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MISSION FURNITURE

HOW TO MAKE IT

PART THREE


POPULAR MECHANICS HANDBOOKS

CHICAGO

POPULAR MECHANICS COMPANY

Copyrighted, 1912 BY H. H. WINDSOR


A PIANO BENCH



Piano Bench in Black Walnut

The piano bench shown in the accompanying picture was made of black walnut and was finished natural. The finish was applied in the following manner: First, all the parts were well scraped and sandpapered, then the surface was covered with a coating of boiled linseed oil. After this had stood several hours, or until it had had time to penetrate the wood, the surplus liquid was wiped off with a flannel cloth. After the oil had stood for 48 hours, a thin coat of shellac was applied and allowed to harden overnight. The next morning this shellac [6] was sandpapered lightly with No. 00 paper and a coat of floor wax was applied according to the directions which are found upon every can. Two more coats of wax were applied after intervals of half an hour and the finish was completed. The effect is very pleasing. The oil brings out the rich color of the wood and the shellac and wax serve to preserve the color. The following stock is needed:

  • 1 top, 1 by 16-1/2 by 40-1/2 in., S-2-S.
  • 4 posts, 1-1/2 by 1-1/2 by 20 in., S-4-S.
  • 2 rails, 7/8 by 4-1/4 by 36 in., S-2-S.
  • 2 rails, 7/8 by 4-1/4 by 13 in., S-2-S.
  • 2 lower rails, 7/8 by 2-1/2 by 13 in., S-2-S.
  • 1 stretcher, 7/8 by 3-3/4 by 36 in., S-2-S.
  • 6 slats, 3/8 by 1-1/4 by 11 in., S-2-S.

With the exception of the legs all the stock is specified mill-planed to thickness upon two surfaces. The legs are specified planed on four sides. Square the legs to length and the rails, stretcher, slats, etc., to width and length.



Detail of the Piano Bench

Lay out and work the tenons of the rails and stretcher. The slats are best made without tenons, the whole end of each slat being "housed" into the rails. The reason for this is obvious—it is a difficult matter to fit two or more pieces between fixed parts when their ends are tenoned. When the ends are housed any slight variation in the lengths adjusts itself. It is necessary, however, to chisel the sides of the mortises carefully, but this is a simple matter compared with getting the shoulders of the tenons, etc., all just alike.

Assemble the parts, using good hot glue. Put the ends of the bench together first. When the glue has hardened on these, place the stretcher and side rails. Fasten the top to the frame from the under side, either by glued blocks and screws or by angle irons.


This book is one of the series of handbooks on industrial subjects being published by the Popular Mechanics Co. Like the magazine, these books are "written so you can understand it," and are intended to furnish information on mechanical subjects at a price within the reach of all. The texts and illustrations have been prepared expressly for this Handbook Series, by experts; are up-to-date, and have been revised by the editor of Popular Mechanics. The dimensions given in the stock list contained in the description of each piece of furniture illustrated in this book call for material mill-planed, sanded and cut to length. If the workman desires to have a complete home-made article, allowance must be made in the dimensions for planing and squaring the pieces. S-4-S and S-2-S are abbreviations for surface four sides and surface two sides.

Mission Furniture

  1. A PIANO BENCH
  2. A LIBRARY TABLE
  3. A PRINCESS DRESSER
  4. A SEWING BOX
  5. A FERN STAND
  6. A WARDROBE
  7. A FINISH
  8. AN OAK TABLE
  9. BOOK TROUGH
  10. AN OAK SERVING TABLE
  11. AN UMBRELLA STAND
  12. A CHAFING-DISH BUFFET
  13. A WRITING DESK
  14. MUSIC RACK AND BOOKSTAND
  15. A DICTIONARY AND MAGAZINE STAND 
  16. A LEATHER BACK ARM CHAIR 
  17. A WALL SHELF
  18. A PEDESTAL
  19. MAGAZINE RACK
  20. A HALL TREE
  21. A TABLE FOR THE DEN 
  22. A BURLAP-COVERED WINDOW SEAT 
  23. QUARTER-SAWED OAK SETTEE 
  24. A SCREEN
  25. A MISSION BOOKRACK 
  26. A ROUND EXTENSION DINING TABLE 
  27. AN ARM DINING CHAIR 
  28. A HALL BENCH
  29. A SEWING TABLE
  30. A SIDE CHAIR
  31. ANOTHER PIANO BENCH 
  32. ANOTHER SCREEN
  33. A FOLDING CARD TABLE 
  34. MAGAZINE STAND
  35. A TABOURET
  36. A PORCH SWING
  37. A FOOT WARMER
  38. A PLATE RACK FOR THE DINING ROOM 
  39. A MISSION SIDEBOARD 



                                                                

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Written and maintained by
Ronald Hunter
           
  All images and text are copyright Ronald Hunter 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008 & 2009.
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