREE


POPULAR MECHANICS HANDBOOKS

CHICAGO

POPULAR MECHANICS COMPANY

Copyrighted, 1912 BY H. H. WINDSOR


A WARDROBE

The wardrobe or clothes closet shown in the accompanying sketch and detail drawing will be found a great convenience in a bedroom where closet space is limited or where there is no closet at all. It provides ample room for hanging suits, dresses and other wearing apparel, as well as space for boots and shoes. It can be made of any of the several furniture woods in common use, but quarter-sawed oak will be found to give the most pleasing effect. The stock should be ordered from the mill ready cut to length, squared and sanded. In this way much labor will be saved. The following pieces will be needed:

The Wardrobe Complete

The Wardrobe Complete

First be sure the posts are perfectly square and of equal length. The upper ends can be chamfered or rounded if desired. The two front posts are alike, as are the back ones. The mortises should be laid out in each pair of posts and then cut with a sharp chisel, or they can be left until the tenons are all made, and then marked and cut from each tenon. Grooves should be cut on one side of all the posts to take the end panels.

The front and lower back rails are plain except for the tenons at each end, but the end rails and the center uprights should have grooves cut for the panels the same as the posts. The top back rail serves as a top back board and should have the corners rounded as shown in the detail drawing.

The frame can now be assembled. Glue should be used on all the joints as it makes them much stiffer. Be careful to get the frame together perfectly square, or it will be hard to fit the doors and the shelves.

The top and bottom boards should have the corners cut to clear the posts. The closet is divided into two compartments by a partition. This can be made of plain boards or panels similar to those in the ends, as desired. Place the shelves in position as shown. They are held in place by means of cleats and screws. The one shelf has a partition in its center with a door on one side and two small drawers on the other. Drawers should be fitted to three of the other compartments. They are made in the usual manner except that the front boards should be cut out at the top for a handhold as shown.

The doors are fitted by a tenon and mortise joint at the ends. They have a centerpiece and panels to match the ends of the closet. Suitable hinges and a catch should be supplied. These can be purchased at any hardware store.

Detail of the Wardrobe

Detail of the Wardrobe

The backing is put on in the usual manner. It should be finished on the front side.

When complete, the closet should be carefully gone over with fine sandpaper and all glue and rough spots removed. Apply stain of the desired color. This may be any of the many mission stains supplied by the trade for this purpose.


Mission Furniture

  1. A PIANO BENCH
  2. A LIBRARY TABLE
  3. A PRINCESS DRESSER
  4. A SEWING BOX
  5. A FERN STAND
  6. A WARDROBE
  7. A FINISH
  8. AN OAK TABLE
  9. BOOK TROUGH
  10. AN OAK SERVING TABLE
  11. AN UMBRELLA STAND
  12. A CHAFING-DISH BUFFET
  13. A WRITING DESK
  14. MUSIC RACK AND BOOKSTAND
  15. A DICTIONARY AND MAGAZINE STAND 
  16. A LEATHER BACK ARM CHAIR 
  17. A WALL SHELF
  18. A PEDESTAL
  19. MAGAZINE RACK
  20. A HALL TREE
  21. A TABLE FOR THE DEN 
  22. A BURLAP-COVERED WINDOW SEAT 
  23. QUARTER-SAWED OAK SETTEE 
  24. A SCREEN
  25. A MISSION BOOKRACK 
  26. A ROUND EXTENSION DINING TABLE 
  27. AN ARM DINING CHAIR 
  28. A HALL BENCH
  29. A SEWING TABLE
  30. A SIDE CHAIR
  31. ANOTHER PIANO BENCH 
  32. ANOTHER SCREEN
  33. A FOLDING CARD TABLE 
  34. MAGAZINE STAND
  35. A TABOURET
  36. A PORCH SWING
  37. A FOOT WARMER
  38. A PLATE RACK FOR THE DINING ROOM 
  39. A MISSION SIDEBOARD 



                                                                

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Ronald Hunter
           
  All images and text are copyright Ronald Hunter 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008 & 2009.
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