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MISSION FURNITURE

HOW TO MAKE IT

PART THREE


POPULAR MECHANICS HANDBOOKS

CHICAGO

POPULAR MECHANICS COMPANY

Copyrighted, 1912 BY H. H. WINDSOR


A PORCH SWING

Complete Porch Swing

Complete Porch Swing

The porch swing shown in the illustration can be made of southern pine at a very moderate cost. It should be suspended by rustless black chains and eyebolts passing through the lower rails. If cushions are desired they can be made up quite cheaply of elastic felt covered with denim cloth.

These pieces, dressed and sanded, may be bought at the mill:

Plane and square the ends of all the rails and posts. Lay out the lap joints for the back rails and posts. Use a knife line for this and saw exactly to the line to avoid trimming with the chisel. When sawing be careful to cut exactly halfway through the thickness of each piece. In the same way make the lap joints between the front rail and posts. Have the two end rails exactly the same length and proceed to fasten the front and back posts to them, using 4-in. lag screws and washers. Bore through the posts and part way into the ends of the end rails for the lag screws.

Detail of the Porch Swing

Detail of the Porch Swing

The slats are mortised 1/2 in. into the back rails, or a 3/8-in. groove may be planed in these rails, the entire distance between joints, to receive the slats. A rabbeting plane will be needed for this. The arm rests lap over the back posts and are held to them with 2-in. round-head screws. They may be fastened to the top of the front posts with round-head screws or dowel pins.

Ordinary pine flooring makes a good, tight seat, or 7/8-in. board may be used if desired. Fasten the cleats, which support the seat, to the front and back lower rails with 1-1/2-in. screws.

To bring out the beautiful grain of southern pine, stain it brown or black and finish with two coats of waterproof varnish.


Mission Furniture

  1. A PIANO BENCH
  2. A LIBRARY TABLE
  3. A PRINCESS DRESSER
  4. A SEWING BOX
  5. A FERN STAND
  6. A WARDROBE
  7. A FINISH
  8. AN OAK TABLE
  9. BOOK TROUGH
  10. AN OAK SERVING TABLE
  11. AN UMBRELLA STAND
  12. A CHAFING-DISH BUFFET
  13. A WRITING DESK
  14. MUSIC RACK AND BOOKSTAND
  15. A DICTIONARY AND MAGAZINE STAND 
  16. A LEATHER BACK ARM CHAIR 
  17. A WALL SHELF
  18. A PEDESTAL
  19. MAGAZINE RACK
  20. A HALL TREE
  21. A TABLE FOR THE DEN 
  22. A BURLAP-COVERED WINDOW SEAT 
  23. QUARTER-SAWED OAK SETTEE 
  24. A SCREEN
  25. A MISSION BOOKRACK 
  26. A ROUND EXTENSION DINING TABLE 
  27. AN ARM DINING CHAIR 
  28. A HALL BENCH
  29. A SEWING TABLE
  30. A SIDE CHAIR
  31. ANOTHER PIANO BENCH 
  32. ANOTHER SCREEN
  33. A FOLDING CARD TABLE 
  34. MAGAZINE STAND
  35. A TABOURET
  36. A PORCH SWING
  37. A FOOT WARMER
  38. A PLATE RACK FOR THE DINING ROOM 
  39. A MISSION SIDEBOARD 



                                                                

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Written and maintained by
Ronald Hunter
           
  All images and text are copyright Ronald Hunter 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008 & 2009.
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