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BETTER MEALS FOR

LESS MONEY

BY

MARY GREEN

NEW YORK

HENRY HOLT AND COMPANY

1917


Copyright, 1917,

BY

HENRY HOLT AND COMPANY


PREFACE

With the steadily increasing cost of all staple foods the need of intelligent buying, cooking, and serving is greater than ever before: more money must be spent for food, or more consideration must be given to selecting and using it. For those who would continue to serve their households well, and whose allowance for food has not kept pace with prices, there is only one alternative, and that is, to use more of the cheaper foods, and to prepare and combine them so skilfully that economy shall not be a hardship. Good meals depend not so much upon expensive material as upon care and good judgment in the use of ordinary material. The time-worn boarding-house jokes about prunes and hash mean simply that these foods, in themselves excellent, are poorly prepared and too frequently served.

It is the plan of this book to include a variety of (1) recipes which require only a small amount of meat; (2) recipes for vegetable dishes which can take the place of meat; (3) recipes for the economical use of cereals, dairy products, and other common inexpensive foods; (4) recipes for breads, cakes, and desserts requiring only a small amount of butter and eggs; and (5) recipes for a few relishes, condiments, and other accessories which lend variety and interest. The General Suggestions for Economy (Chapter I) are not all new, but are liable, through disuse, to be forgotten by the present generation. Spasmodic economy counts for little in the long run; only systematic and continued watchfulness is really worth while.

Economy, however, ought not to necessitate the total elimination of one's favorite cuts of steak, nor all of the little luxuries, because by the skilful planning of the majority of the meals the occasional use of these luxuries can be made possible.

This book is not intended as a complete guide to cookery; it presupposes an elementary knowledge of the care and preparation of food.

The study of Tables D and E in the Appendix is especially recommended as an aid to the better understanding of food values.

M. G.


CONTENTS

Before using recipes see Special Notice on Page 14.

[Pg 1]


CHAPTER I

GENERAL SUGGESTIONS FOR ECONOMY

PLANNING MEALS

In order to buy, prepare, and serve food to the best possible advantage, an elementary knowledge of the composition and nutritive value of foods, and the necessary food requirement of the family, is essential. Many books are published on these subjects, but from the government publications alone (see page 255) an excellent working knowledge may be obtained. Only the merest outline can be given here, and this should be supplemented by further reading.

Briefly stated, food is divided into three chief classes:[1] (1) Protein, which builds and repairs the tissues.[2] It is furnished chiefly by meats, fish, cheese, milk, eggs, cereals, and legumes. (2) Fats, which furnish heat and energy, but are chiefly valuable for storing a reserve supply of fat in the body. They are furnished largely by butter, cream, olive and similar vegetable oils, bacon and other fat meats. (3) Carbohydrates, which furnish heat and energy. They[Pg 2] are supplied chiefly by potatoes and other vegetables, cereals, fruits, and sugars.

People who are eating the proper amount and kind of food should approximate the normal weight[3] for their sex, age, and height. For the proper maintenance of the body, a man of average height and weight, of sedentary life,[4] requires daily food which will yield about 2,500 calories;[5] a woman of average height and weight, about 2,300 calories (more or less according to activity). Children between two and five years require from 1,200 to 1,400 calories; between five and ten years, from 1,400 to 1,900 calories; and from ten to fourteen years, from 1,900 to 2,500 calories. Girls between fourteen and seventeen years require from 2,200 to 2,600 calories; and boys between fourteen and seventeen years, from 2,500 to 3,000 calories. Of the total number of calories furnished ten per cent. should be protein, approximately 30 per cent. fat, and 60 per cent. carbohydrates.

Before planning meals the consideration of these caloric requirements and the study of the "Caloric Value of Average Portions of Food" (Table D, page 245) and of the "Fuel Value of Raw Materials" (Table E, page 250) will help in the selection of foods to yield approximately the desired amount of nutrition. It is not necessary or desirable that the exact amount of each class of foods should be reckoned daily; but by the general study of foods and their nutritive value, and the food requirements of the[Pg 3] body, which vary with age, sex, and conditions, the housekeeper may serve her family with the kinds and amount of food best suited to their needs. She should plan to use in a week as large a variety of food as possible, and to avoid an excess of any one class. With a definite idea of the needs of the family, she should take account of the stock in the ice-box and pantry, and see that every bit of food is utilized to advantage. Meals should be planned in detail at least one day in advance, and, if possible, outlined for several days ahead; though these plans must, of course, be varied slightly, at times, according to the amount of left-over material and the exigencies of supply and demand. Each day's programme should be plainly written; any special recipes to be used noted; and a list made of supplies to be ordered. To have the meals planned well in advance and the order list ready saves a deal of nervous energy, time, and money.

MARKETING

If possible, attend personally to your marketing and consider carefully the quality, quantity, and cost of your purchases in relation to the needs of your purse and your household. Ask for what you want, and try hard to get it; but in trying to buy supplies at lowest prices be sure that the time and nervous energy spent are not out of proportion to the amount of money saved.

MEAT

In considering the price of meat, the amount of bone, fat, gristle, and so forth should be taken into account. Many of the coarser and cheaper parts contain as much[Pg 4] nutriment as the more expensive cuts, and can, by proper cooking, be made fully as palatable. See that every bit of left-over meat is used to advantage and in a variety of ways; the rinds of bacon and salt pork when cooked with spinach or other greens, or in soups of peas or beans, add both flavor and richness.

THE STOCK POT

All trimmings and bones, both cooked and uncooked, and any left-over bits of meat or gravy that are not needed for other dishes, should be put into the stock pot, covered with cold water, and simmered (not boiled) with soup vegetables and savory herbs for three or four hours. Almost any left-over vegetable can be added, including macaroni, rice, and the scrapings of the cereal cooker. If the family is small, the cereal cooker itself makes an excellent stock pot: to the remnants of breakfast cereal, add any soup material at hand; cover with cold water; cook slowly; strain; and, if necessary, add one or two bouillon cubes, and a few drops of kitchen bouquet. When soup stock is lacking in richness a small amount of gelatine improves the quality.

The water in which vegetables, macaroni, rice, or any meats, either fresh or salt, are cooked contains valuable mineral matter as well as flavor, and should be added wholly or in part to the stock pot. Order corned meats lightly salted so that all of the stock may be used. Be sure that all fat is removed from soup stock before using. Do not serve greasy soups. When stock must be used before the fat has had time to harden, skim off as much as possible, and remove what remains with clean blotting paper, or a lump of ice wrapped in cheesecloth.[Pg 5]

FISH

Fresh fish is offered in variety at all seasons of the year, and is a valuable and comparatively inexpensive food; salted and smoked fish contain much protein in a concentrated form; the canned varieties are important, too, especially for the emergency shelf, as they furnish a substantial, inexpensive food which can be served in many ways at short notice.

GROCERIES

Groceries in sealed packages are, as a rule, slightly more expensive than those sold in bulk; but they are cleaner, often fresher, and more convenient to store and use.

BUTTER AND OTHER SHORTENING

To the taste of the average person, there is no real equivalent for the flavor of fine creamery butter, but, for cooking, excellent results may be obtained by the use of cheaper shortening, beginning with the common household fats which are so often discarded. All drippings from the roasts and fat from boiled meats should be carefully strained and saved; beef and chicken fat may be used in many recipes, including those for cookies, cakes, meat sauces, soups, and made dishes; bacon fat is excellent for corn cake, meat sauces, and soups of peas, beans, or lentils; sausage fat may be used for gingerbread, cookies, poultry stuffing, and also for frying potatoes and other vegetables, for in these the spicy flavoring is not objectionable. Both bacon and sausage fat and that from soup stock are useful for basting lean roasts, fish, or meat loaf. Any surplus fat, including that of lamb and mutton, should be clarified and added to that in the frying kettle.[Pg 6] Fat which cannot be utilized for cooking should be made into kitchen soap.

COOKING FATS—OILS

There are many excellent brands of wholesome cooking fats and oils on the market, including peanut, corn, and cottonseed oil, and compound vegetable fats. Almost any of these costs less than butter.

OLEOMARGARINE

The best oleomargarine is wholesome and economical, and much to be preferred to inferior grades of butter.

MILK

Milk, even at present prices, gives good return in food value. Unsweetened evaporated milk, which is absolutely sterile and clean, costs no more, and in some places costs less, than fresh milk, and can be used to advantage to supplement the supply. Because of its consistency it is an excellent substitute for cream in frozen desserts.

CREAM

When eggs are relatively cheaper than cream, the stiffly beaten white of an egg may be used to advantage to mix with beaten cream. Thin cream whipped with a whip churn is lighter and less expensive than heavy cream beaten.

EGGS

Unless the winter's supply of eggs has been preserved in water glass, guaranteed cold storage eggs will be found satisfactory, and much cheaper than hennery eggs. Only[Pg 7] enough for a few days should be bought at a time, however, and they should be kept in a cold place until used. Wash eggs before breaking, and save the shells for clearing boiled coffee, soup, and aspic. For coating croquettes, dilute each beaten egg with one-fourth cup of water or one-third cup of milk; cover unused yolks with water to prevent drying, and pour off water before using. Have both yolk and white of egg cold, so that they may be beaten more quickly; add a pinch of salt to whites of eggs which are to be beaten stiff, and beat in a current of air. Soft-boiled or dropped eggs not used at table should be put back in boiling water, cooked hard, and used for garnishing, egg sauce, etc.

CHEESE

Cheese is nutritious and, even at present prices, economical, as it contains a large proportion of protein in concentrated form. It can be successfully combined with many other foods, and every left-over bit should be so used; when partly dry it should be put through the food chopper, using a fine cutter; when very dry it should be grated and used in sauces, soufflés, soups, and many other dishes. Cheese is more readily digested if a pinch of baking soda is cooked with it. To keep cheese moist and fresh, brush the cut surface with melted paraffin. Save left-over Welsh rarebit for sandwich filling. The shells of Edam or pineapple cheeses should not be thrown away, but be filled with creamed macaroni, spaghetti, or rice, covered with crumbs, and baked in a hot oven.

FRESH VEGETABLES

A variety of vegetables should be served daily, and those which contain a large amount of protein, such as beans,[Pg 8] lentils, and peas, should be used not only as an accompaniment to meat, but, in combination with other vegetables, sauces, bacon or other fats, as the substantial dish of the meal.

DRIED VEGETABLES

Dried vegetables should be soaked in cold water for twelve hours or longer, and then cooked slowly until tender; dried julienne should be soaked for twenty-four hours before cooking.

MACARONI, NOODLES, RICE, CEREALS

Macaroni, noodles and similar pastas, rice, and the cereals furnish much nutriment at low cost; oatmeal and corn meal are among our cheapest foods.

Ready cooked cereals, though they are convenient and give variety to the diet, are more expensive than raw cereals well cooked; not only do they yield less food value, but, being dry, they require more cream or milk to make them palatable.

LEFT-OVER VEGETABLES

Left-over vegetables and cereals, even in small quantities, should be saved for use in entrées, desserts, salads, sauces, and soups. Celery tops should be saved for flavoring and garnishing, the root stalk chopped and added to the stock pot, and the outside stalks stewed, creamed, or used for cream soup. The outside leaves of lettuce should be shredded for salad, or, for any large quantity, cooked the same as spinach.

CANNED VEGETABLES

The flavor of canned vegetables is improved if, before being cooked, they are rinsed with cold water and exposed[Pg 9] to the air. Parsley and chives may be kept growing in pots in the kitchen window to be used as needed.

SALADS

Salads should be freely used at all seasons, and be made light or nourishing according to the foods served with them. They offer an opportunity to the housekeeper to exercise her ingenuity in combining various vegetables, meats, and fruits, especially left-over bits. Crisp white cabbage, shredded, may be used in place of celery.

SALAD DRESSINGS

Salad dressings need not necessarily be made of olive oil, for there are other good and less expensive vegetable oils well worth using, and many of the cooked salad dressings without oil are excellent.

BREAD

Various kinds of bread should be freely used, especially whole wheat and other cereal breads, and those containing raisins, dates, and prunes. Watch the bread-box, and see that every bit of bread is used in some way; the unused crusts should be dried, rolled, sifted, and kept in a covered jar for stuffing, crumbing croquettes, brown bread, puddings, or other dishes in which the color is not objectionable; cold toast or cut slices should be made into croutons, or used for canapés or French toast; other pieces should be used for croustades, or made into crumbs, both coarse and fine, for use in fondues, griddle cakes, omelets, sauces, and soups. Bits of crackers should be dried, rolled, and used the same as bread crumbs.[Pg 10]

CAKE

None of the recipes for cake require more than two eggs; many, only one; and some, none at all. Water may always be used in place of milk, and any clean, fresh shortening may be substituted for butter, especially in the recipes which include molasses and spices. These cakes will not keep moist like richer cakes, however, and should be used soon after making.

Slices of stale cake and crumbs should be utilized in making other desserts in combination with custards, ices, preserves, etc.

BAKING POWDER

Do not use more baking powder than is necessary for good results; two level teaspoons to each cup of flour is the usual allowance, but one and one-half teaspoons each to each cup will be sufficient if the muffins, biscuits, or cake are quickly and lightly handled and properly baked.

FLAVORING EXTRACTS

When volatile flavoring extracts are used in cake, much of their strength is wasted during baking; grated rind or spices could well be used in their place, or only the icing or filling flavored. All desserts, whenever practicable, should be flavored when cold.

COLORING

The small package of red coloring which comes with gelatine is useful for coloring cakes, icings, and other desserts as well as jellies.

FRUITS

Fruits, either fresh, dried, or preserved, should be served at least once a day; dried fruits, such as apricots,[Pg 11] peaches, and prunes, should be soaked in cold water for twelve hours or longer and then cooked slowly until tender. Raisins, dates, and figs yield a large food value at comparatively low cost. Bananas, which contain more nutriment than most fresh fruits, should be used for salads or desserts when the other courses are light. In cooking acid fruits, such as cranberries, plums, and cherries, less sugar is required if added after cooking. Parings and cores from quinces and apples can be made into excellent jelly; the rinds of watermelons are the foundation of a delicious sweet pickle; orange and grape fruit peel, when candied, are well worth the trouble of making. Surplus orange, lemon, and grape fruit peels, when dried, are not only useful for flavoring, but make an interesting and aromatic fuel for the fire-place; the nut meat found in prune stones tastes much like that of bitter almonds and can be used in place of them.

When making jelly remember that the pulp of the fruit after the juice has dripped from it may be made into excellent marmalade: cover with water, heat to boiling point, press through a sieve, add three-quarters of the amount of sugar, and cook until thick.

CANDIES

In spite of its cost, candy is now classed by many with the necessities rather than with the luxuries. After a little practice even the most elaborate candies can be successfully made at home, and the difference between the cost of a pound of the best ready-made candy and the cost of the raw materials is astonishing. For those who can spare the time, candy-making will prove both fascinating[Pg 12] and economical. Recipes for a few after-dinner candies are given.

CONDIMENTS

A small supply of condiments and relishes, including kitchen bouquet, ketchup, and sweet herbs, and one or two table sauces, should be kept in stock, as they make possible a greater variety of flavors. Many home-made sauces and relishes can be easily and quickly prepared and are usually much cheaper than the ready-made varieties.

CANDLE STUBS

Candle stubs should be melted, strained through cheesecloth, and used for sealing ketchup, jellies, and preserves.

GARNISHINGS

Any dish, attractively garnished and served, pleases the eye, stimulates the appetite, and often lifts a simple meal out of the commonplace. Parsley, mint, celery tops, red and green peppers, olives, pickles, capers, cooked beets and carrots, hard-cooked egg, lemon cut in various shapes, nuts, cherries, and other small fruits are all effective if not too lavishly used.

UTENSILS

A reasonable equipment of kitchen utensils and a convenient, systematic arrangement of them will save time and strength. Kitchen scales are almost indispensable, and a cooking thermometer eliminates guesswork, especially in boiling sugar and heating fat for frying. Pans, molds, and cutters of various shapes prevent monotony; suitable baking dishes and covered casserole dishes simplify both cooking and serving; and food cooked or served in individual[Pg 13] dishes is often more attractive. When the cogs of the egg beater slip, do not discard it, but tighten the rivet; keep knives well sharpened. Cream jars, jugs, bottles, or any other containers for which a charge is made, should be promptly returned to be credited.

FUEL

Do not waste fuel; concentrate your cooking; when a hot oven is needed for roasting meat or baking bread, plan to cook at the same time other things which require a high temperature; potatoes can be cooked in the pan with the meat; other vegetables and fruits can be cooked in the oven; and if a coal fire is used, a variety of food can be cooked in a steamer on top of the range without extra fuel.

Have the ashes sifted and save the cinders, which yield a quick top heat.

Economize gas by using the minimum amount necessary to keep food cooking at the desired temperature. When the boiling point is reached a small supply of gas will maintain the temperature.

Fireless cookers save much fuel and unnecessary heat, and are especially useful for any food which requires long, slow cooking, or for those foods of strong odor which so often scent up the whole house.

[Pg 14]


SPECIAL NOTICE

All ingredients in these recipes should be measured level, and the standard teaspoon, tablespoon, and half-pint measuring cup should be used.

Unless otherwise stated, one apple, onion, orange, etc., means one of medium size.

Sift flour before measuring, and fill cup lightly. Use pastry flour, unless otherwise directed, for thickening soups and sauces, and in all recipes where baking powder is used; use bread flour in all recipes where yeast is used.

The majority of these recipes are planned to serve four persons; those for chowders and other dishes which form the substantial part of the meal are sufficient for second helpings; those for cakes, muffins, and other breads are large enough to be served more than once.[Pg 15]


CHAPTER II

COMMON WAYS OF COOKING FOOD

Baking is cooking in confined heat in the oven. Examples: bread, cake, meat. This method when applied to meat is commonly called roasting. Before baking, see that the oven is clean and heated to the desired temperature.

Boiling is cooking by immersion in water at 212° F. Examples: potatoes, cabbage, macaroni.

Braising is a combination of stewing on the top of the range, and baking in the oven, with or without vegetables. Examples: tough meats, fowl, whole liver.

Broiling or Grilling is cooking over or under direct heat, as over glowing coals or under a gas flame. Examples: steak, chops.

Fricasseeing is commonly a combination of stewing and sautéing. Examples: fowl, forequarter of lamb or veal.

Frying is cooking by immersion in hot deep fat. Examples: doughnuts, croquettes.

Pan-baking or Pan-broiling is cooking in a lightly greased or ungreased hot frying pan or griddle. Examples: steak, English muffins, griddle cakes.

Pot Roasting is cooking in an iron kettle or earthen pot in a small amount of water, after meat has been quickly browned in a small amount of fat in the frying pan[Pg 16] or kettle. Cook slowly until very tender, with or without vegetables.

Roasting is cooking before an open fire. This method is seldom used in small households, although the baking of meats is commonly called roasting.

Sautéing is cooking in a small amount of fat in a shallow pan on top of range. Examples: sliced fish, meat, potatoes, eggs.

Simmering is cooking in liquid at 185° F. The bubbles should always be below the surface. Examples: ham, corned beef, soups.

Steaming. Dry Steaming is cooking by heat of steam, as in double boiler or tin, over or surrounded by boiling water. Examples: rice, brown bread. Moist Steaming is cooking by direct contact with steam as in a steamer or colander, over boiling water, closely covered. Examples: fowl, puddings, dumplings.

Stewing is cooking slowly in a small amount of water (about 160° F.) until food is very tender. Examples: beef, lamb, vegetables.[Pg 17]


CHAPTER III

APPETIZERS AND RELISHES

1.—COCKTAIL SAUCE

¼ cup tomato ketchup ½ teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon bottled horseradish 1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
2 tablespoons vinegar Dash of cayenne

Mix, and serve in four small glasses or lemon shells, with six small clams or oysters in each. Shrimps, prawns, or lobster may be used instead of clams or oysters.

2.—ASHEVILLE CANAPÉS

Peel and cut small tomatoes in quarter-inch slices; cut thin rounds of bread the same size as tomatoes; toast bread, spread with Mustard Butter (see No. 459), or salad dressing, and cover with a slice of tomato; season lightly with salt and pepper, and cover with thin slices of cooked chicken livers. Garnish with parsley.

3.—CLUB CANAPÉS

Mix devilled ham with a little grated cheese; spread on thin rounds of brown bread, and mark into quarters with finely chopped pickle. Chop fine the white of a hard-cooked egg, and cover two opposite quarters; press the yolk through a sieve, and cover the remaining quarters.[Pg 18]

4.—CRAB MEAT CANAPÉS

1 cup crab meat 1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
¼ teaspoon paprika 1 tablespoon lemon juice
½ teaspoon salt ½ teaspoon horseradish
¼ teaspoon mustard

Chop crab meat, mix well with seasonings, and spread on thin rounds of untoasted brown bread. Garnish with small cube of lemon.

5.—MOCK CRAB CANAPÉS

1 cup canned corn 1 teaspoon anchovy paste
¼ teaspoon salt 2 tablespoons grated cheese
1/3 teaspoon paprika

Use one cup of corn which has been drained from its juice; put through food chopper, using the finest cutter; add seasonings and cheese, and spread on small rounds of toast. Garnish with small pickles sliced lengthwise.

6.—GLOUCESTER CANAPÉS

Cook a small haddock roe in boiling salted water for fifteen minutes, remove skin, mash, add a tablespoon of butter, half a teaspoon of anchovy paste, one-fourth teaspoon of paprika, and enough cream to moisten; add salt if necessary. Mound on small rounds of toast, and garnish with sliced pickles and parsley.

7.—TUNA CANAPÉS

1 cup tuna fish ½ tablespoon olive oil
1 tablespoon tomato ketchup ½ teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon lemon juice ¼ teaspoon paprika

Chop fish, add seasonings, and spread on small rounds of lightly toasted bread. Garnish with sliced pimolas.[Pg 19]

8.—CELERY RELISH

Cut large white stalks of celery in two-inch lengths, fill with cream cheese which has been seasoned with salt, pepper, and Worcestershire sauce. Garnish with a small piece of celery top.

9.—CHEESE AND APPLE RINGS

1 large tart apple 1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
½ cup soft cheese cut fine Dash of cayenne
1/8 teaspoon salt 2 tablespoons cream

Pare and core apples, and cut in one-third-inch slices; mix cheese with seasonings and cream, beat to a paste, and spread or force through a rose tube on apple rings. Dust with paprika.

10.—SPANISH CHEESE

Cook together one and a half cups of soft or grated cheese with one-fourth cup of chili sauce until the cheese is melted. Serve immediately on toasted crackers or rounds of toast, as an appetizer or savory.

11.—CANTALOUPE COCKTAIL

2 cups cantaloupe Juice of ½ lemon
1/3 cup preserved ginger 2 tablespoons powdered sugar

Cut melon in small cubes, or in balls (using a potato cutter). Add chopped ginger, lemon juice, and sugar, and serve very cold.

12.—FRUIT COCKTAIL

2 tart apples 1 teaspoon lemon juice
1 large banana 4 tablespoons powdered sugar
2 oranges

Cut apples and bananas in small cubes; remove pith and seeds from oranges, cut pulp in small pieces, and add[Pg 20] with juice to apples and bananas; add lemon juice and sugar, place in a shallow dish, and put directly on ice for ten minutes to chill; serve in glasses, and garnish with a Preserved Cranberry (see No. 670), or a spoonful of Mock Bar-le-Duc (see No. 666). Peeled Tokay or Malaga grapes and a little grated pineapple may be added to advantage.

13.—WINTER CHILI SAUCE

1 can tomatoes 1/8 teaspoon cayenne
2 onions finely chopped ½ teaspoon cinnamon
1/3 cup brown sugar ¼ teaspoon clove
1½ teaspoons salt 1/3 cup vinegar
1 teaspoon paprika

Mix, and simmer about half an hour or until thick.

14.—PICCALILLI

3 quarts green tomatoes 2 quarts vinegar
3 quarts ripe tomatoes 1 quart sugar
2 red peppers 1 teaspoon cinnamon
3 onions ½ teaspoon clove
½ cup salt 4 tablespoons white mustard seed

Put vegetables through the food chopper, using coarse cutter; sprinkle with salt, let stand over night, and drain; add other ingredients, and cook about forty-five minutes.

15.—TABLE SAUCE

12 ripe tomatoes ¼ teaspoon pepper
1 onion 1 cup vinegar
3 green peppers 1 teaspoon ground clove
2 tablespoons sugar 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1½ tablespoons salt 2 teaspoons mustard
1 teaspoon paprika

Wipe tomatoes, cut in halves, and put in a clean, smooth preserving kettle; add onion and peppers sliced, and seasonings;[Pg 21] simmer two hours, and press through a sieve; return to kettle, simmer one hour, and seal in jars or bottles; when cool, dip tops in paraffin. This may be used in place of ready-made sauce.

16.—TOMATO KETCHUP

1 peck ripe tomatoes ½ cup whole mixed spices
3 onions 1 clove of garlic
½ cup salt 1/3 cup dry mustard
2 teaspoons cayenne 1 quart vinegar
2 tablespoons paprika 1 cup brown sugar

Wipe tomatoes, cut in halves, and put in a smooth, clean preserving kettle; add onions sliced, cook slowly for one hour, and press through a sieve; add salt, cayenne, and paprika; tie mixed spices, garlic, and mustard in double cheesecloth, add to tomatoes, and cook rapidly until mixture begins to thicken; boil vinegar and sugar together while tomatoes are cooking; add them to strained tomato; cook until ketchup is thick, or until water will not separate from it when tried on a plate. Remove spice bag, seal in sterilized jars or bottles, and when cool dip tops in melted paraffin.

17.—SMALL CUCUMBER PICKLES (Gherkins)

Wash thoroughly, count, and for every hundred cucumbers allow one cup of salt. Cover with boiling water. Let stand twenty-four hours; then drain. Fill quart preserve jars with cucumbers, then add two tablespoons of mixed whole spices, a piece of alum the size of a pea, and boiling vinegar to fill the jar. Seal, and let stand a week before using. The boiling water should be measured, as an equal amount of vinegar will be needed.[Pg 22]

18.—PEPPER HASH

6 green peppers 1 quart vinegar
6 red peppers 1 cup brown sugar
6 onions 2 tablespoons salt
1 small white cabbage 2 tablespoons mustard seed

Remove seeds from peppers and chop fine with the onion and cabbage. Put in cheesecloth, scald with boiling water, and squeeze dry; heat vinegar, sugar, salt, and mustard seed, add vegetables, and bring to the boiling point. When cool, put in a stone crock or small jars.

19.—PICKLED NASTURTIUM SEEDS

Into one quart of cider vinegar put three tablespoons salt and five or six slices of horseradish root. Pour into a jar and cover closely. Add the seeds as they ripen. Use in salads, sauces, or for garnishing as a substitute for capers.[Pg 23]


CHAPTER IV

BEVERAGES

20.—COFFEE, EGG, AND MILK

2 eggs 1½ teaspoons instantaneous coffee
2½ tablespoons sugar 3 cups milk
Few grains salt

Beat the eggs until light; add the other ingredients, and strain into glasses. Serve very cold. (This recipe fills four tumblers.)

21.—GRAPE JUICE (Unfermented)

Pick over and wash grapes, barely cover with water, and cook until soft and white; drain through cheesecloth, and to each quart of juice add one cup each of water and sugar; bring to boiling point, skim, bottle, and cork tightly. When cold, dip corks into melted paraffin.

22.—GRAPE EGGNOG

1 egg ¼ cup milk
1/3 cup grape juice Nutmeg
1 teaspoon powdered sugar

Beat egg until very light, add grape juice and sugar, and beat again, add milk, beat well, pour into a glass, and dust with nutmeg.[Pg 24]

23.—GINGER PUNCH

1¼ cups sugar 2 teaspoons Jamaica ginger
1 quart boiling water ½ cup orange juice
Grated rind 1 lemon 1/3 cup lemon juice

Boil sugar and water with the lemon rind for ten minutes; when cool, add ginger and fruit juice, and strain over cracked ice.

24.—GINGER ALE PUNCH

½ cup mint leaves 1 cup boiling water
1¼ cups sugar 2 pints ginger ale
Juice of 3 lemons 1 pint grape juice

Pour boiling water over mint leaves, sugar, and grated rind of one lemon, and let stand until cool; strain into a punch bowl containing ice, add ginger ale, grape juice, and strained lemon juice; garnish with sprigs of mint.

25.—MINT JULEP (Ginger Ale)

¾ cup sugar 4 sprigs mint
1 cup water 1 pint ginger ale
Juice of 3 lemons

Boil sugar and water ten minutes, and cool; add strained lemon juice, mint leaves bruised, and ginger ale; half fill glasses with crushed ice, add julep, and garnish with a sprig of mint.

26.—MINT LEMONADE

1 cup sugar 1 cup mint leaves
6 cups water Juice of 3 lemons

Boil sugar and water twenty minutes; add mint, and let stand until cold; add lemon juice, and strain into glasses half filled with cracked ice. Garnish with sprigs of mint.[Pg 25]

27.—TEA

Tea should be made from freshly drawn, freshly boiled water, poured over the dry tea, which has been put into a clean, scalded teapot. Cover with a cozy or stand on back of range for three or four minutes. Allow from a half to a full teaspoon of tea to each cup, according to the variety used. The finer varieties made from the first pickings require less than the coarser kinds. Be sure that tea does not boil. Serve with sugar, cream, lemon, cloves, mints, ginger, or bits of candied fruit.

28.—ICED TEA

Fill a large glass two-thirds full with cracked ice, add two thin slices of lemon with seeds removed, two teaspoons of powdered sugar, and fill with freshly made hot tea. One or two mint leaves may be added.

29.—FILTERED COFFEE

½ cup pulverized coffee 4 cups boiling water

Put coffee into bag or filter, add boiling water gradually; pour through a second time, or even a third time if liked strong. Do not boil. Serve with hot milk and cream. Wash coffee pot and bag thoroughly, and dry in the sun if possible; renew bag often.

30.—AFTER-DINNER COFFEE

½ cup pulverized coffee 2 cups boiling water

Put coffee into a filter coffee pot, add boiling water, and filter three times. Serve very hot.[Pg 26]

31.—CAFÉ AU LAIT

To recipe for After-dinner Coffee (see No. 30) add one and a half cups of hot milk.

32.—COCOA

4 teaspoons cocoa 2 cups boiling water
2 tablespoons sugar 2 cups hot milk
1/8 teaspoon salt

Mix cocoa, sugar, salt, and boiling water, and boil five minutes; add hot milk, and beat with egg beater until frothy.

33.—CHOCOLATE

1½ squares chocolate 2 cups boiling water
¼ cup sugar 2 cups hot milk
1/8 teaspoon salt

Melt chocolate in a saucepan over hot water; add sugar, salt, and boiling water; stir well, and boil five minutes; add hot milk, and beat with egg beater until frothy. Evaporated milk makes excellent chocolate or cocoa. For marshmallow chocolate put two marshmallows in each cup and pour hot chocolate over them.[Pg 27]


CHAPTER V

SOUPS WITHOUT MEAT

34.—ASPARAGUS SOUP

When fresh asparagus is served as a vegetable, cook the tough ends in the same water, which should be lightly salted. Press through a sieve, add the water, and for each three cups add one-half teaspoon of onion juice and one cup of hot milk. Thicken with one tablespoon of butter and two tablespoons of flour blended together. Add pepper, and salt if necessary.

35.—PURÉE OF BLACK BEANS

1 cup black beans ¼ teaspoon mustard
1 quart cold water 1 tablespoon bacon fat
1 slice bacon 1 tablespoon flour
½ onion 1 hard-cooked egg
1 teaspoon salt Lemon slices
½ teaspoon paprika

Soak beans over night in cold water; drain; add one quart of water, bacon, and onion, and cook three hours or until beans are soft, replacing water which cooks away; press through a sieve; add seasonings, and thicken with bacon fat and flour blended together. Serve with a thin slice of egg and lemon in each plate. Corned beef stock is an excellent substitute for water, but if it is used salt should be omitted.[Pg 28]

36.—BAKED BEAN SOUP

2 cups cold baked beans 2 tablespoons flour
1½ cups tomatoes ½ teaspoon salt
2 slices onion 1/8 teaspoon pepper
4 cups cold water 1 tablespoon tomato ketchup
1 tablespoon butter

Simmer beans, tomatoes, onion, and water for half an hour, and press through a sieve; thicken with butter and flour blended together; add seasonings, and serve with fried croutons.

37.—PURÉE OF RED KIDNEY BEANS

Follow recipe for Purée of Black Beans (see No. 35), using red kidney beans in place of black beans.

38.—DRIED LIMA BEAN SOUP

1 cup lima beans 1 cup milk
6 cups cold water 1 teaspoon salt
½ onion sliced 1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
½ carrot sliced 1 tablespoon bacon fat
½ bay leaf 2 tablespoons flour

Soak beans over night; drain; add cold water, onion, carrot, and bay leaf, and simmer an hour and a half or until beans are soft; press through a sieve, add milk and seasonings, and thicken with bacon fat and flour blended together. Serve with croutons.

39.—CAULIFLOWER SOUP

To three cups of the water in which cauliflower has been cooked add one-half teaspoon of onion juice and one cup of hot milk. Thicken with one tablespoon of butter and two[Pg 29] tablespoons of flour blended together. Season with cayenne, and salt if necessary. Add a few left-over bits of cauliflower, and serve with croutons or crisp crackers.

40.—CREAM OF CELERY SOUP

1 cup celery tops 1/8 teaspoon pepper
½ cup chopped celery 3½ cups boiling water
2 slices onion 1½ cups hot milk
¼ cup rice ½ tablespoon butter
1½ teaspoons salt

Cook celery, onion, rice, seasonings, and boiling water for half an hour; press through a sieve; add hot milk and butter, and serve with crisp crackers.

41.—CREAM OF CORN SOUP

1 can corn 1 teaspoon salt
½ onion ¼ teaspoon paprika
2 cups boiling water 1 tablespoon butter
2 cups hot milk 2 tablespoons flour

Chop corn and onion, add water, and simmer twenty minutes; press through a sieve, forcing through all the corn possible; add milk and seasonings, and thicken with butter and flour blended together.

42.—CHEESE SOUP

2 cups milk 2 tablespoons flour
2 cups boiling water ½ cup grated cheese
1 onion sliced 1 egg well beaten
½ bay leaf 1 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon butter Dash of cayenne

Scald milk, water, onion, and bay leaf twenty minutes; skim out onion and bay leaf, thicken milk with butter and[Pg 30] flour cooked together; add cheese, egg, and seasonings, and stir until cheese melts.

43.—FRUIT SOUP

3 pears Juice of ½ lemon
3 apples 1/8 teaspoon cinnamon
4 cups boiling water 3 tablespoons honey or sugar
1 tablespoon granulated tapioca

Chop fruit, add water, cook until tender, and press through a sieve; add tapioca, and cook until clear; add lemon juice, cinnamon, and honey. Serve hot or cold with toast sticks.

44.—OATMEAL SOUP

¾ cup cooked oatmeal 2 cups hot milk
½ onion sliced 1 teaspoon salt
2 cloves 1/8 teaspoon celery salt
½ bay leaf 1/8 teaspoon pepper
2 cups boiling water ½ tablespoon butter

Cook oatmeal, onion, cloves, and bay leaf in boiling water for twenty minutes, and press through a sieve; add milk, seasonings, and butter, and serve with croutons.

45.—POTATO SOUP

3 potatoes sliced ¼ teaspoon pepper
¼ cup celery tops 2 cups hot milk
½ onion 1 tablespoon butter
2 cups boiling water 2 tablespoons flour
1¼ teaspoons salt

Cook potatoes, celery, onion, and water twenty minutes; press through a sieve; add seasonings and hot milk, and thicken with butter and flour blended together.[Pg 31]

46.—CREAM OF PEA SOUP

1 can peas 1/8 teaspoon pepper
1 slice onion 2 cups boiling water
Bit of bay leaf 2 cups hot milk
Sprig of parsley 1 tablespoon butter
1 teaspoon sugar 2 tablespoons flour
1¼ teaspoons salt

Rinse the peas with cold water, and reserve one-fourth cup; simmer the remainder with seasonings and hot water for twenty minutes, and press through a sieve; thicken the milk with butter and flour blended together, and add to peas. Add the whole peas just before serving.

47.—PURÉE OF SPLIT PEAS

½ cup split peas 1/8 teaspoon pepper
4 cups water or ham stock 1 tablespoon bacon fat
2 slices onion 1 tablespoon flour
1 cup hot milk

Soak peas over night in cold water, and drain; add water or stock, and onion, and simmer about three hours or until peas are soft; press through a sieve; add milk and pepper, and thicken with bacon fat and flour blended together. Serve with croutons. If water is used in place of stock, add two slices of bacon and one and a quarter teaspoons of salt.

48.—RICE AND TOMATO SOUP

1 can tomatoes 1 tablespoon sugar
½ onion 2 cups boiling water
½ bay leaf 1/8 teaspoon soda
3 cloves 2 tablespoons bacon fat
1 teaspoon salt 2 tablespoons flour
¼ teaspoon paprika ½ cup cooked rice

Simmer tomatoes, seasonings, and water half an hour;[Pg 32] press through a sieve, and add soda; melt bacon fat, and cook with flour until brown; add to soup, and stir until smooth; add rice, and serve.

49.—TOMATO BISQUE

2 cups tomatoes 1 teaspoon sugar
1 slice onion 1½ teaspoons salt
Bit of bay leaf 1/8 teaspoon pepper
2 cloves 3 cups hot milk
1 cup boiling water 2 tablespoons butter
¼ teaspoon soda 3 tablespoons flour

Simmer tomatoes, onion, bay leaf, cloves, and water for twenty minutes, and press through a sieve; add soda, sugar, salt, and pepper; thicken milk with butter and flour blended together, and add to tomato just before serving. Serve with croutons.

50.—TOMATO BOUILLON

1 can tomatoes ½ bay leaf
2 cups water 1½ teaspoons salt
½ cup onion Dash of cayenne
½ cup carrot 1 teaspoon sugar
1 cup celery tops 2 tablespoons tomato ketchup
6 cloves

Simmer all ingredients except tomato ketchup for half an hour, strain through double cheesecloth, add ketchup, and serve either very hot or very cold. The tomato pulp should be pressed through a sieve and used for flavoring other soups or sauces.[Pg 33]

51.—TOMATO AND OATMEAL SOUP

½ can tomatoes 1 teaspoon salt
3 cups hot water 1 teaspoon sugar
2 slices onion 1/8 teaspoon soda
¼ bay leaf 1/8 teaspoon pepper
3 cloves 1 teaspoon butter
½ cup rolled oats

Heat tomatoes, water, onion, bay leaf, and cloves to boiling point; add oatmeal gradually, and cook for forty-five minutes; press through a sieve; add seasonings and butter, and serve with croutons.

52.—TOMATO AND PEANUT SOUP

1½ cups stewed and strained tomatoes ¼ teaspoon paprika
½ cup peanut butter 2½ cups boiling water
¾ teaspoon salt

Add tomatoes gradually to peanut butter, and when smooth add seasonings and water; simmer ten minutes, and serve with croutons. Well seasoned soup stock may be substituted for the water; if so, use less salt.

53.—WINSOR SOUP

2 potatoes 1 tablespoon butter
1 white turnip 2 tablespoons flour
¼ cup celery tops 1½ teaspoons salt
2 slices onion 1/8 teaspoon pepper
2½ cups boiling water 2 tablespoons tomato ketchup
1½ cups hot milk

Pare and slice potatoes and turnip, add celery tops, onion, and boiling water, cook half an hour, and press through a sieve; add hot milk, thicken with butter and flour blended together, season, and serve with croutons.[Pg 34]

54.—VEGETABLE SOUP

½ cup leeks 1 cup half-inch potato cubes
½ cup carrots 1 cup hot milk
1 cup cabbage 1 teaspoon salt
2 tablespoons beef drippings ¼ teaspoon pepper
3 cups boiling water 1 tablespoon chopped parsley

Cut leeks into slices, carrots and cabbage into small pieces, or put through the food chopper, and cook in beef drippings for ten minutes, stirring often; add boiling water and potatoes, and cook twenty minutes, or until vegetables are tender; add milk and seasonings, and serve with croutons.[Pg 35]


CHAPTER VI

SOUPS AND STEWS WITH MEAT OR FISH

55.—CREAM OF CHICKEN SOUP

3 cups chicken stock Salt
1 slice onion 1/8 teaspoon pepper
¼ cup celery tops 2 tablespoons chicken fat or butter
1 cup hot milk 3 tablespoons flour

Cook stock, onion, and celery for fifteen minutes, and strain; add hot milk and seasonings, and thicken with chicken fat and flour blended together. The amount of salt will depend upon the quantity in the stock. Celery salt may be used in place of celery tops.

56.—CHICKEN AND OKRA SOUP

1 quart chicken stock 1 cup tomatoes
1 tablespoon grated onion ½ can okra
1/8 teaspoon celery salt 2 tablespoons rice
½ green pepper chopped

Heat stock to boiling point, add other ingredients, and simmer half an hour or until rice is tender. Add salt if necessary. Ham stock in place of chicken stock makes an excellent soup.[Pg 36]

57.—CLAM BISQUE

1 pint clams 1/8 teaspoon pepper
1 cup water 2 cups hot milk
1 slice onion 1 tablespoon butter
1/8 teaspoon soda 2 tablespoons flour
¼ teaspoon celery salt 1 teaspoon chopped parsley
1 teaspoon salt

Remove necks and gills from clams, and chop fine; simmer with the soft part of clams, water, and onion for fifteen minutes; add soda and seasonings; thicken the milk with the butter and flour cooked together; add to clams, sprinkle with parsley, and serve at once.

58.—CLAM BOUILLON

1 pint clams ¼ teaspoon celery salt
2 cups cold water Dash of cayenne
¾ teaspoon salt

Chop clams, add cold water, and simmer fifteen minutes; add seasonings, and strain through double cheesecloth. Serve in cups with or without whipped cream; or pour over the stiffly beaten white of one egg.

59.—CLEAR SOUP

¼ cup chopped carrot 1 quart boiling water
¼ cup chopped onion 1 teaspoon beef extract
¼ cup chopped turnip 1 teaspoon salt
2 cloves Dash of cayenne
Small bit bay leaf Few drops kitchen bouquet

Cook vegetables, cloves, bay leaf, and water for half an hour, and strain through double cheesecloth. Add extract, salt, cayenne, and kitchen bouquet. Four bouillon cubes may be used in place of extract, and the salt, cayenne, and bouquet omitted.[Pg 37]

60.—JULIENNE SOUP (Bouillon Cubes)

2 tablespoons onion ¼ teaspoon salt
2 tablespoons carrot 4 cups boiling water
2 tablespoons white turnip 3 bouillon cubes

Cut vegetables into fine shreds an inch long, add salt and boiling water, and cook until tender; add bouillon cubes, and salt if necessary. Two tablespoons of tomato ketchup may be added.

61.—MOCK TURTLE SOUP

2 pounds knuckle of veal 1/8 teaspoon pepper
½ pound liver 2 tablespoons beef drippings
1 onion 4 tablespoons flour
1 carrot 1 teaspoon sugar
½ bay leaf 1 tablespoon vinegar
½ cup celery tops ¼ teaspoon kitchen bouquet
2 quarts water 1 hard-cooked egg
2 teaspoons salt

Wash meat, add vegetables cut fine, and boiling water, and cook slowly for four hours; remove meat, strain stock, remove fat, and add salt and pepper; cook drippings, flour, and sugar together until brown; add to stock, and stir until smooth; add vinegar, kitchen bouquet, and one-half cup each of liver and veal cut in small pieces. Serve a slice of egg in each plate. The left-over meat may be used for hash, croquettes, etc.

62.—MUSHROOM SOUP

¼ pound mushrooms 1/8 teaspoon pepper
3 cups stock Salt
1 slice onion 2 tablespoons butter
1 cup hot milk 4 tablespoons flour

Wash mushrooms, chop stems, simmer with stock and onion for twenty minutes, and press through a sieve,[Pg 38] reserving two or three whole caps; add milk, pepper, and salt if necessary; thicken with butter and flour blended together. Cut mushroom caps into bits, and add to soup.

63.—ONION SOUP

1 slice bacon 2 cups hot milk
3 onions sliced 1 teaspoon salt
½ green pepper chopped fine Dash of cayenne
1 sprig parsley 1 tablespoon bacon fat
1 clove 2 tablespoons flour
2 cups boiling water 2 tablespoons grated cheese

Cut bacon in small pieces and cook with onions and green pepper five minutes; add parsley, clove, and boiling water; simmer half an hour, and press through a sieve; add milk and seasonings, and thicken with bacon fat and flour blended together; add cheese just before serving.

64.—OYSTER STEW

1 quart oysters ¼ teaspoon paprika
1 quart milk 2 tablespoons butter
1½ teaspoons salt

Pick over oysters to remove bits of shell, and cook in their own liquor until plump, skimming when necessary; scald milk, add seasonings and butter, and mix with oysters. Serve with oyster crackers.

65.—OYSTER AND CELERY BOUILLON

1 cup chopped celery tops 1 pint small oysters
1 slice onion 1 teaspoon salt
½ bay leaf ¼ teaspoon paprika
3 cups boiling water White of 1 egg

Simmer celery, onion, bay leaf, and water for fifteen minutes; add oysters finely chopped, and simmer ten[Pg 39] minutes; strain through double cheesecloth; season with salt and paprika, and pour over the stiffly beaten white of egg. Serve in cups. Or serve without the egg, put a spoonful of whipped cream in each cup, and sprinkle with paprika.

66.—SALMON BISQUE

1 small can salmon 1 tablespoon butter
2 cups water 2 tablespoons flour
1 slice onion 1 teaspoon salt
Bit of bay leaf 1/8 teaspoon pepper
2 cups hot milk

Separate salmon into flakes, add water, onion, and bay leaf; simmer for fifteen minutes, and remove onion and bay leaf; scald milk, thicken with butter and flour blended together; add seasonings, and mix with salmon. Serve with oyster crackers.

67.—SOUP STOCK

Use the liquid in which any meat has been cooked. Season well with vegetables; if brown stock is wanted, add a small amount of kitchen bouquet or caramel, and a little beef or vegetable extract. (See suggestions for the Stock Pot, page 4.)

68.—TOMATO TAPIOCA SOUP

2 cups tomato 1¼ teaspoons salt
3 cups hot water ¼ teaspoon pepper
1 slice onion 1 teaspoon sugar
½ bay leaf 2 cubes beef extract
4 cloves 2 tablespoons granulated tapioca

Mix the tomato and seasonings with the hot water; simmer for fifteen minutes, and rub through a sieve; add beef extract and tapioca, and cook fifteen minutes. Serve with croutons.[Pg 40]

69.—TUNA FISH SOUP

2 tablespoons grated carrot ¼ teaspoon paprika
1 tablespoon grated onion 1 teaspoon chopped parsley
2 cups boiling water ½ teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
2 cups hot milk 1 cup tuna fish
¼ cup sifted crumbs ½ tablespoon butter
1 teaspoon salt

Cook vegetables, water, and milk in the double boiler for twenty minutes; add crumbs, seasonings, tuna fish separated into flakes, and butter; cook five minutes.

70.—BEEF STEW

2 pounds shoulder trimmings 3 potatoes sliced
2 quarts boiling water 1 cup tomatoes
1 onion 2½ teaspoons salt
1 carrot 1/8 teaspoon pepper
1 white turnip 1/3 cup flour

Cut beef in pieces for serving, add water, and simmer two hours; put onion, carrot, and turnip through the food chopper, using coarse cutter, and add to meat; add potatoes, tomatoes, and seasonings, and cook forty-five minutes; thicken with flour mixed to a paste with cold water. Serve with Dumplings (see No. 72).

71.—IRISH STEW WITH DUMPLINGS

2 pounds forequarter lamb 1 carrot
2 quarts boiling water 1 small white turnip
2 teaspoons salt 4 potatoes
1/8 teaspoon pepper 4 tablespoons flour
1 onion

Cut meat in small pieces, and trim off most of fat; cover with boiling water, and simmer for one hour; add salt and[Pg 41] pepper, onion, carrot, and turnip cut in small cubes, and cook one hour; pare and slice potatoes, add to stew, and cook twenty minutes; thicken with flour mixed to a paste with cold water; add Dumplings (see No. 72), cover, and cook twelve minutes.

72.—DUMPLINGS

1 cup flour 2 teaspoons baking powder
¼ teaspoon salt ½ cup milk or water

Sift flour, salt, and baking powder, and mix to a soft dough with milk; drop by spoonfuls upon boiling stew; cover closely, and cook twelve minutes.

73.—LAMB BROTH WITH SPAGHETTI

1 quart lamb stock 1/8 teaspoon pepper
½ cup tomato 1/3 cup spaghetti
1 tablespoon chopped onion 1 cup bits of lamb
1 tablespoon chopped carrot

Remove fat from stock; add vegetables, pepper, and (if necessary) salt; heat to boiling point, add spaghetti, and cook half an hour. Add meat just before serving.

74.—SCOTCH BROTH

2 pounds neck of mutton 2 white turnips
2½ quarts cold water 2 carrots
¼ cup pearl barley 2 teaspoons salt
2 onions ¼ teaspoon pepper

Wash mutton, cover with cold water, heat to boiling point, and simmer slowly for two hours; let stand over night. Soak barley in cold water over night. In the morning, remove fat from stock, remove meat from bones,[Pg 42] and strain stock; if water has evaporated, add enough to make two and a half quarts; heat stock to boiling point, add seasonings, barley, and vegetables, which have been pared and cut into small cubes. Cook for one hour, add meat, and cook slowly one hour longer.[Pg 43]


CHAPTER VII

CHOWDERS

75.—CLAM CHOWDER

1/3 cup half-inch cubes salt pork 1½ teaspoons salt
1 onion sliced 1/8 teaspoon pepper
2 cups boiling water 3 cups hot milk
4 cups potatoes cut in half-inch cubes ¼ cup sifted crumbs
1 quart clams

Cook salt pork and onion slowly for ten minutes; add boiling water, and strain into chowder kettle; add potatoes, and cook twenty minutes; remove necks of clams, chop fine, add with the soft part to the potatoes, and cook ten minutes; add seasonings, hot milk, and crumbs, and serve with pilot crackers. The salt pork and onion may be served in the chowder if preferred.

76.—CORN CHOWDER

1/3 cup half-inch cubes salt pork 1½ teaspoons salt
1 onion sliced ¼ teaspoon paprika
3 cups boiling water 1 can corn chopped
3 cups thinly sliced potatoes 2 cups hot milk
¼ teaspoon celery salt 6 common crackers split

Cook salt pork and onion together slowly for ten minutes; add boiling water, and strain into chowder kettle; add potatoes and seasonings, and cook about fifteen minutes or until potatoes are tender; put corn into a strainer,[Pg 44] drain the juice into the kettle, and chop the corn, using finest cutter; add to chowder; add hot milk and crackers; and cook five minutes. The bits of pork and onion may be left in the chowder if desired.

77.—CORN AND TOMATO CHOWDER

¼ pound salt pork chopped fine ¼ teaspoon pepper
1 onion chopped fine ½ can corn
1 green pepper shredded 2 cups hot milk
3 cups boiling water 1 tablespoon butter
½ can tomatoes 2 tablespoons flour
3 potatoes sliced 6 common crackers split
2 teaspoons salt

Cook pork, onion, and pepper slowly for ten minutes; add water, tomatoes, potatoes, salt, and pepper, and cook until potatoes are tender; add corn and milk, and thicken with butter and flour blended together. Add crackers (which have been moistened in cold water), and simmer for five minutes.

78.—FISH CHOWDER

3 pounds haddock 1/8 teaspoon pepper
½ cup half-inch cubes salt pork 1 tablespoon butter
1 onion sliced 3 tablespoons flour
1 quart cold water 2 cups hot milk
4 cups thinly sliced potatoes 6 common crackers split
2 teaspoons salt

Order skin and bones removed from fish at market, and have them delivered with fish and head; cook salt pork and onion together slowly for ten minutes; add fish head, skin, and bones, cover with cold water; cook for twenty minutes, and strain into chowder kettle; add the fish (cut in two-inch pieces), potatoes, salt, and pepper, and cook[Pg 45] twenty minutes; thicken milk with butter and flour blended together, and mix with chowder; add crackers (which have been moistened in cold water), and cover for five minutes. Cod, hake, white fish, or any firm fish may be used in place of haddock.

79.—OYSTER CHOWDER

3 potatoes cut in half-inch cubes 1 pint small oysters
1 onion chopped fine 1½ teaspoons salt
¼ cup celery chopped fine 1/8 teaspoon pepper
2 tablespoons bacon fat 2 cups hot milk
3 cups boiling water ¼ cup sifted crumbs

Cook potatoes, onion, celery, and bacon fat in boiling water for fifteen minutes; add oysters, salt and pepper, and cook five minutes; skim; add hot milk and crumbs, and serve with pilot crackers.

80.—POTATO CHOWDER

Follow recipe for Corn Chowder (see No. 76), cooking one-half cup of finely chopped carrot with the potatoes, and leaving out the corn.

81.—SALMON CHOWDER

1/3 cup half-inch cubes salt pork 3 cups hot milk
1 onion sliced 1 can salmon
3 cups boiling water 2 tablespoons sifted crumbs
4 potatoes cut in half-inch cubes 1 beaten egg
1½ teaspoons salt ½ teaspoon salt
¼ teaspoon paprika 1/8 teaspoon pepper
1/3 cup flour ¼ teaspoon onion juice

Cook salt pork and onion slowly for ten minutes; add boiling water, and strain into chowder kettle; add potatoes[Pg 46] and seasonings, and cook twenty minutes; mix flour to a smooth paste with cold water; add to milk, cook five minutes, and add to potatoes. Chop the salmon, add crumbs, egg, salt, pepper, and onion juice, and mix well; shape into balls about an inch in diameter, add to chowder, and cook ten minutes. Serve with pilot crackers.

82.—SALT FISH CHOWDER

Follow recipe for Corn Chowder (see No. 76), using one cup flaked salt fish in place of corn. The fish should be soaked in cold water for one hour, drained, and simmered in the chowder five minutes.

83.—VEGETABLE CHOWDER

1/3 cup half-inch cubes salt pork 1 quart boiling water
1 onion finely chopped 3 cups hot milk
1½ cups half-inch potato cubes 2 teaspoons salt
1 cup half-inch parsnip cubes ¼ teaspoon pepper
½ cup carrot chopped ¼ cup dried bread crumbs
½ cup white turnip chopped 1 teaspoon chopped parsley

Cook pork and onion five minutes; add vegetables and water, and cook about twenty minutes or until vegetables are tender; add milk, seasonings, crumbs, and parsley. Four common crackers, split, may be used in place of bread crumbs.[Pg 47]


CHAPTER VIII

FISH[6]

84.—BAKED COD STEAKS

Wash and dry four slices of cod steak, season with salt and pepper, put in baking pan, and pour around them one-half cup of water and one tablespoon of shortening; bake twenty-five minutes, basting often. Remove skin and bone, and pour over fish either Cheese Sauce (see No. 188) or Egg Sauce (see No. 195). Sliced halibut may be baked in the same way.

85.—BAKED STUFFED HADDOCK

Wash and dry a three-pound fish, fill with Fish Stuffing (see No. 210), and sew together. Place on a rack in a dripping pan, season with salt and pepper, dredge with flour, and cover with thin slices of salt pork; bake in a hot oven forty-five minutes, basting often. Until pork begins to try out, baste with two tablespoons of drippings melted in quarter of a cup of boiling water. Serve with Egg Sauce (see No. 195) and French Fried Potatoes (see No. 270).

86.—BOILED HALIBUT

Order two pounds of halibut cut near the tail; wash, cover with boiling water, add one tablespoon each of salt and vinegar, and boil about twenty-five minutes, skimming[Pg 48] when necessary; drain, remove skin, and serve with Egg Sauce (see No. 195) or Cheese Sauce (see No. 188).

87.—FRIED FILLETS OF FLOUNDER

Have skin and bone removed from two medium-sized flounders; divide each piece of fish lengthwise, making eight fillets; wash and dry, brush with melted butter, and season with salt and pepper; roll, fasten with skewers, roll in flour, dip in egg, roll in crumbs, and fry in deep fat from five to seven minutes. Serve with Sauce Tartare (see No. 202).

88.—FISH SAUTÉED WITH SALT PORK

Cut one-quarter pound of salt pork in thin slices, try out in frying pan, and remove scraps to platter. Cut cod, haddock, white fish, or any similar fish into one-inch slices; wash, season with salt and pepper, dip in corn meal, and sauté on each side in pork fat about seven minutes, or until brown.

89.—BROILED OYSTERS

Select large oysters, season lightly with salt and pepper, dip in melted butter, and then in cracker crumbs. Place on a well-greased oyster broiler, and broil about three or four minutes, turning often. Serve very hot with lemon butter.

90.—OYSTERS WITH BROWN SAUCE

1 pint oysters 1/8 teaspoon celery salt
3 tablespoons bacon fat 1/8 teaspoon pepper
5 tablespoons flour ¼ teaspoon kitchen bouquet
Stock or milk 1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
½ teaspoon salt

Cook oysters until edges ruffle; drain, and save the liquor; melt bacon fat, add flour, and stir until brown; to[Pg 49] the oyster liquor add enough milk or stock to make two cups; add to flour and fat, and stir until smooth; add seasonings and oysters, stir until hot, and serve on toast or in Croustades (see No. 473) or Patty Shells (see No. 621).

91.—CREAMED OYSTERS

1 pint small oysters ¾ teaspoon salt
2½ tablespoons butter ¼ teaspoon paprika
5 tablespoons flour ¼ teaspoon celery salt
Milk

Cook oysters in their own liquor until plump; drain, and measure the liquor; melt butter, add flour, and blend well; add oyster liquor, and enough milk to make two cups; stir until smooth, add seasonings and oysters, and serve on toast. Garnish with toast points and sliced pickles.

92.—CREAMED OYSTER PIE

Bake a Pie Shell (see No. 622), fill with Creamed Oysters (see No. 91), and cover with a meringue made of the stiffly beaten whites of two eggs, one teaspoon sugar, one-eighth teaspoon salt, two small sour pickles, and one canned sweet pepper (pickles and pepper wiped dry and chopped fine). Bake in a moderate oven about ten minutes, or until meringue is well risen and brown.

93.—OYSTERS AND MACARONI

Arrange two cups of cooked macaroni and one pint of small oysters in layers in a buttered baking dish; season each layer with salt and pepper, and dredge with flour; cover with Buttered Crumbs (see No. 472), and bake in a hot oven twenty minutes. One-fourth cup of grated cheese may be added.[Pg 50]

94.—OYSTER SHORTCAKE

Follow recipe for Shortcake (see No. 441); fill, and cover top with Creamed Oysters (see No. 91). Garnish with parsley and thin slices of lemon.

95.—PANNED OYSTERS

Heat and butter individual egg shirrers, or other fireproof dishes which can be sent to the table; put in a piece of buttered toast, cover with oysters, season lightly with salt and pepper, and bake in a hot oven about ten minutes, or until the edges ruffle. Garnish with toast points and lemon, and serve very hot.

WARMED-OVER FISH

96.—CREAMED FISH

1 cup milk 2 tablespoons flour
1 slice onion ½ teaspoon salt
1 slice carrot 1/8 teaspoon pepper
Bit of bay leaf 1½ cups flaked fish
1 tablespoon butter ½ cup buttered crumbs

Scald milk with onion, carrot, and bay leaf for fifteen minutes; strain; melt butter, add flour, and blend well; add milk, and stir until smooth; add seasonings and fish; turn into a greased baking dish, cover with crumbs, and bake in a hot oven fifteen minutes. Or arrange a border of mashed potato on a platter, and turn the creamed fish into the center, omitting the crumbs.

97.—FISH AND POTATO PIE

Line a deep greased dish with well-seasoned mashed potato to a thickness of one inch; fill to within one inch[Pg 51] of the top with Creamed Fish (see No. 96); cover with potato, brush with melted butter, and bake in a hot oven until brown. Garnish with parsley and lemon.

98.—FISH TIMBALES

1½ cups hot milk ½ teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon butter ½ teaspoon grated onion
4 cup dried and sifted bread crumbs 1 beaten egg
¼ teaspoon paprika 1½ cups cold flaked fish

Scald milk, add other ingredients in order given; turn into greased individual molds and bake in a slow oven until firm; turn out upon serving dish and pour around them Cheese Sauce (see No. 188).

99.—CREOLE SALMON

2 tablespoons bacon fat 1 cup hot milk
1 green pepper finely chopped ¼ teaspoon paprika
1 onion finely chopped ½ teaspoon salt
½ cup tomato 1 can salmon
1/8 teaspoon soda

Cook pepper and onion in bacon fat for five minutes; mix tomato and soda, and add to vegetables; bring to boiling point, and add seasonings and milk; add salmon, which has been rinsed with hot water and separated into flakes. Serve with a border of boiled rice.

100.—DUTCH SALMON

2 tablespoons bacon fat 1 teaspoon salt
4 cups cabbage coarsely chopped 1/8 teaspoon pepper
¼ cup boiling water 1 can salmon

Heat bacon fat in frying pan, add cabbage, and cook five minutes, stirring frequently; add water and seasonings,[Pg 52] and cook fifteen minutes or until cabbage is tender. Rinse salmon with hot water, separate into flakes, and add to cabbage.

101.—SALMON LOAF

1 cup dried bread crumbs 1 cup boiling water
1 teaspoon salt 1 beaten egg
¼ teaspoon pepper 1 can salmon flaked
1 teaspoon onion juice

Mix in order given, put in greased mold, and steam one-half hour. Serve with white sauce to which has been added the juice of half a lemon. To free salmon of the oily taste, place in a sieve, and rinse with hot water before flaking. Tuna fish may be used in place of salmon.

102.—SALMON AND PEAS SOUFFLÉ

1 cup hot milk ¼ teaspoon paprika
¾ cup soft bread crumbs 1½ cups flaked salmon
1 tablespoon butter ½ cup peas
½ teaspoon salt Whites of 2 eggs

Cook crumbs, butter, and seasonings in the hot milk for three minutes; add the salmon and peas; fold in the whites of the eggs, which have been beaten very stiff; put in a greased baking dish, and bake about twenty-five minutes in a moderate oven.

103.—FRIED SCALLOPS

Wash one pint of deep sea scallops, and cut each scallop into quarters; scald with boiling water, drain, season with salt and pepper, dredge with flour, dip in egg, and then in crumbs, and fry in deep fat about two minutes; drain on soft paper, and serve with Sauce Tartare (see No. 202).[Pg 53]

104.—LOUISIANA SHRIMPS AND RICE

2 tablespoons beef drippings 1 teaspoon salt
1 onion finely chopped ¼ teaspoon paprika
3 tablespoons flour 2 cups cooked rice
1 cup stewed and strained tomato 1 cup cooked shrimps cut in pieces
1½ cups stock or water

Cook onion in fat for five minutes, add flour, and stir until well blended; add tomatoes and stock, and stir until smooth; add seasonings, rice, and shrimps.

SALT AND SMOKED FISH

105.—FINNAN HADDIE BAKED IN MILK

Wash fish, and soak in lukewarm water for half an hour; put in baking pan, add one-half cup each of milk and water, and bake about twenty-five minutes, basting often. Remove to platter, spread with butter, and strain liquid in the pan over fish.

106.—BAKED HERRING

Arrange smoked, boned herring on pieces of entire wheat bread; place on platter, and pour hot milk over them, allowing three-quarters of a cup for six slices of bread. Brown in a hot oven.

107.—BAKED SALT MACKEREL (Spiced)

Soak mackerel in cold water for twelve hours; drain, and rinse with cold water. Place in a granite baking pan, sprinkle with one-fourth teaspoon each of clove, allspice, cinnamon, and pepper; add one-half cup each of vinegar and water; bake in a moderate oven one hour, basting frequently.[Pg 54]

108.—SALT FISH BAKED WITH CRACKERS

1 cup flaked fish 2 cups milk
4 butter crackers 1 tablespoon butter
Cold water A few grains pepper
1 egg slightly beaten

Split crackers, put with fish in a baking dish, cover with cold water, and soak over night or for several hours; drain, press out water, add other ingredients, and bake about twenty-five minutes in a moderate oven.

109.—BROILED FINNAN HADDIE

Wash well, and soak in lukewarm water half an hour; dry, brush with melted butter, and broil for fifteen minutes, turning often; spread with butter, sprinkle with lemon juice, and serve very hot.

110.—BROILED SALT CODFISH

Select thick pieces of fish, and soak over night in cold water; drain, dry, brush with melted butter, and broil over a moderate fire ten minutes, turning often. Spread with soft butter.

111.—BROILED SMOKED HERRING

Soak herring in cold water half an hour; drain, pour boiling water over skin side, and soak for ten minutes; remove skin, place on a greased broiler, and cook over a clear fire about eight minutes, turning frequently; spread with a little Mustard Butter (see No. 459), and sprinkle with lemon juice.

112.—BROILED SMOKED SALMON

Soak salmon in cold water for twenty-four hours, changing the water once; drain, dry, place on a greased broiler,[Pg 55] and broil over a moderate fire about five minutes on each side, turning often. Spread with soft butter and sprinkle with lemon juice.

113.—CREAMED CODFISH

1½ cups hot milk 1 cup salt codfish flaked
3 tablespoons flour ½ tablespoon butter
1/8 teaspoon pepper

Thicken milk with flour which has been mixed to a paste with cold water, add pepper, and cook fifteen minutes; soak codfish for two hours in lukewarm water, separate into small flakes, add to sauce, and simmer five minutes; add butter just before serving. One beaten egg or one hard-cooked egg chopped may be added. Serve with baked potatoes.

114.—FISH CAKES WITH PORK SCRAPS

1 package shredded codfish 1 egg well beaten
2 cups hot mashed potato 2 tablespoons milk
1/8 teaspoon pepper ¼ pound salt pork

Soak fish in lukewarm water fifteen minutes; drain, and squeeze in cheesecloth; add potato, pepper, egg, milk, and salt if necessary; beat well, shape into small flat cakes, and roll in flour; cut pork in thin slices, and try out in frying pan; when crisp, but not burnt, remove to platter; cook fish cakes in fat in pan until brown, and serve with a piece of pork on each.

115.—FISH BALLS

Follow recipe for Fish Cakes (see No. 114), but shape slightly with a tablespoon, and cook in deep fat one minute.[Pg 56]

116.—FISH HASH

Follow recipe for Fish Cakes (see No. 114), but omit the egg and add double the quantity of milk. Try out pork and remove scraps to platter; spread hash in frying pan with the fat, and stir well; cook slowly until well browned. Fold double, and serve with pork scraps.

117.—SALT CODFISH SOUFFLÉ

1 cup shredded codfish 2 tablespoons butter
2 cups mashed potato (hot or cold) Dash of pepper
Yolks of 2 eggs Whites of 2 eggs

Soak the fish in lukewarm water for ten minutes; drain and dry thoroughly; mix with the potato; add egg yolks, which have been beaten very light, and the butter and pepper. Beat well, and fold in the whites of the eggs, which have been beaten stiff and dry. Put in a greased baking dish, and bake about twenty minutes in a moderate oven. Half of a green pepper and a slice of onion may be chopped and cooked in the butter, and added to the potato and fish.

118.—SPANISH CODFISH

1 onion 1½ cups tomatoes
1 green pepper ¾ cup salt codfish
2 tablespoons bacon fat ¼ teaspoon salt

Chop onion and pepper, and cook in the bacon fat about five minutes; add the tomatoes and simmer ten minutes; add codfish, which has been flaked and freshened in lukewarm water, and salt if necessary. Simmer two minutes and serve with border of boiled rice.

[Pg 57]


CHAPTER IX

MEATS[7]

119.—PRESSED BEEF

Wash a four-pound piece of beef flank or any other of the cheaper cuts. Cover with boiling water, bring to boiling point, and skim; slice and add two carrots, two onions, and one white turnip; cook slowly for four hours or until meat is very tender; add two teaspoons of salt when half cooked; pack meat solidly into a deep bread pan, putting the grain of the meat lengthwise; place pan in a shallow pan to catch the overflow, put an empty bread pan on top of meat, and press with two heavy flatirons; let stand in a cool place over night. Strain the stock, and use for soups or sauces.

120.—PRESSED CORNED BEEF

Select a four-pound piece of shoulder or lean end of brisket lightly corned; wash well, cover with boiling water, and cook slowly for four hours; pack and press as for Pressed Beef (see No. 119). The heat should not be above the simmering point (185° F.): if the water boils the meat will be tough.[Pg 58]

121.—ROAST BEEF

The most economical cuts of beef for roasting are the shoulder, the face of the rump, and the chuck ribs; they are all of good flavor and fairly tender. When ordering a shoulder roast, have an inch slice cut off to broil. The chuck roast should be ordered boned and rolled, and the bones sent with it. Wipe beef with cheesecloth, place skin side down on a rack in a roasting pan suitable for the size of the roast; dust with salt and pepper, dredge with flour, and cook in a hot oven, basting every ten minutes. When half roasted, turn over, dredge with flour, and finish cooking. For a medium-cooked roast allow seventeen minutes for each pound of meat. The oven should be very hot for the first fifteen minutes, after which the heat should be reduced.

122.—POT ROAST OF BEEF

A small aitchbone or a solid piece from the shoulder weighing about five pounds makes an economical roast. Wash, dry, season with salt and pepper, dredge with flour, and brown quickly in a hot frying pan or Scotch kettle; place in kettle, half cover with water, cover closely, and cook slowly four hours; when half cooked, season with salt and pepper; add four small onions, two carrots, and one white turnip cut in quarters; when cooked place meat on platter with vegetables around it; remove fat from gravy, and thicken with flour mixed to a paste with cold water, allowing one-fourth cup of flour to two cups of gravy. Color with a few drops of kitchen bouquet if necessary.[Pg 59]

123.—SHIN OF BEEF WITH CREOLE SAUCE

4 pounds shin of beef ½ onion chopped
½ onion sliced ¼ teaspoon celery salt
½ carrot sliced ¼ teaspoon paprika
2 cups tomato ½ teaspoon salt
1 green pepper chopped 4 tablespoons dried bread crumbs

Wash meat, sprinkle with salt and pepper; put into an iron kettle or earthen crock; add onion and carrot; cover closely, and bake in a slow oven four hours. Remove meat from the bone; skim fat from stock. Cook tomatoes, pepper, onion, and seasonings twenty minutes; add stock, crumbs, and meat. The meat cooks in its own juice and will be very tender.

124.—STUFFED SHIN OF BEEF

4 pounds shin of beef 1 small white turnip
1 onion ½ teaspoon salt
1 carrot 1 quart boiling water

Have the bone removed and cracked; finely chop vegetables and stuff into beef; place on a trivet in kettle with the bone; add boiling water, and cook slowly for four hours. Skim when necessary. Remove meat, and thicken gravy with flour mixed to a paste with cold water, allowing one-fourth cup flour to two cups gravy. Color with a few drops of kitchen bouquet.

125.—TO BROIL STEAK

Wipe steak, trim off superfluous fat, place on a greased broiler with fat towards the handle, and broil over a clear fire or under a gas flame. Turn four or five times during the first minute, and then occasionally. For steak[Pg 60] an inch and a half thick, medium cooked, allow twelve minutes to broil. Season with salt and pepper, and spread with soft butter. A slice from the shoulder is a good and inexpensive cut.

126.—BROILED FLANK STEAK

Follow directions for broiling steak (see No. 125), but, as flank steak is thinner, broil only seven or eight minutes. Season with salt and pepper, spread with one tablespoon of soft butter and one tablespoon of tomato ketchup.

127.—STEAK COUNTRY STYLE

1½ pounds flank steak 1/3 teaspoon salt
4 onions 1/8 teaspoon pepper
1 tablespoon flour ¼ cup boiling water

Pound the steak with a meat pounder or a wooden potato masher to break the tough fibers. Sear quickly on each side in a very hot frying pan; peel and chop onions, dredge with flour, and put in pan with the steak; add salt and pepper; cover closely, and cook slowly an hour and a half. Put steak on platter, add boiling water to onions, and pour around steak. Serve with hashed brown potatoes.

128.—BROILED CHOPPED BEEF

Put one pound and a half of any of the cheaper cuts of beef through the meat chopper; season with pepper and salt, and pat lightly into a flat cake an inch thick; place carefully on a greased broiler, and broil about eight minutes for a medium-cooked steak. Spread with soft butter.[Pg 61]

129.—HAMBURG MEAT CAKES

1 pound beef 1 teaspoon salt
1 thin slice salt pork 1/8 teaspoon pepper
¼ cup dried crumbs ½ cup milk

Use any of the cheaper cuts of beef; put through the meat chopper with the salt pork, add crumbs, seasoning, and milk; mix well, shape into small flat cakes, roll in flour, and sauté slowly in beef drippings until brown, allowing ten minutes for each side. Remove meat to platter; add two tablespoons of flour to the fat in the pan, and stir until brown; add one-fourth teaspoon each of mustard, salt, and paprika, and one cup of boiling water. Stir until smooth, and pour around meat cakes. One teaspoon of grated onion may be added to meat.

130.—BEEF AND BACON CAKES

1 pound flank of beef ½ cup water
3 slices bacon ¼ teaspoon salt
¼ cup dried bread crumbs Dash of cayenne

Put meat and bacon through chopper; add crumbs, water, and seasonings; mix well, form into small flat cakes, and sauté in bacon fat.

131.—BEEF LOAF

2 pounds shoulder trimmings chopped 1½ teaspoons salt
¼ pound salt pork chopped 3 common crackers rolled fine
½ teaspoon pepper 1 cup milk

Mix in order given and bake in a deep pan about two hours in a slow oven. Serve hot with Tomato Sauce (see No. 203) or Creole Sauce (see No. 191), or serve cold, sliced. One teaspoon of poultry seasoning may be added if desired.[Pg 62]

132.—CASSEROLE OF BEEF

1 pound of shoulder trimmings 1 tablespoon pearl tapioca
1 tablespoon flour 1¼ teaspoons salt
2 potatoes ¼ teaspoon paprika
1 carrot 1 tablespoon tomato ketchup
1 onion Cold water

Cut beef into inch pieces, sear quickly in hot frying pan, dredge with flour, and put into casserole; cut potatoes into cubes or balls; put carrot and onion through meat chopper; mix vegetables, and add to meat; add tapioca and seasonings, cover with cold water (a little of the water should be put into the frying pan to obtain all the flavor of the meat, and then added to the rest). Cover, and bake slowly two and a half hours. Any of the other cheaper cuts of meat may be used. Serve with spinach or cold slaw.

133.—CREAMED DRIED BEEF WITH CHEESE

¼ pound dried beef 1 cup milk
1½ tablespoons butter 2 tablespoons grated cheese
2 tablespoons flour 2 tablespoons ketchup

Cut beef in small pieces, cover with boiling water, let stand five minutes, and drain; melt butter, add beef, and stir until hot; add flour and milk, and stir until smooth; add cheese and ketchup, and stir until cheese is melted. Serve with baked potatoes.

134.—AMERICAN CHOP SUEY

2 tablespoons bacon fat 1 cup cooked spaghetti
1 onion finely chopped ½ teaspoon salt
¾ pound flank beef chopped fine 1/8 teaspoon pepper
1 can condensed tomato soup

Cook onion and beef in fat until brown; add tomato, spaghetti, and seasonings, and simmer ten minutes.[Pg 63]

135.—BROWN FRICASSEE OF LAMB

2 pounds forequarter lamb 2 white turnips
2 quarts boiling water 2 carrots
1½ teaspoons salt 5 tablespoons flour
2 onions ¼ teaspoon kitchen bouquet

Cut lamb in pieces the size of a chop, trim off nearly all fat, add boiling water, heat to boiling point, and skim; add salt and vegetables (left whole), and simmer for two hours; remove meat, season with salt and pepper, dredge with flour, and sauté with two tablespoons of fat in a hot frying pan until brown; to the fat in the pan add the flour, and stir until brown, add two cups of stock, and stir until smooth; color with kitchen bouquet, add pepper, and salt if necessary. Slice vegetables, and serve with meat. Use left-over stock for soups or sauces.

136.—CASSEROLE OF LAMB

1½ pounds forequarter lamb ¼ teaspoon pepper
½ cup each white turnip, carrot, and onion finely chopped 1½ teaspoons salt
1 cup tomato 3 cups hot water
2 tablespoons rolled oats

Remove fat and cut meat into inch pieces; put into a casserole with vegetables, oats, seasonings, and water, and cook in a moderate oven two hours.

137.—LAMB CHOPS

Chops from the forequarter are much cheaper than loin or kidney chops. They contain more bone, but are tender and of good flavor, if well cooked. Cook the same as Lamb Cutlets (see No. 138). The time of cooking may vary slightly according to the thickness of the meat.[Pg 64]

138.—LAMB CUTLETS

Have a small forequarter of lamb cut in pieces for serving; select the best pieces, trim, and skewer into shape. Season lightly with salt and pepper, dip in egg and crumbs, and fry in deep fat about seven minutes; or dip in flour, and sauté on each side about ten minutes; or broil on each side about five minutes. The rest of the forequarter can be used for fricassee, Scotch broth, croquettes, and many other dishes.

139.—ROLLED ROAST OF LAMB

Order a small forequarter of lamb boned and rolled; have the bones sent with the meat; wash bones and meat, put bones in kettle, put meat on top; add one sliced onion, one sliced carrot, one bay leaf, and a sprig of thyme. Cover with two quarts of boiling water, and simmer for two hours, skimming when necessary; add two teaspoons of salt after meat has cooked one hour. Remove meat to a roasting pan, sprinkle with salt and pepper, dredge with flour, and roast in a hot oven about half an hour. To the drippings in the pan add four tablespoons of flour and stir until brown; add one and a half cups of stock which has been strained and had fat removed; stir until smooth and serve with meat. The left-over stock should be used for soups and sauces. The forequarter of lamb, although quite fat, is tender and of good flavor, and costs much less than a leg of lamb.

140.—BROWN FRICASSEE OF FOWL

Clean, singe, and cut up a four-pound fowl, place in a kettle, cover with boiling water, add one whole onion, and one carrot cut in halves, and cook slowly for three hours,[Pg 65] or until tender; add two teaspoons of salt when half cooked; remove fowl, season with salt and pepper, dredge with flour, and brown in one-quarter of a pound of fat salt pork tried out in the frying pan. Remove fowl to platter, and make a sauce in the pan with four tablespoons of fat, five tablespoons of flour browned together, and two cups of stock. Pour over fowl, and garnish with toast points or small, thin baking powder biscuit. The remainder of the stock may be used for soup or sauce, or for Celery Toast (see No. 462).

141.—ROAST FOWL

Clean and singe a five-pound fowl; stuff with Bread Stuffing (see No. 208), truss, place on a trivet in a pan suited to the size of the fowl, dredge with flour, cover with thin slices of fat salt pork, and bake in a slow oven three hours, basting every fifteen minutes. Put into the pan the chicken fat (which was removed when cleaning) and use for basting. Dredge with flour twice while cooking. Cook the giblets in boiling water one hour, and chop fine; make a gravy in the pan, allowing four tablespoons each of fat and flour, and the water in which giblets were cooked, with enough boiling water added to make two cups; season with salt and pepper, and add the giblets. If cooked slowly and basted often, a fowl will be as tender as a chicken.

142.—CHICKEN PIE

Use the remnants of cold roast or fricasseed fowl. If roast fowl is used, make stock by covering bones and left-over gravy with cold water and simmering an hour or more; to three cups of stock add one-half onion chopped,[Pg 66] two potatoes cut in half-inch cubes, one teaspoon salt, and one-eighth teaspoon pepper, and boil fifteen minutes; thicken with one-half cup of flour mixed to a paste with cold water; put chicken in a baking dish, add stock and potato, and cover with small biscuit made by Baking Powder Biscuit (see No. 424) or Shortcake (see No. 441) recipes. Bake in a hot oven about twenty minutes or until biscuit are done. If the amount of chicken is scant, add one or two hard-cooked eggs sliced.

143.—POTTED PIGEONS

4 pigeons ½ teaspoon salt
Bread Stuffing (see No. 208) 1/8 teaspoon pepper
4 tablespoons bacon fat 2 cups boiling water
½ onion sliced 3 tablespoons flour
½ carrot sliced 4 tablespoons cold water
1 cup celery tops

Clean pigeons, wipe dry, stuff, and truss neatly into shape. Brown in hot bacon fat in the frying pan, and place in a casserole dish or bean pot; add vegetables, seasonings, and boiling water. Cover, and bake in a slow oven three hours. Remove pigeons to serving dish, thicken the stock with the flour mixed to a paste with cold water; cook ten minutes, strain, and pour over pigeons. The giblets may be cooked in boiling salted water about ten minutes, chopped, and added to the sauce.

144.—COUNTRY CLUB RABBIT

Cut a young rabbit in pieces for serving; sprinkle with salt and pepper; dip in flour, then in egg, and coat thickly with crumbs; put into a well-greased baking pan, and bake in a hot oven about half an hour, basting often with bacon fat. Arrange rabbit on serving dish, and make a[Pg 67] brown sauce in the pan, using three tablespoons each of bacon fat and flour, one teaspoon of grated onion, and one and one-half cups of stock, milk, or boiling water. Season with one-half teaspoon of salt, one-fourth teaspoon paprika, and two tablespoons tomato ketchup.

145.—CASSEROLE OF RABBIT AND OKRA

3 slices bacon ¼ teaspoon pepper
1 rabbit 2 cups boiling water
1 onion finely chopped 1 cup tomatoes
3 tablespoons flour 1 pint okra sliced
1¼ teaspoons salt

Cut bacon into one-inch pieces, and cook in frying pan until brown; remove bacon; cut rabbit in pieces for serving and soak half an hour in cold salted water; drain, dredge with flour, brown in bacon fat, and put with cooked bacon in a casserole dish; cook onion in bacon fat until brown; add flour, salt, pepper, and boiling water; stir until smooth, and pour over rabbit; add tomato and okra, sprinkle with salt; cover, and bake in a moderate oven one hour and a half.

146.—ROAST PORK

Have the bone removed from a six-pound fresh shoulder of pork; wash, dry, and stuff with Bread Stuffing (see No. 208) or Peanut Stuffing (see No. 211); season with salt and pepper, dredge with flour, and roast in a moderate oven about two and three-quarters hours. Baste often, and be sure oven is not too hot, as pork must cook slowly. This is an excellent cut, and less expensive than the loin or fresh leg. Strain the fat and add it to the frying fat, or use in place of lard. Have the bones sent and use for stock. Serve with Dark Red Apple Sauce (see No. 663).[Pg 68]

147.—PORK CHOPS BAKED WITH POTATOES

Pare potatoes, and cut in thin slices; wash, drain, season with salt and pepper, and put into a baking dish; cover with small pork chops from which part of the fat has been removed; dust with salt, pepper, and flour; add half a cup of boiling water, and bake in a hot oven about forty minutes. Turn chops when half cooked.

148.—SAUSAGE CAKES

½ pound sausage meat 1/3 cup hot water
1 teaspoon grated onion 1/3 cup sifted crumbs
¼ teaspoon salt

Mix well, shape into small flat cakes, roll in crumbs, and bake in a hot oven about twenty minutes, or until brown.

149.—SAUSAGE CAKES BAKED WITH APPLE

1 pound sausage meat 4 apples

Shape meat into small flat cakes, and put in the center of a dripping pan; core apples, cut into half-inch slices, and put around sausage. Bake in a hot oven until brown, basting frequently with the fat from the sausage.

150.—SAUSAGES WITH OYSTERS AND EGGS

4 small sausages 2 eggs slightly beaten
1 teaspoon grated onion ¼ teaspoon salt
1 cup small oysters

Cut sausages into half-inch bias slices, and cook with onion in a hot frying pan until brown; add oysters, and cook until edges ruffle; add eggs and salt, and scramble until firm.[Pg 69]

151.—BREAKFAST BACON

Lay slices of bacon close together on a fine wire broiler, place broiler over a dripping pan, and bake in a hot oven about ten minutes or until bacon is brown and crisp. Avoid burning. Save fat for cooking.

152.—BROILED HAM

Ham for broiling should be cut in very thin slices. Trim off superfluous fat, cover ham with lukewarm water, and stand on back of range for fifteen minutes; dry, and broil over clear fire until fat is brown.

153.—BAKED SLICED HAM

Order a small slice of ham cut an inch and a half thick; cover with warm water, and place on the back of the range for an hour. Drain ham, cover with a mixture of two tablespoons of flour, two tablespoons of brown sugar, one-half teaspoon of mustard, and a dash of cayenne. Put a few small bits of the fat on top, and bake twenty-five minutes in a moderate oven. Place ham on platter, pour off fat in the pan, add one-fourth cup of cider or weak vinegar; bring to boiling point, and pour around ham.

154.—HAM LOAF

1 pound raw ham 2 beaten eggs
1 cup dried crumbs ¼ teaspoon mustard
1 cup boiling water ¼ teaspoon salt

Put ham, including the fat, through meat chopper; add crumbs, water, eggs, and seasonings; mix well, and bake in a small bread pan, in a slow oven, an hour and a half; or cook in steamer two hours.[Pg 70]

155.—ROAST BREAST OF VEAL STUFFED

Have a pocket cut in veal, wash, dry, and stuff with Crust Stuffing (see No. 209); skewer neatly into shape, dredge with flour, season with salt and pepper, and cover with two thin slices of fat salt pork; place on rack in dripping pan, and roast in a moderate oven two hours, basting often. Serve with gravy made from drippings in the pan, three tablespoons of flour, and one and one-half cups of water. Season with salt and pepper, and strain.

156.—VEAL WITH VEGETABLES

3 pounds knuckle of veal 2 cups hot water
½ cup each of finely chopped onion, carrot, turnip, and celery 1¼ teaspoons salt
¼ cup pearl barley ¼ teaspoon paprika

Order veal cut in three-inch lengths; remove meat from bone, and put in a casserole dish; add vegetables, barley (which has been soaked for an hour in cold water), hot water, and seasonings; place the pieces of bone, cut edge down, on top; cover closely, and bake in a moderate oven two and a half hours. Remove the bones before serving.

157.—VEAL LOAF (Baked)

2½ pounds raw veal 1 cup dried and sifted crumbs
¼ pound salt pork ½ cup boiling water
½ teaspoon pepper ½ cup milk
2 teaspoons salt

Put veal and pork through the meat chopper; add pepper, salt, crumbs, water, and milk. Mix well, press into a deep pan, cover with paper, and bake slowly for two[Pg 71] hours. Serve hot or cold. A teaspoon each of poultry seasoning and grated onion may be added.

158.—VEAL LOAF (Boiled)

4 pounds knuckle of veal 4 cups hot water
1 onion ½ package gelatine
1 bay leaf ¼ cup cold water
4 cloves Juice of 1 lemon
2½ teaspoons salt 1 hard-boiled egg
½ teaspoon pepper 2 gherkins

Cook veal with seasonings in hot water until meat is very tender; strain, remove fat and bone, and chop meat; soak gelatine in cold water, add to strained stock in which meat was cooked, add meat and lemon juice, cool, and turn into deep pan which has been garnished with slices of hard-boiled egg and pickles sliced lengthwise. Put in the ice-box for several hours before serving.

159.—POTTED HEAD

1 calf's head ½ teaspoon paprika
1 pound lean fresh pork 1 teaspoon onion juice
6 cups boiling water 1 teaspoon poultry seasoning
1¾ teaspoons salt

Have head split and dressed at the market; singe, wash well, put in kettle with pork and boiling water, cover, and simmer three hours. Remove bones, and put meat through chopper; reduce stock to one and one-half cups, strain, and add, with seasonings, to the meat. Press into a bread pan and put in a cold place. Serve sliced cold, or dip slices in egg and crumbs, and fry in deep fat.[Pg 72]

160.—BRAISED LIVER

3 pounds liver ½ teaspoon salt
1½-inch cube salt pork 1/8 teaspoon pepper
1/3 cup onion finely chopped 2 cups boiling water
1/3 cup celery finely chopped ¼ cup flour
1/3 cup carrots finely chopped

Soak liver in cold salted water for half an hour, scald, remove skin, and dredge with flour; cut pork in thin slices, and try out in frying pan; brown liver in pork fat, and place in an earthen dish or kettle, add vegetables, seasonings, and water which has first been put in the frying pan; cover closely, and bake three hours in a slow oven, adding water if necessary; remove liver, and thicken gravy and vegetables with one-fourth cup of flour mixed to a paste with cold water.

161.—BROWN FRICASSEE OF LIVER

1 pound liver 4 tablespoons flour
2 cups boiling water ¾ teaspoon salt
2 tablespoons bacon fat ¼ teaspoon paprika
1 tablespoon grated onion 6 slices of toast

Cut liver into half-inch cubes, and soak in cold salted water fifteen minutes; drain; cover with the boiling water, and simmer six minutes; cook bacon fat, onion, and flour until brown; add seasonings, and stock in which liver was cooked; stir until smooth; add liver, and pour over toast or small, thin baking powder biscuit.

162.—CHICKEN LIVERS AND BACON

Cook chicken livers in boiling salted water fifteen minutes; put each liver on half of a slice of bacon, fold other half over liver, and bake in a hot oven until bacon is crisp;[Pg 73] moisten slices of toast with the stock in which livers were cooked, and serve two pieces of bacon and livers on toast for each person.

163.—FRIED LAMB'S LIVER AND BACON

Cut liver in one-third-inch slices; soak in cold water for half an hour; drain, dry, and cook in hot deep fat, with six slices of bacon, until brown.

164.—LAMBS' KIDNEYS IN BROWN SAUCE

6 lambs' kidneys ¼ teaspoon paprika
1½ cups boiling water ½ teaspoon onion juice
1½ tablespoons butter 1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
3 tablespoons flour Few drops kitchen bouquet
½ teaspoon salt 6 slices of toast

Split kidneys and soak in cold water half an hour; drain; cover with boiling water, and simmer five minutes; skim out of water, and cut in small dice; brown the butter, add the flour, and brown well; add the water in which the kidneys were cooked, and stir until smooth; add kidneys and seasonings, and serve on toast.

165.—DEVILLED KIDNEYS

6 lambs' kidneys, split 1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
3 tablespoons drippings 1 teaspoon mustard
1 tablespoon chopped onion ¼ teaspoon salt
3 tablespoons flour Dash of cayenne
1 cup water or stock

Scald, skin, and split kidneys; cook with fat and onion five minutes, and remove from the pan. To the fat in the pan add flour, and stir until brown; add liquid, and[Pg 74] stir until smooth; add seasonings and kidneys. Serve on toast or with mashed potato border.

166.—SPANISH TRIPE

1 pound fresh boiled tripe ½ cup chopped white cabbage
½ can tomatoes ¾ teaspoon salt
½ onion chopped Few grains cayenne
½ green pepper chopped 2 slices bacon

Cut tripe in small pieces for serving and put in greased casserole dish; scald tomatoes, add onion, pepper, cabbage, and seasonings; pour over tripe; cut bacon into bits, put on top, and bake in a moderate oven one hour.

167.—TRIPE FRIED IN BATTER

1 pound fresh boiled tripe 1 cup flour
1 slice onion 1½ teaspoons baking powder
2 cloves ¼ teaspoon salt
½ bay leaf 1 egg well beaten
1 tablespoon vinegar 1/3 cup water

Cut tripe in pieces the size of a large oyster, cover with boiling water, add seasonings, simmer fifteen minutes, and drain. Make a batter of flour, baking powder, salt, egg, and water. Dry each piece of tripe, dip in batter, and fry in deep fat for one minute. Serve with Sauce Tartare (see No. 202) or Russian Dressing (see No. 341).

168.—TRIPE FRIED IN CRUMBS

Prepare tripe as for Tripe Fried in Batter (see No. 167); dip each piece of tripe first in tomato ketchup, then in crumbs, then in beaten egg, and then in crumbs again. Fry in deep fat for one minute, and drain on soft paper.[Pg 75]

WARMED-OVER MEATS

169.—SAVORY BEEF

1½ cups tomatoes 1½ cups cold roast beef
1/3 cup beef gravy 2 cups cooked spaghetti
½ onion ½ cup bread crumbs
4 cloves 2 tablespoons beef drippings
1 teaspoon salt 1 tablespoon butter
1/8 teaspoon pepper

Simmer tomatoes, gravy, and seasonings for fifteen minutes, and press through a sieve; add beef cut in small pieces, and spaghetti, and pour into a greased baking dish; cover with crumbs which have been mixed with the drippings and butter melted together. Bake in a moderate oven about fifteen minutes. A can of condensed tomato soup may be used in place of the tomato sauce. Any meat may be used.

170.—SCALLOPED CORNED BEEF

2 tablespoons beef drippings 1 cup corned beef stock
5 tablespoons flour ¾ cup hot milk
1 teaspoon grated onion 1½ cups corned beef cut in half-inch cubes
¼ teaspoon paprika ½ cup Buttered Crumbs (see No. 472)
¼ teaspoon celery salt

Melt drippings, add flour, onion, and seasonings, and cook two minutes; add stock and milk, and stir until smooth; add meat, and put into a greased baking dish; cover with crumbs, and bake until crumbs are brown.[Pg 76]

171.—BAKED HAM AND POTATO

3 cups well-seasoned mashed potato 6 pimolas chopped
1 cup chopped cooked ham ½ cup hot milk
1 teaspoon grated onion ¼ cup crumbs
1 teaspoon chopped parsley 1 tablespoon bacon fat
½ teaspoon mustard

Mix potato, ham, seasonings, and milk, put into a greased baking dish, cover with crumbs which have been mixed with melted bacon fat, and bake in a hot oven until brown; or prepare half of mixture, spread in egg shirrers, make a depression with the back of a spoon, and into it carefully break an egg; cover with crumbs, and bake until egg is set.

172.—HAM MOUSSE

1½ cups chopped cooked ham 1 teaspoon mixed mustard
½ cup soft bread crumbs ¼ teaspoon paprika
1 tablespoon gelatine Whites of 2 eggs
1 cup hot milk

Mix ham with bread crumbs; dissolve the gelatine in the hot milk, and add to crumbs with mustard and paprika; beat the whites of eggs very stiff and fold lightly into mixture. Put into a deep pan or mold, and place on ice until firm. A little salt may be needed.

173.—CORNED BEEF HASH WITH BEETS

1½ cups corned beef ¾ teaspoon salt
2 cups cooked potatoes 1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
½ cup cooked beets ¼ cup stock or water
1 teaspoon grated onion 2 tablespoons beef drippings

Have meat, potatoes, and beets coarsely chopped; add seasonings and stock; melt fat in frying pan, and, when[Pg 77] very hot, add hash; cook slowly until a rich brown crust is formed; fold, and serve on a hot platter. If meat is very fat, use less fat in frying pan.

174.—SAVORY HASH (Baked)

1 cup cold meat cut fine 1 cup tomatoes
2 cups cold cooked potatoes ¾ teaspoon salt
½ onion finely chopped 1/8 teaspoon pepper
2 stalks celery chopped, or 2 tablespoons melted bacon fat or beef drippings
¼ teaspoon celery salt

Mix, and bake in casserole in moderate oven forty-five minutes.

175.—SOUTHERN HASH

4 raw potatoes ¾ cup stock or water
2 green peppers 1½ cups cold chopped beef
2 tomatoes Salt and pepper
1 onion Toast points

Put vegetables through the meat chopper, using coarse cutter; cook in the stock, covered, until tender; add beef, salt, and pepper, and when hot turn on a platter and garnish with toast points. If corned beef and stock are used, use salt with care.

176.—LIVER PATTIES

2 cups chopped cooked liver Salt and pepper
2 cups mashed potato Coarse stale bread crumbs
2 tablespoons finely chopped pickles

Mix liver, potato, and pickles, and season with salt and pepper. Grease patty pans or cups; sprinkle with crumbs, and fill with mixture. Bake fifteen minutes in[Pg 78] a hot oven, turn out on serving dish, and serve with Brown Sauce (see No. 185) or Tomato Sauce (see No. 203).

177.—MEAT AND TOMATO PIE

2 cups cooked meat cut in inch pieces ½ cup gravy or stock
1 can tomatoes drained ½ teaspoon onion juice
Salt and pepper 1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
¼ cup fine crumbs Quick Drop Biscuit (see No. 429)

In a deep dish arrange in alternate layers meat and tomatoes cut in pieces; season each layer with salt and pepper, and sprinkle with crumbs; add onion and Worcestershire sauce to gravy, and pour over all; bake twenty minutes in a hot oven; remove from oven, and drop biscuit mixture by spoonfuls on top; bake about fifteen minutes longer. Use tomato juice for soup or sauce.

178.—MEAT SOUFFLÉ

½ cup dry bread crumbs ½ onion chopped fine
1½ cups hot stock or milk 1½ teaspoons salt
1 tablespoon butter ½ teaspoon paprika
1½ cups chopped meat Yolks of 2 eggs
1 cup celery or white cabbage chopped fine Whites of 2 eggs

Mix in the order given, beating the yolks until thick and light, and the whites until very stiff. Bake in a moderate oven about half an hour. Any left-over meat may be used.[Pg 79]

179.—MEAT SHORTCAKE

1½ cups cooked meat chopped ¼ teaspoon paprika
½ cup celery tops chopped ½ teaspoon dry mustard
1 teaspoon grated onion 1 cup meat gravy or thickened stock
¼ teaspoon salt

Mix ingredients, simmer for fifteen minutes, and put between layers of Shortcake (see No. 441).

[Pg 80]


CHAPTER X

SAUCES AND STUFFINGS FOR FISH AND MEATS

180.—ANCHOVY SAUCE

Add to Drawn Butter (see No. 194) one and one-half teaspoons of anchovy paste and one tablespoon of lemon juice.

181.—BANANA SAUCE

2 bananas Few grains cayenne
1 tablespoon butter Few grains salt
1 teaspoon sugar 2 teaspoons Worcestershire sauce
Juice of ½ lemon 1 teaspoon horseradish

Peel and scrape bananas, and force through coarse sieve; melt butter, add sugar, lemon juice, seasonings, and bananas; stir until hot, and serve with cold roast beef.

182.—BECHAMEL SAUCE

1 cup white stock 2½ tablespoons flour
1 slice onion ½ teaspoon salt
1 slice carrot Few grains cayenne
Sprig of parsley 1 teaspoon butter
1 tablespoon shortening

Simmer stock, onion, carrot, and parsley fifteen minutes, and strain; melt shortening, add flour, and blend well; add stock and seasoning, and stir until smooth; add butter just before serving.[Pg 81]

183.—BLACK BUTTER

1/3 cup butter ¼ teaspoon onion juice
2 tablespoons vinegar ¼ teaspoon Worcestershire or Brand's A 1 sauce

Cook butter until brown, but do not burn; simmer vinegar, onion juice, and sauce five minutes, and add to butter. Serve with cauliflower, celery, fried eggs, or fish. A tablespoon of chopped capers or parsley may be added.

184.—BREAD SAUCE

1½ cups milk Sprig of parsley
½ onion ¼ teaspoon paprika
2 cloves ½ teaspoon salt
Bit of bay leaf 1/3 cup soft bread crumbs

Scald milk and seasonings, except salt, in double boiler half an hour, strain, add salt and soft crumbs, and simmer ten minutes.

185.—BROWN SAUCE

1 cup brown stock ¼ teaspoon salt
1 slice onion chopped 1/8 teaspoon pepper
1 slice carrot chopped 1½ tablespoons butter
1 sprig parsley 2½ tablespoons flour
2 cloves

Simmer stock, vegetables, and seasonings for fifteen minutes, and strain; brown the butter, add flour, and brown, add stock, and beat until smooth. Any stock may be colored with a few drops of kitchen bouquet, and used; or beef cubes or extract may be used with water instead of stock, but in that case less salt and pepper should be used.

186.—CAPER SAUCE

To recipe for Drawn Butter (see No. 194) add one-fourth cup of capers.[Pg 82]

187.—CELERY SAUCE

1 cup celery chopped 1/8 teaspoon pepper
1 teaspoon grated onion ½ cup milk
1 cup boiling water 1 tablespoon butter
¼ teaspoon salt 2 tablespoons flour

Simmer celery, onion, water, and salt for half an hour; add pepper and milk, and thicken with butter and flour creamed together.

188.—CHEESE SAUCE

1 tablespoon butter ¼ teaspoon salt
1½ tablespoons flour ¼ teaspoon mustard
1 cup milk ¼ teaspoon paprika
1/3 cup cheese cut fine

Melt butter, add flour, and blend well; add milk and stir until smooth; add cheese and seasonings, and stir until cheese is melted.

189.—CHEESE SAUCE WITH CHIVES

Follow directions for Cheese Sauce (see No. 188), and just before serving add one tablespoon of finely chopped chives. Serve with any white fish, or with plain omelet.

190.—CIDER SAUCE

2 tablespoons bacon fat ¼ teaspoon paprika
2 tablespoons flour 1/8 teaspoon salt
1 cup cider 1/8 teaspoon mustard

Blend bacon fat and flour, add cider, and stir until boiling point is reached; add seasonings and simmer one-half hour. Serve with roast pork or ham.[Pg 83]

191.—CREOLE SAUCE

½ can tomatoes 1 tablespoon flour
2 tablespoons bacon fat ¼ teaspoon salt
½ onion 1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
1 green pepper

Cook tomatoes until reduced to one cup; peel and finely chop onion; remove seeds and veins from pepper, chop, and cook with onion in bacon fat for ten minutes; add flour, salt, and Worcestershire sauce, and stir well; add tomato, and simmer five minutes.

192.—CROQUETTE SAUCE

3 tablespoons shortening ¼ teaspoon salt
1/3 cup bread flour 1/8 teaspoon pepper
1 cup milk

Proceed as for White Sauce (see No. 207). Stock may be used in place of milk, and the seasonings may be varied according to the croquette material, using a few drops of onion juice, a dash of nutmeg, cayenne, paprika, or a small quantity of table sauce or ketchup.

193.—CUCUMBER SAUCE

Pare and grate two small cucumbers, drain, and season with salt, pepper, and vinegar. Serve with fish.

194.—DRAWN BUTTER

2 tablespoons butter ¼ teaspoon salt
2 tablespoons flour 1/8 teaspoon pepper
1 cup hot water 1 teaspoon butter

Cook butter until it bubbles, stir in flour, add hot water, salt, and pepper, and beat until smooth; add butter in small pieces just before serving.[Pg 84]

195.—EGG SAUCE

Add to Drawn Butter (see No. 194) or White Sauce (see No. 207) one hard-cooked egg coarsely chopped.

196.—HOLLANDAISE SAUCE

¼ cup butter ½ cup hot water
1 tablespoon flour 1 egg yolk
½ teaspoon salt 1 tablespoon lemon juice
Few grains cayenne

Cream half of the butter with flour, salt, and cayenne; add hot water, and cook over hot water for ten minutes, stirring constantly until thickened; add egg yolk slightly beaten, lemon juice, and remainder of butter; cook about two minutes, or until thick; beat well, and serve at once.

197.—HORSERADISH SAUCE

To recipe for Bread Sauce (see No. 184) add one-third cup grated horseradish and the juice of half a lemon.

198.—MINT SAUCE

1 bunch mint 2 tablespoons sugar
¼ cup boiling water ¼ teaspoon salt
¼ cup vinegar Few grains cayenne

Wash and dry mint, pick leaves, and chop very fine, add other ingredients, put on back of range, and keep warm for half an hour.

199.—MUSHROOM SAUCE

Wash six mushroom caps, cut in small pieces, and simmer with one teaspoon of butter for ten minutes. Add to recipe for Brown Sauce (see No. 185), or to recipe for White Sauce (see No. 207). If the mushrooms are fresh and tender the stems may be used also.[Pg 85]

200.—MUSTARD PICKLE SAUCE

To Drawn Butter (see No. 194) add two tablespoons of mixed mustard pickles chopped.

201.—ORANGE MINT SAUCE

¼ cup vinegar 1 tablespoon sugar
4 cups orange juice ¼ cup mint leaves chopped
¼ teaspoon orange rind

Let stand on back of range for half an hour, and serve cold.

202.—SAUCE TARTARE

To one cup Mayonnaise Dressing (see No. 339) add three tablespoons finely chopped mixed pickles and one tablespoon finely chopped parsley.

203.—TOMATO SAUCE

1½ cups tomatoes ½ teaspoon salt
½ cup hot water ¼ teaspoon paprika
1 slice onion 2 tablespoons bacon fat
1 clove 4 tablespoons flour
1 teaspoon sugar

Simmer tomatoes, water, and seasonings for fifteen minutes, and press through a sieve; thicken with bacon fat and flour blended together, and cook five minutes. If tomatoes are very acid, add a pinch of soda.

204.—SAUCE FOR ROAST PORK OR GOOSE

Pour off most of fat in the pan, leaving two tablespoons; add three tablespoons of flour and one and a half cups of boiling water, and stir until smooth. Season with one-third teaspoon salt and one teaspoon each of mixed mustard, vinegar, and Brand's A 1 sauce.[Pg 86]

205.—SHARP SAUCE

1½ cups vinegar ½ teaspoon paprika
1 tart apple chopped fine 1½ teaspoons Worcestershire sauce
1 onion chopped fine 1½ cups brown sugar
¼ teaspoon salt 1½ teaspoons cornstarch

Heat vinegar, add apple, onion, and seasonings; when boiling stir in the sugar and cornstarch mixed together; cook fifteen minutes. Serve cold with ham or pork.

206.—SOUBISE SAUCE

Follow recipe for White Sauce (see No. 207), and add one-fourth cup of stock, and three onions which have been cooked until tender in boiling salted water and then drained and chopped.

207.—WHITE SAUCE

2 tablespoons shortening ¼ teaspoon salt
2 tablespoons flour 1/8 teaspoon pepper
1 cup milk

Melt shortening, add flour, and stir until well blended; add milk and seasonings, and beat with wire whisk until smooth. For a thin sauce, use one and one-half tablespoons flour.

208.—BREAD STUFFING

¼ cup beef drippings or bacon fat ¼ teaspoon pepper
1 teaspoon grated onion 2 teaspoons poultry seasoning
2 cups soft stale bread crumbs ½ cup boiling water
½ teaspoon salt

Melt fat in the frying pan, add onion and crumbs, and stir until crumbs begin to brown; add seasonings and boiling water; cool slightly before using.[Pg 87]

209.—CRUST STUFFING

3 cups bread crusts broken and dried in oven 1 tablespoon grated onion
½ teaspoon salt ¼ teaspoon pepper
¼ cup sausage fat 1 tablespoon poultry seasoning
1 cup boiling water

Put crusts in a bowl, add salt, sausage fat, and boiling water; let stand ten minutes; mix well, and add seasonings.

210.—FISH STUFFING (Bread)

2 tablespoons shortening 1 teaspoon grated onion
1 cup soft stale bread crumbs 1 teaspoon chopped parsley
¼ teaspoon salt 1 tablespoon chopped pickles
1/8 teaspoon pepper ¼ cup boiling water

Melt shortening, add crumbs, and stir until crumbs are golden brown, then add seasonings and water. The pickles may be omitted, or capers may be used in place of them.

211.—PEANUT STUFFING

1 cup dried bread crumbs ½ teaspoon salt
2/3 cup boiling water ¼ teaspoon paprika
2 tablespoons bacon fat 1 teaspoon grated onion
¾ cup shelled peanuts

Mix bread crumbs with boiling water and bacon fat, add peanuts finely chopped, and seasonings.[Pg 88]


CHAPTER XI

EGGS

212.—BOILED EGGS

For a soft-boiled egg, place egg in rapidly boiling water and boil from three to five minutes. For hard-boiled eggs, place in rapidly boiling water and boil twenty minutes, or cover with boiling water and cook in the double boiler one hour. For a soft-cooked egg, not boiled, place egg in a small saucepan of boiling water, cover, and let stand on back of range from six to eight minutes, when the albumen should be evenly coagulated throughout. The time for cooking in this way will depend upon the number of eggs to be cooked, the size of the saucepan, and the amount of boiling water. For uniform results, use medium-sized eggs, cook in the same pan, and measure the quantity of water each time. Thus you can find the exact time required to cook the eggs as desired.

213.—CREAMY EGGS ON TOAST

4 eggs 2 cups hot milk
2/3 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon butter
1/8 teaspoon pepper 4 slices toast

Beat eggs slightly, add salt and pepper, and stir into the hot milk; cook over hot water, stirring constantly until mixture is thick and creamy. Add butter, and serve on toast.[Pg 89]

214.—CREOLE EGGS

1 tablespoon butter 1 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon chopped onion 1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
1 tablespoon chopped green pepper 3 eggs
2 cups tomato 2 tablespoons cheese

Cook onion and pepper in butter for five minutes; add tomato and seasonings, and when thoroughly heated add the eggs unbeaten; pick up with a fork until eggs are nearly cooked; add cheese, and cook about one minute. Serve on toast, or with a border of boiled rice.

215.—EGGS WITH CHEESE AND SPAGHETTI

2½ tablespoons butter 1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
4 tablespoons flour ½ teaspoon onion juice
2 cups hot milk ½ cup cheese cut fine
¼ teaspoon paprika 1 cup cooked spaghetti
½ teaspoon salt 3 hard-cooked eggs sliced

Melt butter, add flour; when well blended add milk gradually and stir until smooth; add seasonings and cheese, and stir until cheese melts; add spaghetti and eggs, cook two minutes, and serve on toast or crackers.

216.—EGGS WITH HAM AND TOMATO

½ can tomatoes 3 beaten eggs
1 slice onion 1/8 teaspoon pepper
4 cloves ½ teaspoon salt
½ cup chopped cooked ham

Cook tomatoes, onion, and cloves fifteen minutes, and rub through a sieve; add ham, eggs, and seasonings, and cook three or four minutes, stirring all the time. Serve on toast or crackers.[Pg 90]

217.—BREAD OMELET

2 tablespoons bacon fat ½ teaspoon salt
¾ cup soft stale bread crumbs ¼ teaspoon paprika
¾ cup hot milk 3 eggs

Melt fat in frying pan, add bread crumbs, and stir until crumbs begin to brown; add hot milk, and let stand five minutes; add salt and paprika, and the yolks beaten until thick and light; fold in the stiffly beaten whites, pour into a hot greased omelet pan, and cook the same as Light Omelet (see No. 222).

218.—CREAMY OMELET

3 eggs 1/3 teaspoon salt
1 cup White Sauce (see No. 207) 1/8 teaspoon pepper

Beat yolks until thick and light; add to sauce and mix well; add salt and pepper to whites of eggs, beat until stiff and dry, and fold into sauce; pour into a hot greased omelet pan, and cook slowly until well risen and firm; put on oven grate for a minute or two to dry the top; fold, and turn on a hot platter.

219.—FRENCH OMELET

1 tablespoon butter or bacon fat 1/8 teaspoon pepper
4 eggs 1/3 cup hot water
½ teaspoon salt

Heat fat in the omelet pan; beat the eggs until yolks and whites are well mixed, but not light; add seasonings and hot water, pour into hot pan and cook slowly; pick up with fork while cooking, letting the uncooked mixture run into the place of the cooked; when firm and lightly browned, fold double, and serve plain on a hot platter;[Pg 91] or spread before folding with left-over bits of meat chopped, such as ham, bacon, or sausage, or with grated cheese or jelly.

220.—FRENCH CHEESE OMELET

4 eggs slightly beaten ½ cup hot water
½ teaspoon salt ½ cup grated cheese
1/8 teaspoon pepper

Mix in order given, pour into a hot greased omelet pan; as mixture thickens, pick up with a fork, letting the uncooked part take the place of the cooked; when firm, fold, and serve on a hot platter.

221.—HAM OMELET

½ cup stale bread crumbs 1/8 teaspoon pepper
½ cup hot milk 3 eggs
1 tablespoon butter ½ cup cooked ham finely chopped
½ teaspoon salt

Mix crumbs, milk, butter, and seasonings, and let stand five minutes; add egg yolks beaten until thick and light; add the meat, and fold in the whites of eggs beaten stiff; pour into a hot greased omelet pan and cook slowly until firm; fold, and serve at once. A white sauce or tomato sauce may be served around it. A few pieces of cooked bacon chopped fine may be used instead of ham.

222.—LIGHT OMELET

1 tablespoon bacon fat 1/8 teaspoon pepper
Yolks of 4 eggs 1/3 cup hot water
½ teaspoon salt Whites of 4 eggs

Put fat in omelet pan; beat yolks until light and thick, add seasonings and hot water; fold in the stiffly beaten whites, and pour into the hot omelet pan; cook slowly until well risen and firm, or about twelve minutes, placing[Pg 92] the pan on the upper grate in the oven for the last two minutes. When firm in the center, fold double, turn on a hot platter, and serve at once, either plain or with sauce. The omelet must be cooked slowly so that it will be firm throughout, and not fall.

White Sauce (see No. 207), either plain or with bits of cold meat, oysters, peas, or other left-over vegetables, or Brown Sauce (see No. 185) with a few mushrooms or chopped kidneys (see No. 164), or almost any savory sauce, improves an omelet, and also makes it go further.

223.—SALMON OMELET

1 tablespoon butter ½ teaspoon salt
2 tablespoons flour ½ can salmon
½ cup milk 2 eggs

Melt butter, stir in flour, add milk, and stir until smooth; add salt; rinse salmon with hot water; flake, and add to sauce; beat yolks of eggs until light and thick, and add to sauce; fold in whites of eggs beaten very stiff. Pour into a hot greased omelet pan, and cook slowly until well risen and firm; finish cooking on top grate of oven for a minute or two; fold, and serve on a hot platter.

224.—SCALLOPED EGGS WITH CHEESE

4 hard-cooked eggs ½ cup cheese cut fine
2 cups White Sauce (see No. 207) ½ cup Buttered Crumbs (see No. 472)

Cut eggs in eighths lengthwise; put half of them into a greased baking dish, cover with half of sauce, and sprinkle with half of cheese; repeat; cover with crumbs, and bake about fifteen minutes, or until crumbs are brown. Bacon or sausage fat may be used in making the white sauce.[Pg 93]

225.—SCRAMBLED EGGS WITH SAUSAGES

4 small sausages ¼ teaspoon salt
3 eggs 1/3 cup water

Cut sausages in half-inch bias pieces, and cook in a frying pan until brown; beat eggs until light, add salt and water, pour over sausages, and scramble until firm. Garnish with toast points and parsley.

226.—SCRAMBLED EGGS WITH TOMATO

½ can condensed tomato soup 4 eggs slightly beaten
1/8 teaspoon soda 6 slices buttered toast

Heat soup in an omelet pan; add soda, and stir while foaming; add eggs, scramble slowly with a fork until firm, and serve on toast. Garnish with toast points.

227.—SHIRRED EGGS

Grease individual egg shirrers or a platter which can be put in oven; cover bottom of dish with white sauce or left-over gravy, sprinkle with left-over vegetables or bits of meat chopped; carefully break an egg into dish for each person, dust with salt and pepper; sprinkle with buttered crumbs, and bake in a moderate oven until egg is set.

228.—SHIRRED EGGS WITH HAM

1 cup finely chopped cooked ham ½ cup Buttered Crumbs (see No. 472)
1 cup soft bread crumbs 4 eggs
½ cup milk Salt and pepper

Mix ham, soft crumbs, and milk, and spread in four buttered egg shirrers; make a hollow in the middle, break an egg into it, season lightly with salt and pepper, cover with buttered crumbs, and bake until egg is set.[Pg 94]

229.—SOUFFLÉED EGG WITH HAM TOAST

For each person cut a round of bread three inches in diameter; spread with finely chopped ham moistened with milk, stock, or gravy; add a few grains of salt to the white of an egg, and beat very stiff; mound on ham, make a depression in the center, put in the yolk, dust lightly with salt and pepper, and bake in a moderate oven until egg is firm. When several pieces of toast are to be made, keep the yolks in separate dishes until needed, but beat the whites together.

230.—SHIRRED EGGS WITH POTATO AND HAM

See recipe for Baked Ham and Potato (No. 171).[Pg 95]


CHAPTER XII

CHEESE AND NUTS

231.—CHEESE CROUSTADES

1½ cups cheese cut fine ¼ teaspoon paprika
¼ teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon Brand's A 1 sauce
¼ teaspoon mustard 3 tablespoons milk or cream

Mix in order given; fill Croustades (see No. 473), and put in a hot oven until cheese melts. Serve immediately, before cheese toughens.

232.—CHEESE CUSTARD

1 cup soft bread crumbs ¼ teaspoon salt
1 cup cheese cut fine 1/8 teaspoon soda
¼ teaspoon mustard 1 egg slightly beaten
½ teaspoon paprika 1 cup hot milk

Mix in order given, turn into a greased baking dish, and bake in a slow oven twenty-five minutes.

233.—CHEESE FONDUE

½ cup dried bread crumbs 1/3 teaspoon paprika
¾ cup boiling water 1 teaspoon mustard
1 tablespoon butter ½ cup milk
1 cup cheese cut fine Yolks of two eggs
1/3 teaspoon salt Whites of two eggs

Mix in the order given, beating the yolks until thick and light, and the whites until very stiff; pour into a greased baking dish, bake twenty-five minutes in a slow oven, and serve at once.[Pg 96]

234.—COTTAGE CHEESE

1 quart thick sour milk ½ tablespoon soft butter
1 quart boiling water 1/3 teaspoon salt

Put milk in a large bowl, add boiling water, and let stand five minutes; pour into cheesecloth bag, and drain over night or for several hours. Mix cheese with butter and salt, press into a small bowl, and chill. A sweet red pepper (canned) may be pressed through a sieve and mixed with cheese.

235.—CRACKERS AND CHEESE BAKED IN MILK

Split butter crackers, spread with butter and grated cheese, sprinkle with salt and pepper, put in a buttered baking dish, cover with milk, and bake about twenty minutes in a moderate oven.

236.—CHEESE PASTE

½ pound American cheese 2 teaspoons Worcestershire sauce
1 cake cream cheese ¼ teaspoon salt
2 pimientos ¼ cup cream

Chop American cheese and pimientos, using the finest cutter in the food chopper; add cream cheese and seasonings, and blend with cream until smooth.

237.—BAKED RICE WITH CHEESE

2 cups cooked rice 1/8 teaspoon pepper
¾ cup grated cheese ¾ cup hot milk
1/3 teaspoon salt

Arrange rice and cheese in layers in a greased baking dish; sprinkle with salt and pepper, cover with milk, and bake in a moderate oven about fifteen minutes.[Pg 97]

238.—SCALLOPED TOAST AND CHEESE

4 slices of toast 1 egg beaten
1 cup cheese cut fine ¼ teaspoon salt
1½ cups milk ¼ teaspoon mustard

Butter toast, cut each slice into four pieces, and arrange in a baking dish in layers sprinkled with cheese; mix milk, egg, and seasonings, pour over toast, and let stand fifteen minutes. Bake in a moderate oven about twenty minutes.

239.—TOMATO RAREBIT

1 can condensed tomato soup ½ pound cheese cut fine
½ cup soft bread crumbs ¼ teaspoon mustard

Heat soup, add bread crumbs, cheese, and mustard; stir until cheese melts, and serve on toast or crackers.

240.—WELSH RAREBIT

1 tablespoon butter ¼ teaspoon paprika
1 tablespoon flour ¼ teaspoon salt
1 cup hot milk 1/8 teaspoon soda
½ pound cheese cut fine Dash of cayenne
½ teaspoon mustard 1 beaten egg

Melt butter, add flour, and when well mixed add milk, and stir until smooth; add cheese and seasonings, and cook until cheese is melted; add egg, cook two or three minutes, and serve on hot toast or crisp pilot crackers. The egg may be omitted.

241.—SALTED ALMONDS

1 cup almonds (shelled) 1 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon butter

Cover almonds with boiling water and let stand on back of range for ten minutes; slip off the skins, and dry for[Pg 98] several hours, or over night; melt butter, add almonds and salt, and mix well; spread in a dripping pan, and bake in a slow oven fifteen or twenty minutes, stirring occasionally. When prepared in this way nuts will keep crisp.

242.—PEANUT BUTTER

2 quarts lightly roasted peanuts Cream or melted butter
1 teaspoon salt

Remove shells and skins of peanuts, and put through the food chopper twice, using first a coarse cutter, and then the finest cutter; add salt, and enough cream or melted butter to make a smooth paste.

243.—TO SHELL CHESTNUTS

Cover with boiling water, boil ten minutes, drain, and cover with cold water. Remove the shell with a knife, beginning at top of nut. The inner skin will come off with the shell.

244.—BAKED CHESTNUTS

1 pint chestnuts 1 tablespoon butter
1½ cups hot ham stock 1/8 teaspoon pepper

Shell chestnuts, put in baking dish with stock, butter, and pepper; cover, and bake in hot oven about half an hour, or until soft; remove cover, and brown. If stock is very salt, dilute with water or milk.

245—CELERY, NUT, AND POTATO LOAF

2 cups celery cut in half-inch pieces 1 egg slightly beaten
½ cup chopped nut meats 1 teaspoon salt
2 cups hot mashed potato ½ teaspoon paprika
2 tablespoons butter 1 teaspoon grated onion

Cook celery in boiling salted water about half an hour, or until tender, and drain; add other ingredients in order[Pg 99] given; mix well; pack in deep greased pan, and bake in a moderate oven about half an hour. Turn out on platter, and serve with Creole Sauce (see No. 191) or Tomato Sauce (see No. 203).

246.—NUT LOAF

2 cups soft stale bread crumbs ¼ teaspoon paprika
1 cup nut meats finely chopped 1 egg slightly beaten
1 teaspoon salt 3 tablespoons sausage fat or butter
½ teaspoon poultry seasoning ½ cup boiling water

Mix in order given; pack in a deep greased pan, and bake in a moderate oven half an hour. Turn out on platter, and serve with Cheese Sauce (see No. 188).[Pg 100]


CHAPTER XIII

VEGETABLES[8]

247.—BOSTON BAKED BEANS

1 quart pea beans ¼ teaspoon soda
1 tablespoon salt ¼ cup molasses
1 teaspoon dry mustard ½ pound fat salt pork

Soak beans in cold water over night; drain, cover with cold water, heat to boiling point, and simmer until beans are very tender but not broken; place in an earthen bean pot, add seasonings and pork (which has been scalded, scraped, and scored in half-inch squares); fill pot with boiling water, cover, and bake slowly for eight hours. Uncover for the last hour. Replenish water as needed.

248.—THICK PURÉE OF BLACK BEANS

2 cups beans ½ teaspoon salt
1 onion 1/8 teaspoon pepper
1 carrot 3 tablespoons bacon fat
½ bay leaf 1 quart boiling water
¼ teaspoon mustard

Soak beans over night in cold water; drain, add seasonings, bacon fat, and water, and simmer two hours; remove onion, carrot, and bay leaf, and press through a sieve. Beat well, and serve with lamb or mutton.[Pg 101]

249.—LIMA BEAN LOAF

1 cup dried Lima beans ½ teaspoon paprika
1 onion 1 egg slightly beaten
1 carrot 2 tablespoons sausage fat or butter
1 cup dried sifted crumbs ½ cup boiling water
1 teaspoon salt 6 pimolas
4 teaspoon mustard

Soak beans over night in cold water, and drain; cover with boiling water, add onion and carrot, and cook until beans are tender; drain, and put through the food chopper with carrot and onion; add crumbs, seasonings, egg, and sausage fat melted in boiling water; add pimolas cut in small pieces, mix well, pack in a greased bread pan, and bake in a moderate oven half an hour. Serve with Tomato Sauce (see No. 203).

250.—BAKED CABBAGE

Cut a small white cabbage in inch pieces, soak in cold water half an hour, and drain; parboil ten minutes, place in greased baking dish, cover with one cup of White Sauce (see No. 207), and one-half cup of Buttered Crumbs (see No. 472); bake in a moderate oven half an hour.

251.—CABBAGE COOKED IN MILK

Put a small white cabbage through the food chopper, using the coarse cutter; soak in cold water half an hour, drain, cover with equal parts of milk and water, and cook uncovered about twenty-five minutes, or until cabbage is tender. Season with salt and pepper.[Pg 102]

252.—BRAISED CELERY

1 quart celery cut in 2-inch lengths 2 tablespoons flour
2 tablespoons bacon fat 2 cups stock
1 tablespoon grated onion

Cook celery, bacon fat, and onion in the frying pan for ten minutes; dredge with flour, put in baking dish, add stock (first rinsing frying pan with a little of it), cover, and bake in a moderate oven an hour and a half. Serve on toast. Add salt to stock if necessary.

253.—CREAMED CELERY ROOT (Celeriac) WITH CHEESE

Peel celery root, cut in half-inch cubes, and cook until tender in boiling salted water, to which a tablespoon of vinegar has been added. To three cups of root add one and one-half cups of White Sauce (see No. 207); put into a baking dish, sprinkle with a third of a cup of grated cheese, and place in a hot oven until cheese melts. Celery may be used in place of celery root.

254.—SOUTHERN CORN PUDDING

1 tablespoon bacon fat 1 egg well beaten
½ green pepper chopped 1 cup milk
1 slice onion chopped ½ teaspoon salt
1 can corn chopped ¼ teaspoon paprika
2 tablespoons dried bread crumbs 2 slices bacon chopped fine

Cook pepper and onion in bacon fat five minutes; add corn, crumbs, egg, milk, and seasonings; pour into a greased baking dish, sprinkle with the chopped bacon, and bake in a slow oven until firm, or about twenty-five minutes.[Pg 103]

255.—CUCUMBERS SAUTÉED

Peel two cucumbers, cut in halves crosswise, slice in one-third-inch slices lengthwise, and soak in salted water for one hour; drain, dry, dip in flour seasoned with salt and pepper, and sauté in hot fat until brown. Serve on toast.

256.—CARROTS SAUTÉED

Select very small carrots; wash, scrape, and cook until tender in boiling salted water. Drain, dredge with flour, and sauté in fat until brown.

257.—CARROTS VINAIGRETTE

4 cups carrots cut in half-inch cubes ¾ cup brown sugar
½ cup vinegar 1 tablespoon shortening

Cook carrots in boiling salted water until tender, and drain; heat vinegar, sugar, and shortening to the boiling point, add carrots, and cook slowly half an hour, stirring occasionally.

258.—BAKED EGG PLANT

1 small egg plant ¼ teaspoon paprika
1 onion finely chopped ½ cup boiling water
1 cup soft stale bread crumbs 2 tablespoons butter
1 teaspoon salt

Pare and slice egg plant, cut into half-inch cubes, soak in cold salted water half an hour, and drain; mix with onion, crumbs, and seasonings, and put into a greased baking dish; add boiling water, dot over with butter, and bake one hour in a moderate oven.

259.—FRIED EGG PLANT

Cut a small egg plant in one-third-inch slices; pare; cut each slice in quarters; soak in cold salted water for[Pg 104] half an hour; drain; season with pepper and salt, dip in crumbs, then in egg, and then in crumbs again; and fry in deep fat about three minutes. Or dip in flour and sauté in butter.

260.—EGG PLANT JULIENNE

Cut egg plant in two-inch slices, and pare; cut into quarter-inch vertical slices, and cut slices into quarter-inch strips; soak in cold salted water for half an hour; drain; dry, and fry in deep fat about three minutes.

261.—CREAMED LEEKS

Cut off tops of two bunches of leeks, and soak in cold water ten minutes; drain, and cook in boiling salted water about twenty minutes, or until tender; drain, and serve with White Sauce (see No. 207). The tops may be used for flavoring soups.

262.—ONIONS IN POTATO NESTS

1 quart small white onions 1/8 teaspoon pepper
1 tablespoon butter 1 tablespoon butter
6 potatoes ¼ cup hot milk
1/3 teaspoon salt 1 tablespoon chopped parsley

Peel onions and cook in boiling salted water about one hour, or until tender; drain, and add butter. Pare, boil, and mash potatoes, season with pepper and salt, add butter and hot milk, and beat until light; shape potato into small nests with a spoon, or force through a bag and a rose tube. Fill with onions and sprinkle with parsley.

263.—GREEN PEAS (Canned)

Remove from can and rinse with cold water; put in saucepan, cover with cold water, bring to boiling point,[Pg 105] and drain. Season with one-half teaspoon salt, one-fourth teaspoon pepper, one tablespoon butter, and two tablespoons of milk.

264.—PEAS AND LETTUCE

1 head lettuce 1 tablespoon butter
½ cup stock or water 1 tablespoon flour
¾ teaspoon salt 1 can peas
1/8 teaspoon pepper 1 sprig mint
1 teaspoon sugar

Wash lettuce, drain, and chop; add stock and salt, and simmer half an hour; add pepper and sugar, and thicken with butter and flour blended together; add peas drained from their liquor, and mint, and simmer ten minutes. Remove mint before serving.

265.—STUFFED GREEN PEPPERS

6 green peppers ½ cup tomatoes
2 tablespoons bacon fat ½ teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon grated onion ¼ cup buttered crumbs
1 cup cooked rice

Cut off one inch of the tops of peppers, and chop the tops; remove seeds and veins from peppers, scald with boiling water, and drain; cook chopped pepper with onion in the bacon fat for five minutes; add rice, tomatoes, and salt; fill peppers, cover with crumbs, place in a baking dish or in individual ramekins, and bake in a moderate oven half an hour.

266.—BOILED POTATOES

Wash potatoes, pare as thin as possible, remove the eyes, and soak in cold water from fifteen minutes to one hour, according to the age of the potato; cook in boiling[Pg 106] salted water about half an hour, or until tender, allowing one tablespoon of salt to two quarts of boiling water. Drain, and dry on the back of the range or in the front of the oven with the door open. Serve very hot in an uncovered dish.

267.—BAKED POTATOES

Select medium-sized potatoes, scrub well, place in tin pan, and bake in a hot oven for about forty minutes.

268.—CREAMED POTATOES

2 cups raw potato balls or half-inch cubes 1 cup White Sauce (see No. 207)
1 slice onion 1 teaspoon finely chopped parsley

Cook potatoes with the onion in boiling salted water until tender; drain; remove the onion, mix with sauce, and sprinkle with parsley. If potato balls are used, cover unused potato with water and save for soup.

269.—POTATO CROUTONS

Cut potatoes in one-third-inch cubes, rinse with cold water, dry in a towel, and fry about two minutes in deep fat.

270.—FRENCH FRIED POTATOES

Wash and pare medium-sized potatoes, cut in eighths lengthwise, and soak in cold water for half an hour; drain, dry, and fry in deep fat about seven minutes; drain on soft paper, and sprinkle with salt. Cook only one layer in the basket at a time.

271.—HASHED BROWN POTATOES

Melt in the frying pan four tablespoons sausage fat, beef drippings, or other fat; add two cups chopped boiled[Pg 107] potatoes, season, and cook slowly twenty minutes, or until well browned; fold double, and garnish with parsley.

272.—LYONNAISE POTATOES

4 boiled potatoes 2 tablespoons sausage fat
½ teaspoon salt 2 slices onion finely chopped
1/8 teaspoon pepper

Cut potatoes in half-inch cubes, and season with salt and pepper; put fat in frying pan, add onion, and cook slowly for ten minutes; add potatoes, stir well, and cook for ten minutes without browning.

273.—PAN-ROASTED POTATOES (Franconia)

Prepare potatoes as for boiling (see No. 266), boil ten minutes, drain, and cook in roasting pan with meat about forty minutes; baste often with fat in pan.

274.—SCALLOPED POTATOES WITH CHEESE

Wash and pare four potatoes, cut in very thin slices, put half of them in a greased baking dish; dredge with flour, sprinkle with salt, pepper, and two tablespoons grated cheese; repeat; cover with hot milk, and bake in a moderate oven one hour, or until potatoes are tender. Very old potatoes should not be used in this way.

275.—SCALLOPED POTATOES WITH PEPPERS AND CHEESE

1 quart half-inch potato cubes ½ teaspoon salt
1 onion chopped ½ teaspoon paprika
2 tablespoons bacon fat 2 canned red peppers
4 tablespoons flour ½ cup grated cheese
2 cups hot milk ½ cup buttered crumbs

Cook potatoes and onion in boiling salted water twenty minutes, and drain; melt bacon fat, add flour, and blend[Pg 108] well; add milk and stir until smooth; add salt, paprika, peppers chopped, and cheese; mix with potatoes; turn into a greased baking dish, cover with Buttered Crumbs (see No. 472), and bake fifteen minutes, or until brown.

276.—STUFFED POTATOES WITH CHEESE AND BACON

4 large potatoes ¼ teaspoon paprika
4 tablespoons grated cheese ¼ cup hot milk
¾ teaspoon salt 4 slices bacon

Wash potatoes and bake in a hot oven forty-five minutes; cut in halves lengthwise, remove potato, and force through potato ricer; add cheese, seasonings, and hot milk, beat vigorously, and refill potato skins; place half a slice of bacon on top of each, and put on the upper grate of a hot oven until bacon is crisp.

277.—STUFFED POTATOES WITH NUTS AND CHEESE

4 hot baked potatoes ½ tablespoon butter
¼ cup nuts chopped fine ½ teaspoon salt
¼ cup grated cheese ¼ teaspoon pepper
¼ cup milk Butter and paprika

Cut potatoes in halves, lengthwise, remove potato, and mash; add nuts, cheese, milk, butter, and seasonings, and beat until very light; refill shells, heaping mixture in the center, make a slight depression with spoon, put in a small bit of butter, sprinkle with paprika, and brown in a hot oven.

278.—FRENCH FRIED SWEET POTATOES

Cut cold boiled sweet potatoes into eighths lengthwise, fry in deep fat until brown, drain on soft paper, and sprinkle with salt.[Pg 109]

279.—GLAZED SWEET POTATOES

Cut cooked sweet potatoes in one-third-inch slices lengthwise, put in a greased dripping pan, brush with melted butter or drippings, sprinkle thickly with brown sugar, and bake in a hot oven until glazed with melted sugar.

280.—SWEET POTATO CUSTARD

3 cooked sweet potatoes ¼ nutmeg grated
2 eggs ¼ cup brown sugar
1/3 teaspoon salt 1 quart milk

Force potatoes through a ricer; beat the eggs and milk with potato; add other ingredients, pour into buttered baking dish or cups, and bake in a slow oven until firm.

281.—STUFFED SWEET POTATOES

3 medium-sized baked sweet potatoes 1 tablespoon butter
½ teaspoon salt ¼ cup milk
1/8 teaspoon pepper Powdered sugar

Cut baked potatoes in halves lengthwise; mash potatoes, add salt, pepper, butter, and milk, and beat well; fill potato shells lightly, sprinkle thickly with sugar, and bake in a hot oven until brown. Sliced marshmallows may be used instead of sugar.

282.—CREAMED SALSIFY (Oyster Plant)

Cut off the tops of a bunch of salsify; scrape, cut in quarter-inch slices, and keep white by putting in cold water with a tablespoon of vinegar in it until ready to cook; drain; cook in boiling salted water about twenty-five minutes, or until tender; drain, and mix with one cup of White Sauce (see No. 207).[Pg 110]

283.—SPINACH

Pick over spinach, and wash well in several waters; put in kettle without water, cover, and cook about half an hour, or until tender; chop fine and season with salt, pepper, and butter. A thin slice of fat salt pork or a tablespoon of bacon fat may be cooked with spinach if preferred. In that case, omit butter. Or cook in ham or corned beef stock, drain, and season only with pepper. Garnish with thin slices of hard-cooked egg, or sprinkle with the yolk of egg pressed through a sieve.

284.—BAKED WINTER SQUASH

Cut half a small squash into four pieces, scrape out seeds and stringy part, put in a pan, shell side up, and bake in a hot oven about forty minutes. Remove from shell with a spoon, press through a sieve, season with salt, pepper, and butter, and serve. Or put in a greased baking dish, cover with Buttered Crumbs (see No. 472), and bake until crumbs are brown.

285.—PLYMOUTH SUCCOTASH

½ cup dried Lima beans 1/8 teaspoon pepper
Corned beef stock ¾ cup corned beef cut in small pieces
½ can corn

Soak beans over night, drain, cover with cold water, and cook one hour; drain, cover with stock, and cook until tender; add corn, pepper, and meat, and simmer ten minutes. Add salt if necessary. Any stock or left-over bits of meat may be used.[Pg 111]

286.—BAKED TOMATOES

Cut four tomatoes in halves crosswise, sprinkle with salt and pepper, and cover with buttered crumbs; bake in a hot oven about twenty minutes, and serve with Mustard Pickle Sauce (see No. 200) or cooked salad dressing.

287.—TOMATO CUSTARD

1 can tomatoes 4 cloves
1 cup water ½ bay leaf
1¼ teaspoons salt 2 tablespoons sugar
¼ teaspoon pepper ¼ cup cracker dust
2 slices onion 2 eggs

Simmer tomatoes, water, and seasonings for fifteen minutes, and press through a sieve; add crumbs and slightly beaten eggs, and bake in greased custard cups about twenty minutes, or until firm; turn out on platter and pour Cheese Sauce (see No. 188) around them.

288.—FRIED GREEN TOMATOES

Wipe tomatoes, cut in thick slices, season with salt and pepper, dip first in flour, then in egg, then in crumbs, and fry in deep fat until brown. Or season, dip in flour only, and sauté in butter.

289.—STEWED TOMATOES

1 can tomatoes, or 6 ripe tomatoes ¼ teaspoon soda
1 teaspoon salt 1 tablespoon butter
1 teaspoon sugar ½ cup bread crust crumbs
¼ teaspoon pepper

Put tomatoes in a stew pan; if fresh tomatoes are used, scald, peel, and cut in pieces. Add seasonings, except pepper, and cook slowly for thirty minutes; add butter and crumbs just before serving.[Pg 112]

290.—STUFFED TOMATOES

Select six medium-sized tomatoes; cut a thin slice from the top of each, and remove the pulp; rub slices through a sieve, and add to pulp; add one cup soft stale bread crumbs, one teaspoon salt, one teaspoon Worcestershire sauce, and one tablespoon tomato ketchup; mix well, fill tomatoes, cover with Buttered Crumbs (see No. 472), and bake in a moderate oven half an hour.

291.—CREAMED WHITE TURNIPS

Cook two cups of half-inch cubes of white turnip in boiling salted water half an hour, or until tender; drain, and mix with one cup of White Sauce (see No. 207).

292.—VEGETABLE HASH

2 cups cooked cabbage 1/8 teaspoon pepper
1 cup cooked potatoes 1 teaspoon salt
1 cup cooked turnips 2 tablespoons beef drippings
1 cup cooked beets 1/3 cup stock or water
1 tablespoon grated onion

Mix vegetables and seasonings; melt fat in frying pan, add vegetables and stock; cook slowly half an hour. Fold, and serve on a hot dish. If vegetables are left from a boiled dinner, omit salt.

[Pg 113]


CHAPTER XIV

CEREALS, MACARONI, AND RICE

293.—CORN MEAL MUSH

3½ cups boiling water 1 cup fine corn meal
1 teaspoon salt

Add meal to boiling salted water by sifting it slowly through the fingers, while stirring rapidly with the other hand. Boil for ten minutes, and cook over hot water for two hours. Serve hot as a cereal. Or pour into one-pound baking powder boxes to cool; slice, dip in flour, and sauté in butter; or dip in egg and crumbs, and fry in deep fat. Serve either for breakfast, or as an accompaniment to roast pork, or, with sirup, for dessert.

294.—STEAMED HOMINY

4 cups boiling water 1 cup fine hominy
1 teaspoon salt

Put salt and boiling water in top of double boiler, place in direct contact with range, sift in hominy slowly, and boil for ten minutes, stirring often; cover, and cook over hot water two hours.

295.—SCALLOPED MACARONI AND CHEESE

1½ cups elbow macaroni ½ cup cheese cut fine
1 onion ¼ teaspoon mustard
1 cup White Sauce (see No. 207) 1/3 cup Buttered Crumbs (see No. 472)

Cook macaroni and onion in boiling salted water until tender, and drain; remove onion, add cheese and mustard[Pg 114] to sauce and mix with macaroni; turn into a greased baking dish, cover with crumbs, and bake in a moderate oven until crumbs are brown.

296.—NOODLE PASTE

1 egg ¼ teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon water Bread flour

Beat egg slightly, add water, salt, and flour enough to make a very stiff dough; knead well for three minutes, adding flour if necessary. Roll out as thin as possible; cut in fancy shapes with small vegetable cutter; or roll like a jelly roll and cut thin slices from the end. Cook in soup, or in boiling salted water. If served as a vegetable, season with butter, salt, and pepper, or serve with White Sauce (see No. 207).

297.—NOODLE BALLS (for Soup)

Roll Noodle Paste (see No. 296) very thin, fold double, and cut with small round vegetable cutter, or end of pastry tube; fry in deep fat until puffed into balls. Drain on soft paper.

298.—SCOTCH OATMEAL

4 cups boiling water 1 cup oatmeal
1 teaspoon salt

Put water and salt in top of double boiler, place in direct contact with range, sift in oatmeal slowly, and boil for five minutes, stirring often; cover, and cook over hot water four hours, or cook on back of range over night.[Pg 115]

299.—POLENTA WITH CHEESE

2 cups boiling water 1 cup corn meal
2 cups milk 1 cup cheese grated, or soft cheese cut fine
1 teaspoon salt

Heat water and milk to the boiling point, add salt, and sift in corn meal very slowly. Cook over hot water two hours, or put into a fireless cooker for three hours. When cooked, add cheese, pour into a shallow pan until half an inch thick. When cold, cut into two-inch squares, dip in crumbs, then in egg, and then again in crumbs, and fry in deep fat. Or roll in flour and sauté in butter. Mustard, cayenne, Worcestershire sauce, etc., may be added if desired.

300.—POLENTA WITH DATES

Prepare recipe for Polenta with Cheese (see No. 299), using in place of the cheese one and a half cups of dates, which have been washed, stoned, and cut in pieces. Serve hot as a cereal or dessert, or in any way in which mush is served. Cooked dried peaches, apricots, prunes, or figs may be substituted for dates.

301.—FRENCH FRIED POLENTA

Prepare recipe for Polenta with Cheese (see No. 299); pour into a shallow pan until two-thirds of an inch thick; cool; cut into strips about three inches long; dip first in crumbs, then in egg, and then again in crumbs; and fry in deep fat.[Pg 116]

302.—SPANISH POLENTA

4 cups boiling water 1 green pepper
1 teaspoon salt 1 cup corn meal
1 onion 1 cup cheese cut fine

Add salt to boiling water; add onion and pepper chopped fine; sift in corn meal very slowly, stirring all the time. Cook over hot water for two hours; add cheese, and serve hot with Tomato Sauce (see No. 203).

303.—BAKED RICE AND HAM

½ cup rice ½ cup cooked ham finely chopped
2½ cups stock or water 1 tablespoon onion finely chopped
2 cups milk 2 tablespoons carrot finely chopped

Wash rice, place in greased baking dish; add liquid, ham, vegetables, and salt if necessary. Bake slowly for three hours, stirring occasionally during the first hour. Ham stock or corned beef stock may be used, and any cooked meat substituted for ham. Serve with boiled spinach or dressed lettuce.

304.—BOILED RICE

Wash one cup rice, and add slowly to two quarts of boiling salted water, allowing one tablespoon of salt; cook until tender, pour into strainer, rinse with boiling water, and put in oven or on back of range for a few minutes, until the grains separate. Very old rice is improved by soaking in cold water for an hour or two before cooking. Corned beef or ham stock may be used in place of salted water.[Pg 117]

305.—RICE AND COCONUT LOAF

2 cups cooked rice ¼ teaspoon paprika
1 cup stewed and strained tomatoes ¼ teaspoon mustard
1 tablespoon grated onion 1 can grated coconut
2 teaspoons salt 2 tablespoons melted bacon fat
1 egg slightly beaten

Mix all ingredients except the bacon fat; put into a deep greased pan, cover with bacon fat, and bake in a slow oven one hour.

306.—RISOTTO

½ cup rice 1 onion chopped
1 cup boiling water 1 green pepper chopped
1 teaspoon salt ½ can tomatoes
3 tablespoons bacon fat ¼ teaspoon paprika

Cook rice with boiling water and salt in top of double boiler twelve minutes, cook onion and pepper in bacon fat ten minutes, stirring often; add tomatoes and paprika, mix with rice, and cook forty-five minutes.

307.—STEAMED SAMP

½ cup samp ¾ teaspoon salt
2½ cups boiling water

Wash samp, soak over night in cold water, and drain; put boiling water and salt in top of double boiler, and place directly on the range; add samp slowly, and boil five minutes; place over hot water and cook for four hours.

308.—CORN MEAL AND BEEF SCRAPPLE

3½ cups corned beef stock 1 cup corned beef cut in small pieces
1 cup corn meal

Cook meal in stock as directed in Corn Meal Mush (see No. 293), add meat, and pour into a deep bread[Pg 118] pan; when cold, either slice and serve cold, or dip in flour and sauté in butter, or dip in crumbs, then in egg, and then again in crumbs, and fry in deep fat. If stock is very salt, dilute with water or milk. Any kind of stock or meat may be used in place of corned beef.

309.—WHEAT AND SAUSAGE SCRAPPLE

3¾ cups boiling water 1 cup Cream of Wheat
1 teaspoon salt ½ pound link sausage

Stir wheat slowly into boiling salted water, cook five minutes, place over hot water, and cook half an hour. Cook sausages in frying pan until brown, cut into half-inch pieces, add to mush, and pour into deep pan to cool. Serve sliced cold, sautéed, or fried.

310.—BAKED SPAGHETTI AND HAM

2 cups cooked spaghetti 1½ cups White Sauce (see No. 207)
¾ cup cooked ham finely chopped 2 tablespoons tomato ketchup
1 hard-cooked egg chopped ½ cup Buttered Crumbs (see No. 472)

Put half of spaghetti into a greased baking dish; mix ham and egg, and add half of it to spaghetti; mix sauce and ketchup, and pour half of it over ham; repeat; cover with crumbs, and bake in a hot oven about fifteen minutes.

311.—CREOLE SPAGHETTI

2 cups spaghetti broken in 2-inch pieces 1 cup tomatoes
1 onion chopped fine ½ teaspoon salt
1 green pepper chopped fine ½ teaspoon paprika
3 tablespoons bacon fat

Cook spaghetti in boiling salted water until tender, and drain; cook onion and pepper in bacon fat for ten minutes,[Pg 119] stirring often; add tomatoes and seasonings, put in top of double boiler, add spaghetti, and cook half an hour. Macaroni may be used in place of spaghetti.

312.—ITALIAN SPAGHETTI

2 cups spaghetti broken in 2-inch pieces ½ bay leaf
½ onion 1 can condensed tomato soup
4 cloves ¼ cup grated cheese

Cook spaghetti in boiling salted water with the onion, cloves, and bay leaf until tender; drain, remove onion, cloves, and bay leaf; add soup and cheese, and heat to boiling point. One-half can tomatoes seasoned, stewed until thick, and pressed through a sieve, may be used in place of soup. Macaroni may be used in place of spaghetti.[Pg 120]


CHAPTER XV

CROQUETTES AND FRITTERS[9]

313.—TO CLARIFY FAT

Melt fat, add one pared and sliced raw potato, a pinch of soda, and a tablespoon of water; heat slowly, and cook until fat stops bubbling; strain through double cheesecloth.

314.—TO TRY OUT FAT

Cut any surplus fat into pieces, put into double boiler, cover, cook slowly until fat is extracted, and strain through double cheesecloth.

315.—CRUMBS FOR FRIED FOOD

Dry left-over bits of bread in a slow oven, put through food chopper, using finest cutter, and sift through a coarse sieve. Keep in covered jars.

316.—EGG FOR DIPPING FRIED FOOD

Break egg into a soup plate or similar shallow dish, beat enough to mix yolk and white, and add one-fourth cup of cold water or one-third cup of milk. Coat food thoroughly to prevent soaking fat.

317.—CHEESE BALLS

1½ cups cheese cut fine ¼ teaspoon mustard
1 tablespoon flour ¼ teaspoon paprika
¼ teaspoon salt Whites of 2 eggs beaten stiff

Mix in order given, shape in balls about one inch in diameter, roll in sifted crumbs, and fry in deep fat until[Pg 121] brown. Drain on soft paper, and serve hot. Serve with the salad course or as a savory.

318.—CHEESE CROQUETTES

3 tablespoons shortening ¼ teaspoon paprika
1/3 cup bread flour ¼ teaspoon mustard
1 cup hot milk Few grains cayenne
¼ teaspoon salt 1 cup cheese cut fine

Melt shortening, add flour; add hot milk, and stir until smooth and thick; add seasonings and cheese, and pour into a shallow dish to cool. Shape into small pyramids, roll in sifted crumbs, dip in egg, and again in crumbs, and fry in deep fat until brown. Serve immediately.

319.—FISH CROQUETTES

2 cups cold flaked fish Salt and cayenne
1 tablespoon lemon juice 1 cup Croquette Sauce (see No. 192)
Few drops onion juice

Use remnants of baked or boiled fish, sprinkle with lemon and onion juice, dust lightly with salt and cayenne, and mix with sauce. When cold, shape into small croquettes or cutlets, dip in crumbs, egg, and again in crumbs, and fry in hot deep fat one minute.

320.—MEAT CROQUETTES

To two cups of cooked meat cut in small pieces add one teaspoon of Worcestershire sauce and a few drops of onion juice; mix with one cup of Croquette Sauce (see No. 192) and put on ice until cold. Shape into small croquettes or cutlets, roll in crumbs, dip in egg, and again in crumbs, and fry in hot deep fat. Any left-over meat may be used.[Pg 122]

321.—POTATO AND BEAN CROQUETTES

2 cups cold baked beans 1 tablespoon Worcestershire or Brand's A 1 sauce
1 cup mashed potato Salt if needed
¼ teaspoon paprika

Press beans through a sieve, add potato and seasonings, mix well, and shape into small pyramids. Roll in crumbs, dip in egg, roll in crumbs again, and fry in hot deep fat. Drain on soft paper, and serve with Tomato Sauce (see No. 203).

322.—RICE CROQUETTES

1 egg slightly beaten 1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
¼ teaspoon salt 2 tablespoons cold water
¼ teaspoon onion juice 2 cups cooked rice
1 tablespoon tomato ketchup

Mix in order given; shape into small pyramids, dip in crumbs, egg, and again in crumbs, and fry in hot deep fat.

323.—RICE AND RAISIN CROQUETTES

½ cup rice 1 cup hot milk
1 cup boiling water 1 tablespoon butter
1 teaspoon salt 2 tablespoons sultana raisins

Wash rice, stir into boiling salted water, and boil five minutes, add milk, butter, and raisins, and cook over hot water about twenty-five minutes, or until rice is tender. Shape into small pyramids, dip in egg and crumbs, and fry in hot deep fat. Serve with Currant Jelly Sauce (see No. 608) or Lemon Sauce (see No. 613).

324.—SALMON AND POTATO CROQUETTES

Rinse a can of salmon with boiling water, and separate into flakes; mix with two cups of hot, well-seasoned[Pg 123] mashed potatoes, and a tablespoon of finely chopped mixed pickles. Shape into small croquettes, dip in crumbs, egg, and then in crumbs again, and fry in hot deep fat one minute.

325.—SLICED APPLE FRITTERS

1 cup flour 1 egg well beaten
¼ teaspoon salt ½ cup cold water
1 tablespoon sugar 3 tart apples

Mix and sift flour, salt, and sugar; add egg and water, and beat well; pare, core, and cut apples into half-inch slices; dip in batter until well coated, and fry in hot deep fat; drain on soft paper, and dust with powdered sugar. Serve with roast pork or sausage, or serve with a liquid sauce as an entrée or a dessert.

326.—BANANA FRITTERS

1 cup flour 1 egg well beaten
1½ teaspoons baking powder ¼ cup cold water
¼ teaspoon salt 2 bananas
1 tablespoon powdered sugar

Mix and sift dry ingredients, add egg and water, and beat well; press bananas through a sieve, add to batter, and drop from a tablespoon into hot deep fat; drain on soft paper, dust with powdered sugar, and serve with Currant Jelly Sauce (see No. 608), or Lemon Sauce (see No. 613), either as an entrée or as a dessert.

327.—CORN FRITTERS

1 can corn 1 teaspoon salt
½ cup dried and sifted crumbs 1 teaspoon baking powder
1 egg well beaten 1 tablespoon flour
½ cup milk

Chop the corn, and add other ingredients in order given. Drop from a tablespoon into hot deep fat and fry until brown. Or sauté in a hot greased frying pan.[Pg 124]

328.—CRANBERRY FRITTERS

1 egg well beaten 1 cup flour
¼ teaspoon salt 1½ teaspoons baking powder
2 tablespoons sugar ½ cup chopped cranberries
¼ cup water

Mix in order given; drop from a tablespoon into hot deep fat, cook about three minutes, drain on soft paper, and dredge with powdered sugar.

329.—RICE AND CURRANT FRITTERS

1 cup flour 1 egg well beaten
1½ teaspoons baking powder 1/3 cup cold water
1/3 teaspoon salt 1 cup cooked rice
2 tablespoons sugar 2 tablespoons washed currants
¼ teaspoon nutmeg

Mix and sift dry ingredients; add egg and water, and beat well; add rice and currants, and drop from a tablespoon into hot deep fat; drain on soft paper, and serve with Currant Jelly Sauce (see No. 608), Orange Marmalade Sauce (see No. 616), or Lemon Sauce (see No. 613).

330.—SALMON FRITTERS

1-1/3 cups flour 2/3 cup water
¼ teaspoon salt ¼ teaspoon paprika
2 teaspoons baking powder ¼ teaspoon onion juice
1 egg well beaten ½ can salmon chopped fine

Sift flour, salt, and baking powder; add egg, water, and seasonings, and beat well; add salmon, and drop from a tablespoon into hot deep fat; cook until brown, drain on soft paper, and serve with Sauce Tartare (see No. 202) or Tomato Sauce (see No. 203).[Pg 125]

331.—DOUGHNUTS

2 cups flour ½ cup sugar
2½ teaspoons baking powder 1 egg well beaten
¾ teaspoon salt ½ cup milk
½ teaspoon nutmeg 1 tablespoon melted shortening

Mix and sift dry ingredients; add egg, milk, and shortening, and mix well; chill, and roll out on a floured board until half an inch thick; cut, and fry in hot deep fat. A little more flour may be necessary, but the dough should be as soft as can be handled easily.

332.—SMALL TEA DOUGHNUTS

Follow recipe for Doughnuts (see No. 331), roll mixture very thin, cut with a two-inch doughnut cutter, fry, and dust with powdered sugar. Or fry the cut-out centers of large doughnuts, and roll in powdered sugar.

333.—FRIED JAM CAKES

Roll doughnut mixture very thin, and cut with a three-inch cookie cutter; put a teaspoon of jam on one half, moisten the edges with water, fold double, press edges firmly together, and fry in hot deep fat. Dust with powdered sugar.

[Pg 126]


CHAPTER XVI

SALADS AND SALAD DRESSINGS

334.—COOKED SALAD DRESSING

1½ cups hot milk 2 tablespoons sugar
2 beaten eggs 2 teaspoons mustard
1 tablespoon salt Dash of cayenne
3 tablespoons flour ½ cup hot vinegar

Mix dry ingredients, add to egg, and stir into the hot milk; add vinegar slowly, and cook over hot water for ten minutes, stirring constantly at first. Cool, put into a preserve jar, cover, and keep in a cool place. Whipped cream may be added, if desired, before using. Allow one cup for the whole recipe. Two tablespoons of melted butter or salad oil may be added, but recipe is very good without either.

335.—COOKED SALAD DRESSING (Evaporated Milk)

½ teaspoon salt 1 beaten egg
1 teaspoon mustard 1 tablespoon melted butter
1½ teaspoons sugar 1/3 cup evaporated milk
1½ teaspoons flour 2/3 cup hot water
Few grains cayenne ¼ cup vinegar

Mix in order given, and cook over hot water for ten minutes, stirring constantly at first.[Pg 127]

336.—CURRANT JELLY DRESSING

¼ cup currant or any other tart jelly Juice of ½ lemon
2 tablespoons candied ginger chopped Dash of cayenne
4 tablespoons oil

Melt the jelly, add ginger, cool slightly; add oil, lemon juice, and cayenne.

337.—DEVILLED HAM DRESSING

1 egg ¼ teaspoon salt
1 small can devilled ham 1/8 teaspoon pepper
½ cup vinegar ¼ teaspoon mustard
¼ cup water ¼ teaspoon cornstarch

Beat egg, add ham, vinegar, and water; mix salt, pepper, mustard, and cornstarch; add to ham mixture; and cook over hot water ten minutes.

338.—FRENCH DRESSING

2/3 cup oil ½ teaspoon pepper
1/3 cup vinegar ¼ teaspoon mustard
1¼ teaspoons salt 1 teaspoon powdered sugar

Put the ingredients in a pint preserve jar; fasten the cover, chill, and shake well before using. Keep in the ice-box and use as needed. For use with fruit salad, omit mustard. Curry, Brand's A 1 sauce, Worcestershire sauce, tomato ketchup, or similar condiments may be added in small amounts to vary the flavor.

339.—MAYONNAISE DRESSING

Yolk of 1 egg ½ teaspoon paprika
1 teaspoon salt 1 cup salad oil
½ teaspoon powdered sugar 2 tablespoons vinegar
1 teaspoon mustard 1 tablespoon lemon juice

Beat the egg yolk; add the seasonings; add oil, a few drops at a time, until mixture thickens; mix vinegar and[Pg 128] lemon juice, and add in small quantities, alternating with the oil; as the oil thickens the dressing, dilute with the acid, leaving the finished dressing thick. It is important to have ingredients and utensils cold.

340.—POTATO MAYONNAISE

½ cup mashed potatoes ½ teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
2 tablespoons oil ¼ teaspoon salt
3 tablespoons vinegar ¼ teaspoon mustard
1 teaspoon horseradish ¼ teaspoon sugar

Mix in order given and serve with vegetable salad or cold meat.

341.—RUSSIAN DRESSING

To Mayonnaise Dressing (see No. 339) add one-third cup of thick chili sauce. Cooked salad dressing may be used in place of mayonnaise.

342.—SOUR CREAM DRESSING

½ cup sour cream 1 teaspoon powdered sugar
¼ teaspoon salt 3 tablespoons chili sauce

Beat cream until stiff; add salt, sugar, and chili sauce.

343.—QUICK MAYONNAISE

3 tablespoons butter ½ teaspoon sugar
½ teaspoon salt 3 tablespoons oil
½ teaspoon mustard 1 tablespoon vinegar
¼ teaspoon paprika 1 egg

Cream butter, add seasonings, and when well mixed add oil all at once; mix well, add vinegar; mix well, add the well-beaten egg yolk, and fold in the stiffly beaten white of egg. Do not chill.[Pg 129]

344.—UNCOOKED SALAD DRESSING (Condensed Milk)

2 eggs beaten 1½ teaspoons salt
1 can condensed milk 1½ teaspoons mustard
¼ cup melted butter Dash of cayenne
1 cup vinegar

Mix, and beat with egg beater until thickened.

345.—CHICKEN SALAD

2 cups cold cooked chicken Lettuce
2 cups celery cut fine 1 hard-cooked egg
Salad dressing

Cut remnants of chicken in small pieces and mix with celery and salad dressing; arrange on lettuce leaves and garnish with dressing and egg thinly sliced. Cabbage and a little celery salt may be used in place of celery.

346.—CORONADO SALAD

1 can tuna fish Cooked Dressing (see No. 334)
2 cups shredded cabbage 2 tablespoons tomato ketchup
1 green pepper cooked and shredded

Flake fish; shred cabbage very fine; cut pepper in halves, remove seeds, cook in boiling water ten minutes, and shred in inch lengths; mix, arrange on lettuce, and dress with boiled dressing, to which the ketchup has been added. Garnish with parsley or pimiento.

347.—MEAT AND POTATO SALAD

1½ cups cooked meat cut fine ½ teaspoon salt
1½ cups cooked potato cut fine 2 tablespoons finely chopped pickle
½ cup celery cut fine Salad dressing

Mix in order given, cover with dressing, and garnish with sliced pickles and celery tops. White cabbage may be used in place of celery.[Pg 130]

348.—SALMON SALAD

1 can salmon 2 finely chopped pickles
1 cup cooked potato cubes Cooked Dressing (see No. 334)
1 cup shredded lettuce Lettuce

Rinse salmon with boiling water, and separate into flakes; mix with potato, lettuce, and pickles, arrange on lettuce, and cover with dressing. Garnish with sliced hard-cooked egg and parsley.

349.—SHRIMP SALAD

1 pint cooked shrimps ¾ cup salad dressing
1 cup chopped white cabbage 1 head lettuce
2 tablespoons capers

Clean shrimps and break in pieces, reserving a few of the largest; mix with cabbage, capers, and dressing, and serve in lettuce nests. Garnish with whole shrimps. Canned shrimps may be used.

350.—TUNA FISH SALAD

1 can tuna fish Salad dressing
2 cups cooked potato cubes Lettuce
½ cup cooked beet

Flake tuna fish, mix with potatoes cut into fine cubes, and the beet cut into inch shreds; arrange on lettuce or any crisp salad green; and dress with Cooked Dressing (see No. 334) or Mayonnaise (see No. 339).

351.—BAKED BEAN SALAD

2 cups cold baked beans 1 cup Cooked Dressing (see No. 334)
1 cup cooked potato cubes 2 tablespoons tomato ketchup
½ cup chopped cooked beet 2 tablespoons chopped pickle

Mix beans, potato, and beets; add ketchup and pickle to dressing, mix with vegetables, and serve on lettuce or any crisp salad green. Garnish with radishes.[Pg 131]

352.—BERMUDA ONION SALAD

6 Bermuda onions ½ bay leaf
2 quarts boiling water Small piece lemon peel
1 dozen pepper corns Lettuce
4 cloves French Dressing (see No. 338)
½ teaspoon salt

Peel and quarter onions, and cook in boiling water with seasonings until tender; drain, cool, arrange on lettuce, and cover with dressing. Garnish with red radishes.

353.—CABBAGE AND BEET SALAD

3 cups shredded cabbage 2 tablespoons vinegar
3 beets finely chopped ¼ teaspoon white mustard seed
¼ teaspoon salt Cooked Dressing (see No. 334)

Mix cabbage, beets, salt, vinegar, and mustard seed; arrange on small white cabbage leaves, and dress with cooked dressing. Garnish with parsley.

354.—CABBAGE AND CRANBERRY SALAD

3 cups finely shredded white cabbage ½ cup chopped cranberries
½ cup finely shredded celery

Mix with Cooked Dressing (see No. 334), and garnish with celery tops and whole cranberries.

355.—CELERY ROOT SALAD

2 cups Creamed Celery Root (see No. 253) 1 cup shredded white cabbage
1 cup chopped apple

Mix, and serve on lettuce with Cooked Dressing (see No. 334) or Mayonnaise Dressing (see No. 339).[Pg 132]

356.—DUTCH POTATO SALAD

6 boiled potatoes ¼ teaspoon celery seed
½ onion finely chopped ¼ teaspoon white mustard seed
1 teaspoon salt ¼ cup bacon fat
¼ teaspoon pepper ½ cup hot vinegar

Cut potatoes into half-inch cubes; add onion, salt, pepper, celery, and mustard seed; heat bacon fat, add vinegar, and pour over potatoes; let stand until cold, and serve on any crisp salad green. Garnish with pickled beet.

357.—LEEK SALAD

Cut leeks in half-inch slices and cook in boiling salted water until tender; drain, chill, and serve on lettuce with French Dressing (see No. 338); sprinkle with chopped parsley and paprika.

358.—PEPPER AND CABBAGE SALAD

½ small white cabbage 1 red pepper
1 green pepper Salad dressing

Shred cabbage into fine inch shreds; remove seeds and veins from peppers, and cut into fine shreds. Mix with dressing and arrange on small inner cabbage leaves. Garnish with parsley and strips of red pepper.

359.—POTATO SALAD

6 potatoes ½ teaspoon salt
1 onion ½ teaspoon paprika
½ teaspoon celery seed Salad dressing
¼ teaspoon mustard seed

Pare potatoes, cut in halves, and cook in boiling salted water with the onion until tender; cool, cut in half-inch cubes, add seasonings, and mix with dressing. Cover with[Pg 133] dressing, and garnish with parsley, red beets, or cooked carrot. Devilled Ham Dressing (see No. 337) is excellent with potato salad.

360.—SWEET POTATO SALAD

3 cups of cooked sweet potato cubes 4 tablespoons oil
1 cup white cabbage or celery finely chopped 1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
2 tablespoons vinegar ½ teaspoon salt

Mix and serve on heart cabbage leaves, and garnish with parsley and pickles.

361.—SAMOSET SALAD

Arrange lettuce in salad bowl, cover with slices of pickled beets, and sprinkle thickly with cottage cheese. Cover with dressing made of three tablespoons each of beet vinegar and oil, one-fourth teaspoon salt, and one-eighth teaspoon pepper.

362.—SPANISH SALAD

1 head of lettuce 3 tomatoes quartered
2 cups of half-inch cubes of bread French Dressing (see No. 338)
1 Spanish onion chopped fine 2 sliced pickles
1 cucumber sliced

Shred the coarser leaves of the lettuce, and arrange in salad bowl on heart leaves; cover with bread cubes, sprinkle with onion, add cucumber and tomatoes, and pour French dressing over all. Garnish with pickles.[Pg 134]

363.—SPANISH ONION AND TOMATO SALAD

1 head lettuce 1 green pepper
4 mild onions French Dressing (see No. 338)
2 ripe tomatoes

Wash and dry lettuce, and arrange in salad bowl; peel onions, cut in very thin slices, and put on lettuce; peel and slice tomatoes, and place on onions; cut pepper in thin slices, remove seeds and veins, and place on tomatoes; cover with French dressing, and serve very cold with brown bread sandwiches.

364.—TOMATO JELLY SALAD

1 can tomatoes 1/8 teaspoon soda
½ onion Dash of cayenne
4 cloves ½ bay leaf
1 teaspoon salt ½ box gelatine
1 teaspoon sugar ½ cup cold water

Cook tomatoes and seasonings for twenty minutes; soak gelatine in cold water for a few minutes; add to tomato, and stir until dissolved; press through a sieve, and fill individual molds, which have been garnished with a slice of hard-cooked egg. Serve on lettuce with any dressing preferred. A small amount of clear jelly may be made by allowing mixture to drip through a jelly bag. Put into very small molds, and use as a garnish for cold meat or salads. The pulp left in the bag will make excellent soup.

365.—VEGETABLE SALAD (Cooked)

1½ cups potatoes French Dressing (see No. 338)
1 cup beets ¼ teaspoon onion juice
¾ cup white turnip 1 bouillon cube
½ cup peas

Cut potatoes, beets, and turnips into half-inch cubes, and mix with peas; dissolve bouillon cube in one tablespoon[Pg 135] of boiling water, and add with onion juice to dressing. Arrange vegetables on any crisp salad green, and pour dressing over them.

366.—APPLE AND MINT SALAD

2 cups finely cut apple 4 tablespoons oil
2 tablespoons chopped mint Few grains cayenne
2 tablespoons lemon juice 1 head lettuce
Few gratings lemon rind

Mix the mint, lemon juice, and rind, cover, and let stand for half an hour; add oil and cayenne, and pour over apple. Serve on lettuce and garnish with sprigs of mint.

367.—BANANA AND APPLE SALAD

Peel and slice three bananas; pare, core, and slice four apples; arrange on lettuce, and cover with Currant Jelly Dressing (see No. 336).

368.—BANANA AND PEANUT SALAD

Peel and scrape bananas, cut crosswise into three pieces, roll in finely chopped peanuts, and serve on lettuce with French Dressing (see No. 338).

369.—BELLEVUE SALAD

1 cup cottage cheese ¼ cup French Dressing (see No. 338)
½ cup peanut butter 1 large red apple
½ teaspoon salt Lettuce leaves

Mix cheese, butter, salt, and dressing until well blended; core apples, cut in one-third-inch slices, and cover each slice with cheese mixture forced through a rose tube; arrange on lettuce, and serve with French dressing.[Pg 136]

370.—CREAM CHEESE SALAD

Force cream cheese through potato ricer, arrange lightly on lettuce leaves, and dress with a French Dressing (see No. 338), to which two tablespoons of chili sauce have been added.

371.—FROZEN CREAM CHEESE

Mash a cream cheese, season with paprika and salt, moisten with cream, and beat until smooth; pack into individual paper cases, put into a tightly covered tin, and pack in equal parts of salt and ice for three hours. Serve on lettuce with French Dressing (see No. 338), and garnish with bits of currant jelly or Mock Bar-le-Duc Currants (see No. 666).

372.—JELLIED WALDORF SALAD

½ package gelatine 1 cup celery shredded
½ cup cold water ½ cup nut meats chopped
1 cup boiling water Lettuce
¼ cup sugar 6 pimolas sliced
¼ cup lemon juice Mayonnaise
2 cups apple chopped

Soak gelatine in cold water five minutes, add boiling water, sugar, and lemon juice; chill until it begins to stiffen; add apples, celery, and nuts; turn into individual molds, and chill. Serve on lettuce, and garnish with pimolas and mayonnaise.

373.—ORANGE AND CRESS SALAD

1 bunch water cress 4 seedless oranges
1 head romaine French Dressing (see No. 338)

Pick over, wash, and dry cress; wash and dry romaine, and arrange in salad bowl; peel and cut oranges in thin[Pg 137] slices, and arrange over romaine; put cress around edge of bowl, and cover all with French dressing made with lemon juice instead of vinegar.

374.—PEAR SALAD

5 pears 1 teaspoon Jamaica ginger
Lettuce 1 teaspoon powdered sugar
4 tablespoons oil ½ teaspoon paprika
2 tablespoons lemon juice

Pare, quarter, and core fruit; wash and dry lettuce; shred finely the outer leaves, and arrange on the heart leaves; cut quarters of pears lengthwise, place on lettuce, and cover with dressing made of oil, lemon juice, and seasonings. The pears should not be too ripe.

375.—PINEAPPLE, CHEESE, AND DATE SALAD

For each person allow two lettuce leaves, one slice of pineapple, and three dates stuffed with cream cheese. Cut the pineapple in cubes and place on the lettuce; cut dates in halves lengthwise, remove stones, stuff with cream cheese, and arrange on pineapple; sprinkle cheese with paprika, and dress all with French Dressing (see No. 338).

376.—PINEAPPLE AND COTTAGE CHEESE SALAD

Arrange slices of pineapple on crisp lettuce; in the center of each slice place a cottage cheese ball rolled in chopped nut meats; dress with French Dressing (see No. 338).[Pg 138]


CHAPTER XVII

YEAST BREADS, MUFFINS, AND ROLLS

377.—WHITE BREAD

1 cup scalded milk 2½ teaspoons salt
1 cup boiling water ½ yeast cake
1 tablespoon sugar ¼ cup lukewarm water
2 tablespoons shortening 6 to 7 cups flour

Put liquid, sugar, shortening, and salt in the mixing bowl; when lukewarm add the yeast cake (which has been dissolved in lukewarm water); add flour and knead well. The exact amount of flour will depend upon the quality; but enough should be used to make a smooth, soft dough which after kneading is not sticky. Cover, and let rise in a warm room until double in bulk; cut down, knead well, and shape into loaves; cover, let rise until double in bulk, and bake in a hot oven about fifty minutes. To hurry the rising of the bread increase the quantity of yeast. Bread mixed with two yeast cakes may be made and baked in about three hours.

378.—BRAN BREAD (Yeast)

½ cup boiling water ½ yeast cake
½ cup scalded milk ¼ cup lukewarm water
2 tablespoons shortening 1 cup entire wheat flour
2 tablespoons molasses 1 cup white flour
1½ teaspoons salt 2 cups bran

Mix water, milk, shortening, molasses, and salt; when lukewarm add yeast cake dissolved in lukewarm water, add[Pg 139] flour sifted, and bran, and mix with liquid to a soft dough; let rise until light, cut down, and knead into small loaves, using more bran if necessary to prevent sticking; let rise until nearly double, and bake in hot oven about fifty minutes.

379.—ENTIRE WHEAT BREAD

Follow recipe for White Bread (see No. 377), using four cups of entire wheat flour and two or more cups of white flour. Molasses may be used in place of sugar.

380.—DATE BREAD (Not Kneaded)

1 cup scalded milk ½ yeast cake
1 cup boiling water ¼ cup lukewarm water
4 cup molasses 4 cups entire wheat flour
2 tablespoons shortening 1¼ cups white flour
2 teaspoons salt 1 cup dates cut in pieces

Mix milk, water, molasses, shortening, and salt; when lukewarm, add yeast, dissolved in lukewarm water, and flour; mix, and beat well; let rise until double in bulk; add dates, beat well, turn into two greased bread pans, let rise until light, and bake one hour. The oven should be hot for the first fifteen minutes, and then the heat should be reduced.

381.—FRIED BREAD

Cut raised bread dough into pieces the size of a small egg, flatten with the rolling pin, cover, let rise until light, and fry in deep fat about three minutes.[Pg 140]

382.—GRAHAM AND CORN BREAD

1 cup corn meal ¼ cup molasses
1 cup boiling water ½ yeast cake
1 cup scalded milk ¼ cup lukewarm water
2 tablespoons shortening 4 cups Graham flour
2½ teaspoons salt

Pour boiling water over corn meal; mix well, add milk and shortening; when lukewarm add salt, molasses, and yeast dissolved in lukewarm water; add flour, beat well, and let rise until double in bulk; beat again, pour into two greased bread pans, let rise until light, and bake about fifty minutes. The oven should be hot for the first fifteen minutes, and then the heat reduced.

383.—IRISH BREAD

1 quart bread dough ¼ cup sugar
1/3 cup shortening 1 cup raisins seeded and chopped

Knead shortening, sugar, and raisins into dough; shape into two round loaves, let rise, brush with milk, and bake in hot oven about forty minutes.

384.—OATMEAL BREAD

1 cup rolled oats ½ yeast cake
½ cup corn meal ¼ cup lukewarm water
1½ teaspoons salt ½ cup molasses
1 tablespoon shortening 4 cups flour
2 cups boiling water

Mix oats, corn meal, salt, and shortening; add boiling water, and let stand one hour; add yeast dissolved in lukewarm water, molasses, and flour. Mix well, cover, and let rise until double in bulk; beat well, turn into two[Pg 141] greased pans, let rise, and bake in a hot oven about fifty minutes.

385.—RYE BREAD

1 cup scalded milk ½ yeast cake
1 cup boiling water ¼ cup lukewarm water
2 tablespoons shortening 3 cups rye flour
3 tablespoons molasses 3 to 4 cups white flour
2 teaspoons salt

Mix; let rise and bake the same as White Bread (see No. 377).

386.—SHREDDED WHEAT BREAD

2 shredded wheat biscuit 1 tablespoon shortening
1 cup hot milk ½ yeast cake
1 cup hot water ¼ cup lukewarm water
½ cup molasses 6 cups entire wheat flour
1 tablespoon salt

Crumble the biscuit; add milk, water, molasses, salt, and shortening; when lukewarm add yeast cake dissolved in lukewarm water, and sifted flour; knead well, cover and let rise until double in bulk; cut down, shape into loaves or biscuit, put into greased pans, let rise until light, and bake in a hot oven about fifty minutes for loaves, and twenty-five minutes for biscuit. This makes one loaf and one pan of biscuit. A little more or less flour may be needed.

387.—BUNS

1 cup scalded milk ½ yeast cake
1/3 cup shortening ¼ cup lukewarm water
¼ cup sugar ½ cup currants
1 teaspoon salt 3½ cups flour

Mix milk, shortening, sugar, and salt; when lukewarm, add yeast dissolved in lukewarm water; add currants, and[Pg 142] flour enough to knead (a little more or less than the three and one-half cups may be required); let rise until double in bulk; knead, and shape into small round buns; place in a greased baking pan two inches apart, and let rise until light; brush with milk, dust with powdered sugar, and bake in a hot oven about twenty minutes.

388.—CRESCENTS

Use Parker House Roll mixture (see No. 389) or any bread dough into which more shortening has been kneaded; roll out half an inch thick, cut into four-inch squares, and cut squares in halves diagonally; brush with melted shortening, and roll firmly, beginning with the diagonal edge. Curve into crescent shape, place on greased baking sheet, let rise until light, and bake in a hot oven about fifteen minutes.

389.—PARKER HOUSE ROLLS

2 cups milk 1 yeast cake
1/3 cup shortening ¼ cup lukewarm water
1 teaspoon salt 6 to 7 cups flour
2 tablespoons sugar

Scald milk; add shortening, salt, and sugar; when cool add yeast dissolved in water; stir in two cups of flour, cover, and let rise until double in bulk; add enough flour to form a soft dough; knead well, and let rise again; cut down with a knife; roll out on lightly floured bread board until about half an inch thick; cut with small round cutter, brush with butter, and fold double; put on baking sheet, cover, and let rise until light, brush with milk, and bake in hot oven about twelve minutes.[Pg 143]

390.—SHAMROCK ROLLS

To one quart of bread dough add one-fourth cup of melted shortening and two tablespoons of sugar. Knead well, and shape into small balls about the size of a pecan nut; grease muffin tins, put three balls in each, let rise until light, and bake in a hot oven about fifteen minutes.

391.—SWEDISH COFFEE ROLLS

1 cup scalded milk ½ yeast cake
1/3 cup shortening ¼ cup lukewarm water
1 teaspoon salt 3½ cups flour
¼ cup sugar 1 teaspoon cinnamon
1 egg well beaten 2 tablespoons sugar

Scald milk, add shortening, salt, and sugar; when lukewarm add egg, yeast dissolved in water, and flour, of which a little more or less may be required; knead well, cover, and let rise until double in bulk; knead again; roll on a floured board until about one-fourth of an inch thick, brush with melted shortening, and sprinkle with cinnamon mixed with sugar; fold dough into three layers, cut in strips three-quarters of an inch thick; twist each strip, and shape like a figure eight, pressing the ends firmly in place; put on a greased baking sheet, let rise until light, and bake in a hot oven twenty minutes. Spread with a thin coating of plain icing.

392.—RAISED MUFFINS

½ cup boiling water 1 egg
½ cup scalded milk ¼ yeast cake
1 teaspoon salt ¼ cup lukewarm water
2 tablespoons sugar 2½ cups flour
2 tablespoons shortening

Pour water and milk over salt, sugar, and shortening; when cool add beaten egg, yeast dissolved in water, and[Pg 144] flour; beat well and let rise over night; beat again; fill greased muffin pans two-thirds full, let rise, and bake in a hot oven thirty minutes. Or place greased muffin rings on a hot greased griddle, fill two-thirds full, and cook on top of range about twenty minutes, turning when half cooked.

393.—RAISED CORN MUFFINS

1 cup scalded milk ¼ yeast cake
4 tablespoons shortening ¼ cup lukewarm water
4 tablespoons sugar 1 cup corn meal
1 teaspoon salt 1½ cups flour

Add shortening, sugar, and salt to milk; when lukewarm add yeast dissolved in water, corn meal, and flour; beat well, let rise over night; beat well, half fill greased muffin rings, let rise until nearly double, and bake in hot oven half an hour.

394.—RAISED DATE MUFFINS

Follow recipe for Date Bread (see No. 380); half fill greased muffin tins, let rise until light, and bake in a hot oven twenty-five minutes. Figs cut in small pieces may be used instead of dates.

395.—RAISED OATMEAL MUFFINS (Uncooked Oats)

1 cup rolled oats 1 egg
1 cup scalded milk ¼ yeast cake
2 tablespoons shortening ¼ cup lukewarm water
1 teaspoon salt 2½ cups flour
¼ cup molasses

Pour hot milk over oats, add shortening; when lukewarm add salt, molasses, egg well beaten, and yeast cake dissolved in lukewarm water; beat well, and add flour;[Pg 145] beat well, and let rise over night; beat again, and half fill greased muffin pans; let rise until nearly double, and bake in a hot oven half an hour.

396.—RAISED ROULETTES

Roll out to one-half inch thickness any roll or soft raised bread mixture; brush with melted butter, and spread with cinnamon and sugar, fruit, or any of the fillings used for Baking Powder Roulettes (see No. 447). Roll like a jelly roll until dough is about two and one-half inches in diameter, cut in half-inch slices with a sharp knife, place on greased sheet two inches apart, let rise until light, and bake in a hot oven twenty minutes.[Pg 146]


CHAPTER XVIII

BAKING POWDER BREADS, MUFFINS, AND BISCUIT[10]

397.—BAKING POWDER

1 pound 2 ounces pure cream of tartar ¼ pound cornstarch
½ pound cooking soda

Mix and sift thoroughly four times, and store in closely covered jars.

398.—BARLEY BREAD

2 cups barley meal 1 teaspoon salt
1 cup Graham flour 6 teaspoons baking powder
1 cup white flour 2 cups milk
2 tablespoons sugar

Sift dry ingredients together, and mix well with milk; turn into a greased bread tin, let stand fifteen minutes, and bake in a moderate oven fifty minutes. Raisins, dates, figs, or nuts may be added.

399.—BRAN BREAD

2 cups bran 5 teaspoons baking powder
2 cups entire wheat flour ½ cup molasses
1 teaspoon salt ¾ cup water
½ teaspoon soda ¾ cup milk

Sift flour, salt, soda, and baking powder, and add to bran; add molasses and liquid, and beat well; turn into a[Pg 147] greased bread pan; let stand fifteen minutes, and bake in a moderate oven one hour.

400.—DATE BREAD

1 cup corn meal ¼ cup molasses
1 cup entire wheat flour 1 cup dates stoned and cut in pieces
1 cup white flour ½ cup nut meats chopped
1½ teaspoons salt 1 egg well beaten
¼ teaspoon soda 1¼ cups milk
5 teaspoons baking powder

Mix and sift dry ingredients; add other ingredients in order given; mix well, turn into a greased bread pan, cover with a cloth, let stand fifteen minutes; bake in a moderate oven fifty minutes.

401.—DARK NUT BREAD

¼ cup sugar 1 cup bread flour
¾ cup hot water 5 teaspoons baking powder
½ cup molasses 1½ teaspoons salt
¾ cup milk ½ teaspoon soda
2 cups entire wheat flour ¾ cup nut meats finely chopped

Mix in order given, sifting dry materials together before adding. Turn into a greased bread pan, let stand fifteen minutes, and bake in a moderate oven one hour.

402.—QUICK RAISIN BREAD

2½ cups entire wheat flour ¼ cup sugar
½ cup fine corn meal 1 beaten egg
6 teaspoons baking powder 1¼ cups milk
1 teaspoon salt 1 cup seeded raisins cut in halves

Mix and sift dry ingredients; add egg, milk, and raisins, and mix well; put into a greased bread pan, cover, and[Pg 148] let stand fifteen minutes; bake in a moderate oven about fifty minutes. One cup of finely chopped nuts may be added.

403.—BREAD CRUMB BROWN BREAD

1½ cups dried sifted crumbs ½ cup corn meal
1 cup boiling water 1 cup Graham flour
½ cup molasses ¾ teaspoon salt
1 cup milk 1½ teaspoons soda

Put crumbs in mixing dish, add boiling water, and let stand ten minutes; add molasses, milk, and the dry ingredients sifted together. Steam the same as Steamed Indian Date Bread (see No. 404).

404.—STEAMED INDIAN DATE BREAD

1½ cups corn meal 2/3 cup molasses
1 cup rye meal 1 cup water
½ cup flour 1 cup milk
1½ teaspoons soda 1 cup dates
1 teaspoon salt

Mix and sift dry ingredients, add molasses, liquid, and dates which have been stoned and cut in pieces. Pour into greased one-pound baking powder boxes, and steam steadily for one and three-quarters hours. Or pour into a large greased mold and steam for three hours.

405.—CORN BREAD (without Eggs)

¾ cup corn meal ½ teaspoon salt
¾ cup flour ¾ teaspoon soda
2 tablespoons sugar 1½ cups buttermilk or sour milk

Mix and sift dry ingredients, add buttermilk gradually, and beat well; pour into well-greased shallow pan, and bake in hot oven twenty minutes.[Pg 149]

406.—COUNTRY CORN BREAD

¾ cup corn meal 1/3 teaspoon salt
¾ cup flour 1 beaten egg
3 teaspoons baking powder ¾ cup milk and water mixed
1 tablespoon sugar 2 tablespoons melted bacon fat

Mix in order given, beat well, and bake in a well-greased shallow pan in a hot oven about twenty minutes. Half of the egg will make a very good corn bread. Left-over pieces may be split, lightly buttered, and browned in the oven.

407.—CORN MUFFINS

1 cup corn meal 2 tablespoons sugar
1 cup flour 1 beaten egg
4 teaspoons baking powder 1 cup milk and water mixed
½ teaspoon salt 4 tablespoons melted shortening

Mix in order given, beat well, and bake in greased gem pans in hot oven twenty minutes.

408.—CORN AND RICE MUFFINS

1 cup cooked rice 1 tablespoon sugar
2/3 cup hot milk 1 egg
½ cup corn meal ½ cup flour
2 tablespoons bacon fat 3 teaspoons baking powder
½ teaspoon salt

Pour hot milk over rice, and work with a fork to separate grains; add corn meal, bacon fat, salt, and sugar; when cool add egg well beaten, flour, and baking powder; beat well; bake in well-greased muffin pans in hot oven twenty minutes.[Pg 150]

409.—CUSTARD CORN CAKE

½ cup corn meal 1 cup sour milk
½ cup flour 1 egg
2 tablespoons sugar 2 tablespoons melted shortening
½ teaspoon salt ½ cup sweet milk
½ teaspoon soda

Mix and sift dry ingredients; add sour milk and egg well beaten, and beat thoroughly; melt shortening in an earthen baking dish, pour in batter, pour the sweet milk over it, and bake in a hot oven twenty-five minutes. Cut in wedge-shaped pieces for serving.

410.—MOLASSES CORN BREAD

1 cup corn meal 1 egg
1 cup flour ¼ cup molasses
4 teaspoons baking powder 1 cup water
½ teaspoon salt 2 tablespoons melted bacon fat

Mix and sift dry ingredients; add egg well beaten, molasses, water, and bacon fat; beat well, pour into a well-greased shallow pan, and bake about twenty minutes in a hot oven.

411.—RHODE ISLAND CORN CAKE

1 cup white corn meal 2 tablespoons sugar
1 cup flour 1 egg
4 teaspoons baking powder ¼ cup melted shortening
½ teaspoon salt 1 cup milk

Mix and sift dry ingredients; add egg yolk well beaten, shortening, and milk; beat well; fold in the stiffly beaten white of egg, and bake in a greased, shallow pan in hot oven about twenty minutes.[Pg 151]

412.—BLUEBERRY MUFFINS

Follow recipe for Cambridge Muffins (see No. 414); add one cup of blueberries just before putting into the pans. If canned blueberries are used, drain, and dredge with flour before adding to batter.

413.—BRAN MUFFINS

2 cups bran ½ cup molasses
1 cup flour 1¾ cups milk
½ teaspoon salt 1 tablespoon melted shortening
1 teaspoon soda

Mix in order given; beat well, and bake in moderate oven about twenty-five minutes. These muffins are moist, keep well, and may be reheated successfully in a covered pan, either over steam or in the oven.

414.—CAMBRIDGE MUFFINS

¼ cup shortening 2 cups flour
¼ cup sugar 4 teaspoons baking powder
1 egg ¼ teaspoon salt
¾ cup milk

Cream the shortening; add the sugar and egg well beaten; beat well, add the milk, flour, baking powder, and salt, which have been sifted together; beat again, and bake in hot greased muffin pans twenty minutes in a moderate oven.

415.—CHEESE MUFFINS

Use recipe for Plain Muffins (see No. 419) or any muffin recipe, omitting the sugar; cut cheese in half-inch cubes, and place three or four pieces on top of each muffin before baking.[Pg 152]

416.—CRANBERRY MUFFINS

Follow recipe for Cambridge Muffins (see No. 414), and add one cup of cranberries coarsely chopped.

417.—CRUMB MUFFINS

1 cup dried and sifted bread crumbs 1 egg
1 tablespoon shortening ½ cup milk
1 tablespoon sugar ¾ cup flour
½ teaspoon salt 3 teaspoons baking powder
½ cup boiling water

Mix crumbs, shortening, sugar, salt, and boiling water; when cool add the egg well beaten, the milk, flour, and baking powder; beat well and bake in greased muffin pans twenty minutes in a moderate oven.

418.—DATE MUFFINS

To recipe for Plain Muffins (see No. 419) or Cambridge Muffins (see No. 414) add one cup dates, stoned and cut in small pieces.

419.—PLAIN MUFFINS

2 cups flour 1 egg
4 teaspoons baking powder 1 cup milk
½ teaspoon salt 2 tablespoons melted shortening
2 tablespoons sugar

Mix and sift dry ingredients; add egg well beaten, milk, and shortening; beat well, and bake in greased muffin pans in moderate oven twenty minutes. For fruit muffins add one cup of figs, dates, or cooked prunes cut in pieces.[Pg 153]

420.—RYE MUFFINS

1 cup rye flour 2 tablespoons molasses
1 cup white flour 1 egg
½ teaspoon salt 2 tablespoons melted shortening
4 teaspoons baking powder 1 cup milk

Mix and sift dry ingredients, add molasses, egg well beaten, shortening, and milk; beat well, half fill greased muffin tins, and bake in moderate oven twenty minutes.

421.—SOUR MILK MUFFINS

1½ cups flour 1 egg
1 tablespoon sugar 1 cup thick sour milk
½ teaspoon soda 2 tablespoons melted shortening
½ teaspoon salt

Mix and sift dry ingredients; add egg well beaten, sour milk, and shortening; beat quickly, and bake in greased muffin pans in moderate oven twenty minutes.

422.—BUTTERMILK MUFFINS

Follow recipe for Sour Milk Muffins (see No. 421), using buttermilk instead of sour milk.

423.—SALLY LUNN

2 cups flour 2 eggs
4 teaspoons baking powder 1 cup milk
½ teaspoon salt ¼ cup melted shortening
2 tablespoons sugar

Mix and sift dry ingredients; add eggs well beaten, milk, and shortening; beat thoroughly, pour into shallow greased pan, and bake in a moderate oven twenty minutes.[Pg 154]

424.—BAKING POWDER BISCUIT

2 cups flour 2 tablespoons shortening
4 teaspoons baking powder ¾ cup milk
1 teaspoon salt

Mix and sift dry ingredients, rub in shortening until fine and crumbly, and add milk to form a soft dough; a little more or less may be required, according to the brand of flour used. Roll out on a slightly floured board until three-fourths of an inch thick, cut with small cutter, place on greased pan an inch apart, and bake in hot oven twelve minutes. For soft biscuit with little crust, place close together in the pan, and bake five minutes longer. Left-over biscuit may be split, lightly buttered, and browned in the oven.

425.—CORN MEAL ROLLS

1 cup corn meal ½ teaspoon salt
1 cup flour 3 tablespoons bacon fat
4 teaspoons baking powder ¾ cup milk

Mix and sift dry ingredients; rub in shortening with finger tips; add milk, and mix thoroughly; roll lightly, on a floured board, to a thickness of one-half inch; cut with biscuit cutter, brush with milk or water, and fold double. Bake in hot oven fifteen minutes.

426.—BACON SANDWICH ROLLS

Follow recipe for Corn Meal Rolls (see No. 425), putting a piece of cooked bacon on half of roll before folding.

427.—DATE ROLLS

Use recipe for Baking Powder Biscuit (see No. 424), roll out one-half inch thick, and cut in rounds with three-inch[Pg 155] cutter; spread with soft butter, sprinkle with cinnamon and sugar, and put a date, split lengthwise and stoned, on half of each roll; fold over, press edges firmly together, brush with milk, and bake in hot oven fifteen minutes. Allow one-half teaspoon cinnamon to two tablespoons sugar. Cooked and stoned prunes or chopped figs may be used instead of dates.

428.—QUICK COFFEE CAKE

¼ cup shortening 2½ cups flour
¼ cup sugar 5 teaspoons baking powder
1 egg ½ teaspoon salt
1 cup milk and water mixed 2 tablespoons sugar
½ cup seedless raisins 1 teaspoon cinnamon

Cream the shortening and sugar; add egg well beaten, milk, raisins, flour, baking powder, and salt; spread in a greased shallow pan, brush with melted butter, and sprinkle with cinnamon and sugar; bake in hot oven fifteen to twenty minutes.

429.—QUICK DROP BISCUIT

Use recipe for Baking Powder Biscuit (see No. 424), increasing the milk to one cupful; drop from a tablespoon on a greased pan two inches apart, and bake in a hot oven ten minutes; or half fill greased muffin tins, and bake twelve minutes.

430.—ENTIRE WHEAT BISCUIT

Follow directions for Baking Powder Biscuit (see No. 424), using entire wheat flour in place of white flour, and adding one tablespoon of molasses.[Pg 156]

431.—FRUIT TEA BISCUIT

To recipe for Quick Drop Biscuit (see No. 429) add one chopped apple, one-half cup of seeded and chopped raisins, two tablespoons of washed currants, and two tablespoons of sugar. Put into hot greased muffin pans, and bake in a hot oven fifteen minutes. Serve for tea, or with a hot liquid sauce for dessert.

432.—GRAHAM BISCUIT

1 cup Graham flour ½ teaspoon salt
½ cup fine corn meal 2 tablespoons shortening
½ cup bran 1 tablespoon molasses
4 teaspoons baking powder ¾ cup milk

Mix dry ingredients without sifting; rub in shortening with finger tips; add molasses and milk; mix well; roll, cut, and bake as directed for Baking Powder Biscuit (see No. 424).

433.—JAM ROLLS

2 cups flour 2 tablespoons shortening
4 teaspoons baking powder 1 egg
1 teaspoon salt 2/3 cup milk
1 tablespoon sugar

Sift together flour, baking powder, salt, and sugar; rub in shortening with finger tips until mealy; add beaten egg and milk, and mix with a knife to a soft dough; roll out one-third of an inch thick, and cut with a round cutter; put a teaspoon of jam on each, moisten the edges with water, fold over, and press firmly together; make two cuts on top so that jam will show, brush with milk, and bake in hot oven fifteen minutes.[Pg 157]

434.—POTATO SCONES

2 cups flour 1 cup mashed potato
½ teaspoon salt 2 tablespoons shortening
4 tablespoons baking powder ¾ cup milk

Sift flour, salt, and baking powder; add potato and shortening, and work in with finger tips; add milk, and mix to a soft dough with a knife; roll out three-quarters of an inch thick on floured board, cut with biscuit cutter, and cook on hot greased griddle about twenty minutes, turning over when half cooked. Split, butter, and serve hot.

435.—SCOTCH SCONES

1 cup fine oatmeal 4 teaspoons baking powder
¾ cup scalded milk 1 teaspoon salt
2 tablespoons shortening 2 tablespoons sugar
1 cup flour

Pour hot milk over oatmeal, mix well, add shortening, and let stand until cold; mix and sift flour, baking powder, salt, and sugar; add to oatmeal, and mix well; roll out three-fourths of an inch thick, cut in rounds, and cook on a greased griddle about twenty minutes, turning when half cooked.

WITHOUT BAKING POWDER OR YEAST

436.—POPOVERS

1 cup flour 1 cup milk
¼ teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon melted butter
1 egg

Sift flour and salt; beat egg very light, and mix with milk; mix gradually with flour; add melted butter, and[Pg 158] beat two minutes with a strong egg beater; pour into hot greased popover cups or pans, and bake in a hot oven twenty to thirty minutes, according to size of pans. The mixture should be very cold, and the pans and oven very hot.

437.—ENTIRE WHEAT POPOVERS

¾ cup entire wheat flour 1 cup milk
¼ cup corn meal 1 egg
¼ teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon melted butter

Follow directions for mixing and baking Popovers (see No. 436).

438.—GRAHAM POPOVERS

Follow recipe for Entire Wheat Popovers (see No. 437), except that Graham flour should be used in place of entire wheat.

439.—BREAKFAST PUFFS

1 cup entire wheat flour 1 cup ice water
¼ teaspoon salt

Sift flour and salt, add ice water gradually, and beat three minutes with strong egg beater; bake in hot iron pans in very hot oven twenty minutes.

440.—MARYLAND BEATEN BISCUIT

2 cups flour 2 tablespoons shortening
½ teaspoon salt Cold water

Sift flour and salt, rub in shortening with tips of fingers, and add enough cold water to make a stiff dough; knead until smooth, and beat with the rolling-pin fifteen minutes, or until dough blisters; roll out about one-third of[Pg 159] an inch thick, cut with a small round cutter, prick with a fork, place on a greased baking pan, and chill in the ice-box for half an hour; bake about twenty-five minutes, having the oven very hot for the first ten minutes. A biscuit brake may be used instead of rolling-pin.

[Pg 160]


CHAPTER XIX

SHORTCAKES AND ROULETTES

441.—SHORTCAKE

1½ cups flour 3 tablespoons shortening
3 teaspoons baking powder 2/3 cup milk
1/3 teaspoon salt

Mix and sift flour, baking powder, and salt; rub in shortening with finger tips; add milk, and mix well with a knife. Spread in two greased layer-cake pans, patting with the back of a tablespoon until pans are evenly filled. Bake in a hot oven twelve minutes. If individual shortcakes are preferred, roll, cut with a biscuit cutter, and bake quickly about fifteen minutes; split, and put filling between and on top.

442.—APPLE AND CRANBERRY SHORTCAKE

4 apples 2 teaspoons cornstarch
½ cup cranberries 2 tablespoons sultana raisins
½ cup water A few gratings of orange peel
½ cup sugar

Core and slice apples, add cranberries and water; cook ten minutes, and press through a sieve; mix sugar and cornstarch, stir into fruit; add raisins and grated rind, and simmer ten minutes; spread between and on top of shortcake, and garnish with a few raisins.[Pg 161]

443.—BANANA SHORTCAKE

Prepare Shortcake (see No. 441), slice two small bananas over layer of hot shortcake, and sprinkle with lemon juice and powdered sugar; put on upper layer, cover with two more sliced bananas, sprinkle with lemon juice and sugar, and garnish with bits of jelly.

444.—DATE AND APPLE SHORTCAKE

½ pound dates 1/3 cup sugar
4 tart apples ¼ teaspoon nutmeg
½ cup water

Wash and stone dates, and cut in pieces; pare, core, and slice apples; simmer with dates, water, sugar, and nutmeg until thick enough to spread. Spread between and on top of Shortcake (see No. 441).

445.—PRUNE AND APPLE SHORTCAKE

1½ cups prunes 2 teaspoons cornstarch
2 apples pared and chopped Grated rind of ½ lemon
1/3 cup sugar

Wash prunes and soak over night in cold water to cover; cook in same water until tender; remove stones and return to water in which they were cooked; add apple, and heat to boiling point; add sugar mixed with cornstarch, and grated rind; cook about ten minutes, or until thick. Prepare recipe for Shortcake (see No. 441), and put sauce between and on top.

446.—STRAWBERRY SHORTCAKE

Prepare Shortcake (see No. 441); hull one box of berries, and save out a few of the largest; mash the remainder,[Pg 162] and add about one-half cup of sugar; pour half of berries over hot shortcake, put on second layer, and cover with remaining berries; garnish with large whole berries, and serve with or without plain cream. Blackberry, Raspberry, Currant, or Blueberry Shortcake may be made in the same way, the amount of sugar necessary depending upon the acidity of the fruit.

447.—ROULETTES

Use recipe for Baking Powder Biscuit (see No. 424), turn on floured board, roll out one-half inch thick, brush with soft butter, and spread with any of the following mixtures; then roll firmly like a jelly roll until dough is about two and one-half inches in diameter; cut in one-half-inch slices with a sharp knife, place on a greased sheet two inches apart, and bake in a hot oven twelve minutes.

Cheese Roulettes: Spread with four tablespoons of grated cheese seasoned with salt and cayenne.

Devilled Ham Roulettes: Spread lightly with devilled ham, or any finely chopped and well-seasoned meat.

Marmalade Roulettes: Spread lightly with any marmalade or jam.

Peanut Butter Roulettes: Spread with peanut butter and dust lightly with salt; sprinkle with salt before baking.

Raisin and Nut Roulettes: Spread with mixture of one-half cup of seeded and chopped raisins and one-fourth cup finely chopped nut meats.

Fruit Roulettes: Spread with currants, chopped citron, figs, dates, prunes, or candied ginger.[Pg 163]


CHAPTER XX

SANDWICHES AND TOASTS

448.—BAKED BEAN AND LETTUCE SANDWICHES

Press cold baked beans through a sieve; spread bread with butter, cover with a lettuce leaf, cover lettuce with beans, and sprinkle beans with chopped mustard pickle. Cover with a second piece of buttered bread. Brown bread or any dark bread may be used.

449.—CELERY AND EGG

1 cup chopped celery ¼ cup mayonnaise
1 hard-cooked egg

Put celery and egg through the food chopper, using finest cutter; add mayonnaise, and salt if necessary; spread between thin slices of buttered brown bread.

450.—CHEESE AND NUT SANDWICHES

Mix equal parts of grated American cheese and chopped nut meats; season with salt and cayenne, moisten with cream, and spread between thin buttered slices of bread.

451.—CHEESE CLUB SANDWICHES

Cut bread in half-inch slices, remove crusts, spread with Mustard Butter (see No. 459), cover with a lettuce leaf, spread with salad dressing, cover with cheese cut in thin slices, sprinkle with chopped mixed pickles, and cover[Pg 164] with a second slice of bread spread with mustard butter. Cut in quarters diagonally.

452.—CHICKEN SANDWICHES (Open)

1 cup finely chopped chicken Dash of celery salt
½ teaspoon salt ¼ cup salad dressing
Dash of cayenne

Season the chicken, add the dressing, and beat well. Butter circles of white bread, and spread with the chicken, mounding it in the center. Garnish with slices of pimolas.

453.—GIBLET SANDWICHES

Cook giblets until tender, put through food chopper, and mix with salad dressing. Spread between thin slices of buttered bread. A lettuce leaf may be added.

454.—HAM AND CHEESE SANDWICH (Hot)

Spread thin buttered slices of stale bread with finely chopped ham; cover with thin slices of American cheese; cover with another slice of bread spread with ham, and sauté in a little butter until brown. These sandwiches may be toasted if preferred.

455.—MARSHMALLOW SANDWICHES

Toast marshmallows and press while hot between ginger snaps, vanilla wafers, or butter thins.

456.—MOCK CRAB SANDWICHES

1 cup young America cheese cut fine 1 teaspoon anchovy paste
3 tablespoons milk ½ teaspoon paprika

Mix cheese to a paste with milk, anchovy, and paprika; spread between thin buttered slices of brown bread.[Pg 165]

457.—PEANUT SANDWICH FILLING

Put freshly roasted peanuts through the food chopper, using the finest cutter, season with salt, and mix to a smooth paste with cream; or dilute peanut butter with a little milk until of consistency to spread easily.

458.—RAISIN BREAD AND CHEESE SANDWICHES

Cut raisin bread in thin slices, and spread with Cottage Cheese (see No. 234) mixed to a paste with a little fruit juice or cream. Trim neatly and cut in triangles.

459.—MUSTARD BUTTER

¼ cup butter A few drops of vinegar or lemon juice
1 teaspoon dry English mustard A few grains of cayenne

Cream the butter, add the mustard and seasonings, and beat well.

460.—BREWIS

1 cup brown bread crumbled 1/8 teaspoon salt
1 cup white bread crumbled 1 tablespoon butter
1 cup milk

Put crumbled bread in a shallow pan in a slow oven until browned; put in a saucepan with milk, salt, and butter, and cook about ten minutes, beating well. Serve as cereal or dessert. Left-over corn bread or muffins may be used.

461.—BROWN BREAD TOAST WITH CHEESE AND BACON

Toast brown bread, or crisp in the oven, dip quickly into hot salted water, and arrange on serving dish. Make[Pg 166] a Sauce for Cream Toast (see No. 464), add to it one-half cup of cheese cut fine, pour over toast, and put a piece of crisp bacon on each piece.

462.—CELERY TOAST

2 cups celery cut in half-inch pieces 1/3 cup flour
3 cups hot stock or water ¼ cup milk
Salt 6 slices toast
1/8 teaspoon pepper

Cook celery in stock or water about half an hour, or until tender; add salt (if necessary), pepper, and flour mixed to a paste with the milk; stir until thickened, and simmer fifteen minutes; pour over toast, and garnish with toast points and celery tips. Use the coarser unbleached pieces of celery for cooking.

463.—CREAM TOAST

Cut six slices of bread in halves, toast slowly, or put into a moderate oven until light brown and crisp, dip each piece into Sauce for Cream Toast (see No. 464), and put into a covered serving dish; pour over remaining sauce, and cover for two or three minutes before serving.

464.—SAUCE FOR CREAM TOAST

2 cups milk ½ teaspoon salt
3 tablespoons flour 1 tablespoon butter
¼ cup cold water

Scald the milk; mix the flour to a smooth paste with water, add to milk and stir until thickened; cook over hot water fifteen minutes, stirring occasionally; add salt and butter, and pour over toast.[Pg 167]

465.—CHEESE TOAST

To recipe for Cream Toast (see No. 463) add one-half cup of either soft cheese cut fine or grated cheese.

466.—CINNAMON TOAST

Cut stale bread into thin slices, remove crusts, and cut in halves; toast evenly, and spread first with butter, then with honey, and dust with cinnamon. Serve very hot.

467.—FRENCH TOAST

1 egg slightly beaten ¾ cup milk or coffee
¼ teaspoon salt 4 slices bread
1 tablespoon sugar

Mix egg, salt, sugar, and liquid in a shallow dish; soak bread in mixture, and cook on a hot, greased griddle until brown, turning when half cooked. Serve plain or spread with jam.

468.—GOLDENROD HAM TOAST

Follow recipe for Cream Toast (see No. 463); to the sauce add one-half cup finely chopped ham and the finely chopped whites of two hard-cooked eggs. When toast is in the serving dish, sprinkle with the hard-cooked yolks rubbed through a sieve.

469.—SUNDAY TOAST

Cut whole wheat bread into four one-inch slices, remove crusts, butter, and cut bread into three strips; mix one-third cup of brown sugar, one teaspoon of cinnamon, two tablespoons of seeded and chopped raisins, and a tablespoon of milk; spread paste on bread, and bake in a hot oven until brown. Serve hot.[Pg 168]

470.—TOMATO CREAM TOAST WITH EGG

½ can tomato 1/3 cup cold water
1/3 teaspoon salt 2/3 cup hot milk
1/3 teaspoon soda 1 tablespoon butter
1 teaspoon sugar 2 hard-cooked eggs
4 tablespoons flour 6 slices toast

Simmer tomato for fifteen minutes and press through a sieve; add salt, soda, and sugar; heat to boiling point, and thicken with flour mixed to a smooth paste with cold water; cook five minutes, and add hot milk and butter. Dip toast in sauce, place on platter, cover with remaining sauce, and garnish with egg cut into eighths lengthwise.

471.—TO FRESHEN STALE LOAF BREAD, ROLLS, MUFFINS, OR DOUGHNUTS

Dip quickly into cold water, put in a paper bag, fold top of bag firmly, and place in a hot oven until heated through.

472.—BUTTERED CRUMBS

Melt two tablespoons of butter, stir in one-half cup of coarse, dried bread crumbs until butter is absorbed.

473.—CROUSTADES

Cut stale bread in slices about an inch and a half thick, remove crusts, and cut in rounds, squares, triangles, or any shape desired; remove the centers, using a small, sharp knife, and leaving a wall one-third of an inch thick; brush with melted butter, and brown in oven; or fry, inverted, in hot, deep fat.[Pg 169]

474.—CROUTONS

Cut stale bread in one-third-inch slices, cut slices into cubes, and brown in the oven or fry in deep fat. Cold toast may be used instead of bread.

475.—CRISP STICKS

Cut stale bread in half-inch slices, remove crusts, spread lightly with butter, cut in half-inch sticks, and put in slow oven until light brown and crisp.[Pg 170]


CHAPTER XXI

GRIDDLE CAKES, WAFFLES, AND SIRUPS

476.—PLAIN GRIDDLE CAKES

1½ cups flour 1 egg well beaten
3 teaspoons baking powder 1 tablespoon melted shortening
½ teaspoon salt ½ cup milk
1 tablespoon sugar ¾ cup water

Mix and sift dry ingredients; add egg well beaten, shortening, and liquid; beat well, and cook on a hot griddle. The cakes should be small and should be served very hot with butter and sirup.

477.—SOUR MILK GRIDDLE CAKES

2 cups flour 2 teaspoons sugar
½ teaspoon salt 2 cups thick sour milk
1 teaspoon soda 1 egg well beaten

Mix and sift dry ingredients, add milk and egg, and beat well; cook the same as Plain Griddle Cakes (see No. 476).

478.—CORN MEAL GRIDDLE CAKES

1½ cups corn meal 1 egg well beaten
½ cup flour ¾ cup milk
4 teaspoons baking powder ¾ cup water
¾ teaspoon salt 1 tablespoon melted shortening
1 tablespoon molasses

Mix in order given, beat well, and cook on a hot, greased griddle. If all of the batter is not needed at once, cover[Pg 171] what is left, and keep in a cold place; add one-half teaspoon of baking powder, and beat vigorously before using; or half of the recipe may be used and the extra half egg used in some other way.

479.—DRIED CRUMB GRIDDLE CAKES

1 cup dried and sifted bread crumbs 2 tablespoons sugar
1 cup flour 1 egg
½ teaspoon salt 1¼ cups milk
4 teaspoons baking powder

Mix and cook according to directions for Plain Griddle Cakes (see No. 476). Half milk and half water may be used.

480.—RICE GRIDDLE CAKES

1 cup cooked rice 2 teaspoons baking powder
1 egg well beaten 1 tablespoon sugar
1 cup milk ½ teaspoon salt
1 cup flour Few gratings nutmeg

Mix rice and egg thoroughly with a fork, add milk, and dry ingredients mixed and sifted together; beat well, and cook the same as Plain Griddle Cakes (see No. 476).

481.—RAISED BUCKWHEAT CAKES

1 cup boiling water ¼ cup lukewarm water
½ teaspoon salt 1 cup buckwheat flour
1 tablespoon molasses ¼ cup white flour
½ yeast cake ½ teaspoon soda

Mix boiling water, salt, and molasses, and when lukewarm add yeast dissolved in lukewarm water; add gradually to flour, and beat well; let rise over night, add soda, beat well, and cook the same as Plain Griddle Cakes (see No. 476).[Pg 172]

482.—WAFFLES

1½ cups flour 1 egg well beaten
½ teaspoon salt 1 cup milk
3 teaspoons baking powder 3 tablespoons melted shortening
1 teaspoon sugar

Mix and sift dry ingredients; add egg, milk, and shortening, and beat well; cook in a hot, well-greased waffle iron.

483.—CORN MEAL WAFFLES

Follow recipe for Oatmeal Waffles (see No. 484), using one cup of corn meal mush in place of oatmeal.

484.—OATMEAL WAFFLES

1 cup cooked oatmeal 2 teaspoons baking powder
Yolks of 2 eggs ½ teaspoon salt
1 cup milk 1 tablespoon sugar
2 tablespoons melted shortening Whites of two eggs
1 cup entire wheat flour

Mix oatmeal and yolks of eggs (which have been beaten very light) until there are no lumps in the mixture; add milk, shortening, and dry ingredients sifted together; beat well, and fold in the stiffly beaten whites of eggs. Cook in a hot, well-greased waffle iron.

485.—RICE WAFFLES

To recipe for Waffles (see No. 482) add one-half cup of cooked rice, mixing the rice thoroughly with the beaten egg before adding.

486.—BROWN SUGAR SIRUP

Boil one cup of brown sugar and one-half cup of water until the consistency of thick maple sirup. Serve hot or cold.[Pg 173]

487.—CIDER SIRUP

1½ cups cider 1 cup sugar

Heat cider, add sugar, and boil until a thick sirup is formed, skimming when necessary. Serve hot or cold.

488.—LEMON SIRUP

Boil one cup of sugar, one-half cup of water, and one tablespoon of lemon juice until the consistency of thick maple sirup; add one teaspoon of butter, and serve hot.

489.—ORANGE SIRUP

¾ cup orange juice Grated rind ½ orange
1 cup sugar

Boil orange juice and sugar until mixture has the consistency of thick maple sirup, add rind, and serve hot or cold.[Pg 174]


CHAPTER XXII

CAKES AND COOKIES[11]

490.—APPLE SAUCE CAKE (without Butter, Eggs, or Milk)

1 cup unsweetened apple sauce ¼ teaspoon salt
½ cup melted shortening 1 teaspoon cinnamon
1 cup sugar ½ teaspoon nutmeg
1 teaspoon soda ¼ teaspoon clove
2 cups flour 1 cup raisins seeded and chopped

Mix in order given, sifting dry ingredients together, beat well, pour into a deep pan, and bake about one hour in a slow oven.

491.—CANADA WAR CAKE (without Butter, Eggs, or Milk)

1 cup brown sugar 1 teaspoon cinnamon
¼ cup shortening ½ teaspoon mace
1 cup boiling water ¼ teaspoon clove
2 cups seeded raisins 1 teaspoon soda
½ teaspoon salt 2 cups flour

Mix sugar, shortening, water, raisins, and salt; boil five minutes; cool, and add spices, soda, and flour sifted together; beat well; pour into a greased, paper-lined bread pan, and bake in a slow oven one hour.[Pg 175]

492.—DATE CAKE

1/3 cup melted shortening 1¾ cups flour
1¼ cups brown sugar 3½ teaspoons baking powder
1 egg unbeaten ½ teaspoon mace
½ cup milk 1 cup dates stoned and chopped

Mix in order given, and beat vigorously for three or four minutes; bake in two layer-cake pans in a moderate oven for twenty-five minutes; when partly cool spread with tart jelly, and sprinkle top layer with powdered sugar.

493.—FUDGE CAKE

¼ cup shortening ½ cup milk
1 cup brown sugar 1½ cups flour
1 square chocolate 3 teaspoons baking powder
1 egg well beaten ¼ teaspoon salt

Cream shortening, add sugar, and beat well; add chocolate melted and egg; beat again; add milk; add flour, baking powder, and salt sifted together; beat for two minutes. Pour into two greased layer-cake pans, and bake in a moderate oven about eighteen minutes. Fill, and spread top with Fudge Filling (see No. 533).

494.—OLD-FASHIONED PORK CAKE

½ pound fat salt pork ¼ pound citron shredded
1 cup boiling water 1 nutmeg grated
1 cup molasses 2 teaspoons cinnamon
1 cup sugar ½ teaspoon cloves
2 eggs beaten ½ teaspoon allspice
½ pound raisins 1 teaspoon soda
½ pound currants 4 cups flour

Put pork through meat chopper, using finest cutter; add boiling water and let stand fifteen minutes; add molasses, sugar, eggs, and fruit, and mix well; add dry ingredients, which have been sifted together; beat well;[Pg 176] pour into two deep greased and paper-lined pans; and bake in a slow oven two hours. This cake keeps well if stored in a covered stone crock. It may be reheated in the top of double boiler, and served hot with pudding sauce.

495.—ONE-EGG CAKE

2 tablespoons butter 1½ cups flour
½ cup sugar 2½ teaspoons baking powder
1 egg Grated rind of 1 lemon
½ cup milk

Cream the butter, add the sugar and the well-beaten egg; beat thoroughly, add the other ingredients in the order given, and bake in a moderate oven about half an hour.

496.—ORANGE CAKE

¼ cup shortening 1½ cups flour
1 cup sugar 2½ teaspoons baking powder
1 egg Grated rind ½ orange
½ cup milk

Cream the shortening, add sugar and egg well beaten; add milk, flour, baking powder, and rind; beat well, and bake in two layer pans about twenty minutes in a moderate oven. Fill and cover top with Orange Icing (see No. 527).

497.—PLAIN CAKE

1/3 cup shortening 1-2/3 cups flour
1 cup sugar 3 teaspoons baking powder
2 eggs Few grains salt
½ cup milk ½ teaspoon lemon extract

Beat shortening and sugar until light and creamy; add eggs well beaten, flour, baking powder, salt, and extract; beat well, pour into a greased and papered cake pan, and bake about half an hour in a moderate oven, or in two[Pg 177] layer-cake pans about twenty minutes. This is an excellent foundation cake for use with various flavorings, icings, and fillings.

498.—SPICE CAKE (without Eggs)

1/3 cup shortening 1½ teaspoons cinnamon
1 cup sugar ¾ teaspoon nutmeg
1 cup sour milk ¼ teaspoon cloves
2 cups flour ¼ teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon soda 1 cup raisins seeded and chopped

Cream shortening and sugar, add sour milk; add dry ingredients sifted together; beat well; add raisins, pour into a greased shallow pan, and bake half an hour in a moderate oven. Dust with confectioners' sugar or cover with plain icing.

499.—WHITE CAKE

Whites of 2 eggs 3 teaspoons baking powder
Melted butter 7/8 cup sugar
Milk ½ teaspoon almond extract
1½ cups flour

Break the whites of eggs into a measuring cup; add melted butter to half fill cup; add milk to fill cup. Mix and sift flour, baking powder, and sugar; combine mixtures, add flavoring, and beat for five minutes. Bake in a shallow cake pan half an hour, or in muffin tins about twenty minutes, in a moderate oven.

500.—SPONGE CAKE (Hot Water)

Yolks of 2 eggs Whites of 2 eggs
¼ cup hot water 1 cup flour
7/8 cup sugar 2 teaspoons baking powder
Grated rind 1 lemon ¼ teaspoon salt

Beat the yolks of eggs until thick and light, add the water and sugar, and beat three minutes with the egg[Pg 178] beater; add the lemon rind and the whites stiffly beaten; sift flour, baking powder, and salt, and fold in carefully. Pour into a shallow greased pan, and bake in a moderate oven twenty-five minutes.

501.—VELVET SPONGE CAKE

2 eggs ½ cup pastry flour
1 cup sugar 2 teaspoons baking powder
1/8 teaspoon salt Grated rind 1 lemon
¼ cup potato flour 1/3 cup hot milk

Beat eggs until very light, add sugar gradually, and continue beating with the egg beater; mix and sift salt, flour, and baking powder; add half to the eggs and sugar, and beat well; add rest of flour, and beat again; add rind and milk, and beat hard; pour into a deep pan, and bake forty minutes in a slow oven.

502.—CREAM PIE

Follow rule for Jelly Roll Cake (see No. 503); bake in two layers, and fill with Cream Filling (see No. 531).

503.—CAKE FOR JELLY ROLL OR CHARLOTTE RUSSE

2 eggs 1 cup flour
1 cup powdered sugar 1½ teaspoons baking powder
1/3 cup hot water ¼ teaspoon salt

Beat the eggs very light, add sugar gradually, and continue beating; add water, flour, baking powder, and salt. Pour into a greased, paper-lined dripping pan and bake in a moderate oven about fifteen minutes. The cake should be about half an inch thick when baked. Trim off the edges, spread with jam or jelly, and roll firmly; wrap in[Pg 179] a paper napkin to keep in shape. For Charlotte Russe cut cake into pieces to fit paper cases, and fill with Charlotte Russe Mixture (see No. 562).

504.—CHOCOLATE MARSHMALLOW ROLL

To recipe for Jelly Roll (see No. 503) add two squares of melted chocolate. Bake as for jelly roll, trim edges, spread with Marshmallow Filling (see No. 534), and roll the same as jelly roll.

505.—HOT WATER GINGERBREAD (without Egg)

¼ cup shortening 1 teaspoon soda
1 cup dark molasses ½ teaspoon salt
½ cup boiling water 1½ teaspoons ginger
2 cups bread flour ½ teaspoon cinnamon

Mix shortening, molasses, and water; add dry ingredients sifted together, and beat well. Pour into greased muffin pans and bake in a moderate oven twenty minutes; or pour into a greased shallow pan and bake twenty-five minutes.

506.—HOT WATER GINGERBREAD (with Egg)

1/3 cup beef drippings 2¾ cups flour
2/3 cup boiling water 1 teaspoon soda
1 cup dark molasses ½ teaspoon salt
1 egg well beaten 1½ teaspoons ginger

Pour boiling water over shortening, add molasses and egg; mix and sift dry ingredients, add to first mixture, and beat well. Pour into a shallow, greased cake pan, and bake in a moderate oven twenty-five minutes.[Pg 180]

507.—SOUR MILK GINGERBREAD

2 cups flour 1 cup molasses
1½ teaspoons soda 1 cup thick sour milk
1 teaspoon ginger 1 egg well beaten
¼ teaspoon salt

Mix and sift dry ingredients, add molasses, milk, and egg, and beat well; pour into a greased pan, and bake in a moderate oven twenty-five minutes.

508.—GINGER APPLE CAKE

Follow any recipe for gingerbread, bake in two layers, and put Apple Filling (see No. 529) between layers and on top.

509.—GINGER GEMS

½ cup molasses 1½ cups flour
¼ cup brown sugar 1 teaspoon soda
¼ cup shortening 1 teaspoon ginger
½ cup boiling water ½ teaspoon cinnamon
1 beaten egg ¼ teaspoon salt

Mix in order given, sifting the dry ingredients together; beat well, pour into greased muffin tins, and bake in a moderate oven twenty minutes.

510.—BRAN DROP COOKIES

1 cup bran ¼ teaspoon clove
½ cup flour ¼ cup molasses
¼ teaspoon salt ¼ cup sugar
¼ teaspoon soda ¼ cup melted shortening
½ teaspoon cinnamon ¼ cup milk

Mix in order given, drop from tablespoon, two inches apart, on greased pan, and bake in a hot oven twelve minutes.[Pg 181]

511.—CHEESE DROPS

2 tablespoons butter 1/8 teaspoon paprika
¼ cup grated cheese 1/8 teaspoon mustard
¼ cup dried and sifted crumbs Few grains cayenne
¼ teaspoon salt Whites of 2 eggs

Cream butter and cheese together; mix crumbs with seasonings and add to cheese; fold in the stiffly beaten whites of eggs. Drop from a teaspoon on a greased baking sheet about two inches apart, and bake in a moderate oven about twelve minutes. Serve with soup or salad.

512.—CHEESE WAFERS

1 cup flour 1 tablespoon shortening
¼ teaspoon salt ½ cup grated cheese
½ teaspoon paprika ¼ cup cold water

Mix and sift flour, salt, and paprika; rub in shortening with finger tips; add cheese and mix to a stiff paste with cold water; roll out very thin, cut with a small round cutter, place on a greased baking sheet, and bake in a moderate oven five or six minutes. Serve with salad or soup.

513.—CHOCOLATE COOKIES

2 squares chocolate 2 cups flour
½ cup shortening 2½ teaspoons baking powder
1 cup brown sugar ½ teaspoon salt
1 egg well beaten ½ teaspoon cinnamon
¼ cup milk

Put chocolate with shortening in mixing bowl and place over hot water until melted; add other ingredients in order given. Chill, roll thin, and cut with fancy cutter. Bake in a moderate oven about ten minutes.[Pg 182]

514.—GINGER WAFERS

½ cup shortening ¼ teaspoon salt
1 cup brown sugar 1¼ teaspoons ginger
2¼ cups bread flour ½ cup milk
½ teaspoon soda

Cream shortening and sugar; sift soda, salt, and ginger with flour, and add alternately with milk; chill; roll thin on baking sheet; mark in squares, and bake in a moderate oven eight or ten minutes. Remove from pan while warm.

515.—MARSHMALLOW WAFERS

Arrange thin crackers or wafers on a baking sheet, place a marshmallow on each one, and bake in a moderate oven for a few minutes until marshmallows melt; into each one press half a nut meat, raisin, cherry, or a bit of candied fruit.

516.—MOLASSES BROWNIES

1/3 cup shortening 1 beaten egg
1/3 cup sugar ½ teaspoon baking powder
1/3 cup molasses 1 cup flour
2 squares melted chocolate ¾ cup chopped nut meats

Cream the shortening, add other ingredients in order given, drop from spoon on greased pan, and bake about twelve minutes in a moderate oven.

517.—OATMEAL MACAROONS

1 egg 1 cup rolled oats
½ cup sugar 1/3 cup shredded coconut
1 tablespoon melted butter ½ teaspoon salt

Beat egg until light, add other ingredients in order given, beat well, and drop from spoon on greased pan; bake about fifteen minutes in a moderate oven.[Pg 183]

518.—PEANUT MACAROONS

White of 1 egg 1 cup powdered sugar
1/8 teaspoon salt 1 cup finely chopped peanuts

Add salt to the egg, and beat until stiff; add sugar and nuts, and mix well; drop from a teaspoon on a greased baking sheet two inches apart, and bake in a slow oven about fifteen minutes.

519.—RAISIN DROP COOKIES

3 tablespoons shortening 1 cup flour
½ cup brown sugar 2 teaspoons baking powder
1 egg well beaten 1 teaspoon cinnamon
2 tablespoons milk ½ cup raisins seeded and chopped

Cream the shortening and sugar; add egg and milk, and beat well; add flour, baking powder, and cinnamon sifted together; add raisins; beat well, drop from a teaspoon two inches apart on a greased baking sheet, and bake in a moderate oven about twelve minutes.

520.—WALNUT WAFERS

2 eggs ¼ teaspoon salt
1 cup brown sugar ¼ teaspoon baking powder
½ cup flour ¾ cup chopped nut meats
¼ teaspoon cinnamon

Beat eggs until light; add sugar, and beat well; add dry ingredients sifted together; beat well, add nuts, pour into a greased dripping pan, and bake in a moderate oven about ten minutes. Cut in squares while hot. Mixture may be baked in tiny scalloped tins if preferred.

[Pg 184]


CHAPTER XXIII

ICINGS AND FILLINGS

521.—BOILED ICING[12]

1/3 cup boiling water White of 1 egg
1 cup sugar 1 teaspoon vanilla
1/8 teaspoon cream of tartar

Boil water and sugar to 240° F., or until the sirup forms soft ball when tried in cold water; add cream of tartar and vanilla, and pour slowly upon the stiffly beaten white of egg, beating constantly until thick enough to spread without running. For caramel flavor melt one-third of the sugar first.

522.—CARAMEL ICING

1 cup brown sugar 1 teaspoon butter
1/3 cup milk Few grains salt

Put ingredients in saucepan, and boil to 240° F., or until a soft ball can be formed when tested in cold water. Beat until creamy, and spread while warm. Chopped nut meats may be added.

523.—CHOCOLATE ICING

2 squares chocolate Confectioners' sugar
¼ cup boiling water ½ teaspoon vanilla

Melt chocolate, add boiling water, and mix well; add confectioners' sugar until of right consistency to spread; add vanilla and beat well. Coffee may be used in place of water.[Pg 185]

524.—COCOA ICING

1 tablespoon butter 2 tablespoons cocoa
2 tablespoons milk Confectioners' sugar

Heat butter and milk in a saucepan, remove from fire, add cocoa, and enough confectioners' sugar to thicken. About one cup of sugar will be required.

525.—COFFEE ICING

Follow directions for Boiled Icing (see No. 521), using strong coffee in place of water. Or to recipe for Quick Icing (see No. 528) or Cream Icing (see No. 526) add one teaspoon of instantaneous coffee.

526.—CREAM ICING

1¼ cups confectioners' sugar ¼ teaspoon vanilla
Heavy cream

Sift sugar and add cream until of right consistency to spread (about two tablespoons); add flavoring, and beat well.

527.—ORANGE ICING

Juice of ½ orange Confectioners' sugar
Grated rind of ¼ orange

Mix sugar with orange juice and rind until icing is firm enough to spread.

528.—QUICK ICING

1 tablespoon butter Confectioners' sugar
2 tablespoons boiling water ¼ teaspoon flavoring

Pour boiling water over butter; stir in sugar enough to thicken; add extract, and beat well before spreading. (A little more than one cup of sugar will usually be required.)[Pg 186]

529.—APPLE FILLING

3 baked apples 1 cup confectioners' sugar
White of 1 egg

Press apples through a sieve; beat white of egg until stiff; add half of sugar, and beat well; add apple and remaining sugar gradually, and beat until very light. Spread between layers and on top of cake. Two tablespoons of tart jelly may be beaten with the apple.

530.—COFFEE CREAM FILLING

Follow recipe for Cream Filling (see No. 531), but use one-half cup strong coffee in place of one-half cup of milk. Or add one teaspoon of instantaneous coffee to the recipe.

531.—CREAM FILLING

1½ cups milk 1/8 teaspoon salt
1 cup sugar 1 egg slightly beaten
¼ cup cornstarch 1 teaspoon flavoring

Scald milk, mix sugar, cornstarch, salt, and egg; add to milk, and cook over hot water, stirring constantly until mixture thickens; cook fifteen minutes, stirring occasionally. Cool and flavor before spreading.

532.—DATE AND FIG FILLING

1 cup figs ½ cup boiling water
1 cup dates Juice ½ lemon
½ cup sugar

Wash, dry, and chop figs; wash, dry, stone, and chop dates; mix fruit with sugar, water, and lemon juice, and cook over hot water until thick enough to spread.[Pg 187]

533.—FUDGE FILLING

1½ cups brown sugar 1/3 cup milk
1 tablespoon butter Few grains salt
1 square chocolate ½ cup nut meats chopped

Put sugar, butter, chocolate, milk, and salt in a saucepan; heat slowly to boiling point, and boil to 240° F., or until a soft ball can be formed when tested in cold water; remove from fire, add nuts, and beat until smooth and creamy.

534.—MARSHMALLOW FILLING

1 cup sugar ½ pound marshmallows
1/3 cup boiling water 1 teaspoon vanilla

Boil sugar and water to 240° F., or until a soft ball can be formed when tested in cold water; soften marshmallows over hot water, add sirup, and when partly cooled add vanilla and beat until stiff enough to spread. Chopped nuts, dates, figs, raisins, or candied fruits may be added.

535.—MOCHA FILLING

2 tablespoons hot black coffee ½ teaspoon vanilla
1 tablespoon butter 1 cup confectioners' sugar
2 tablespoons cocoa

Mix coffee, butter, cocoa, and vanilla, and add sugar enough for mixture to spread without running.

536.—ORANGE FILLING

½ cup sugar ½ cup orange juice
3 tablespoons flour 1 beaten egg
Grated rind ½ orange 1 teaspoon butter

Mix sugar, flour, and rind in the top of double boiler, add orange juice, egg, and butter, and cook over hot water for twelve minutes, stirring often.[Pg 188]

537.—PRUNE FILLING

To recipe for Boiled Icing (see No. 521) add two-thirds of a cup of cooked prunes which have been stoned and cut in small pieces, and the chopped meats from six of the prune stones. Spread between layers of cake.

[Pg 189]


CHAPTER XXIV

HOT DESSERTS

538.—APPLE ROULETTES

Use recipe for Baking Powder Biscuit (see No. 424); roll dough very thin, brush with melted butter, and spread with one cup of chopped apple, mixed with one-fourth cup of sugar, and one teaspoon of cinnamon; roll firmly like a jelly roll, cut in three-fourths-inch slices, place in buttered pan, and bake in a hot oven fifteen minutes. Serve with hot liquid sauce.

539.—DUTCH APPLE CAKE

1½ cups flour ½ cup milk
3 teaspoons baking powder 2 tablespoons melted shortening
½ teaspoon salt 3 apples
3 tablespoons sugar 2 tablespoons sugar
1 egg ¼ teaspoon cinnamon

Sift together flour, baking powder, salt, and sugar; add egg well beaten, milk, and shortening; beat well, and spread in a greased pan, having mixture about an inch deep; core, pare, and quarter apples, cut in thick slices, and arrange in rows on top of cake; sprinkle with sugar and cinnamon, and bake in hot oven half an hour. Serve with liquid sauce.[Pg 190]

540.—STEAMED APPLE PUDDING

6 apples 3 teaspoons baking powder
½ cup sugar ½ teaspoon salt
½ teaspoon nutmeg 2 tablespoons shortening
1½ cups flour ¾ cup milk

Pare, core, and slice apples; place in a greased pudding dish, and sprinkle with sugar and nutmeg mixed. Sift flour, baking powder, and salt; rub in shortening with finger tips, and mix with milk; spread over apples, and steam for one hour. Turn out of dish, and serve with apples on top. Serve with Soft Sauce (see No. 617).

541.—BANANA TOAST

Mash and sweeten bananas, heap on rounds of buttered toast, and heat in oven. Serve hot with cream or rich milk. Garnish with split cherries, nuts, or bits of jelly.

542.—BLACKBERRY PUDDING

Add one cup of blackberries to recipe for Cottage Pudding (see No. 549) and serve with Blackberry Sauce (see No. 618).

543.—BLUEBERRY PUDDING

To recipe for Cottage Pudding (see No. 549) add one cup of blueberries.

544.—BROWN BETTY

2 cups soft bread crumbs ¼ teaspoon clove
4 tablespoons butter ¼ teaspoon nutmeg
4 apples 2 tablespoons molasses
1/3 cup brown sugar 2 tablespoons hot water
½ teaspoon cinnamon ¼ teaspoon salt

Mix crumbs with melted butter; pare, core, and slice apples; mix sugar and spices; arrange crumbs and apple[Pg 191] in layers in a greased baking dish, sprinkle each layer with sugar; mix molasses, water, and salt, and pour over all. Bake slowly for an hour and a half.

545.—BAKED CRANBERRY PUDDING

2 cups soft bread crumbs 1 cup sugar
¼ cup butter ½ cup sultana raisins
1 cup chopped cranberries ¼ cup boiling water

Mix crumbs with melted butter; add cranberries, sugar, and raisins, and put into a greased baking dish; add water, and bake in a slow oven one hour. Serve with Soft Sauce (see No. 617).

546.—BAKED INDIAN PUDDING

2 cups boiling water 3 cups hot milk
1 teaspoon salt ¼ cup molasses
5 tablespoons fine corn meal ½ teaspoon ginger

Add salt to boiling water, sift in corn meal very slowly, and boil ten minutes, stirring often; add milk, molasses, and ginger, pour into a greased earthen dish, and bake very slowly for three hours. Serve with rich milk, cream, or Ginger Sauce (see No. 611).

547.—CARAMEL TOAST PUDDING

¾ cup sugar ¼ teaspoon salt
2 slices toast ½ teaspoon nutmeg
2 cups hot milk 1 egg
1 tablespoon butter

Caramelize sugar; cut each slice of toast in quarters, dip in caramel, and arrange in baking dish; add milk to caramel remaining in pan, and stir until dissolved;[Pg 192] add butter, salt, nutmeg, and egg slightly beaten; pour over toast, and bake in slow oven about half an hour. Serve with cream, rich milk, or liquid sauce.

548.—STEAMED CHOCOLATE PUDDING

½ cup sugar 1 cup flour
1 tablespoon melted butter 1½ teaspoons baking powder
1 beaten egg ½ teaspoon cinnamon
½ cup milk 1 square melted chocolate
1/8 teaspoon salt

Mix in order given, put in pudding mold, cover closely, and steam one hour. Serve with cream or Soft Sauce (see No. 617).

549.—COTTAGE PUDDING

¼ cup shortening 2 cups flour
½ cup sugar 4 teaspoons baking powder
1 egg ¼ teaspoon salt
¾ cup milk

Cream the butter; add the sugar and the well-beaten egg, and beat well; add the milk and then the flour, baking powder, and salt, which have been sifted together; beat again, and bake in hot oven in pudding dish about half an hour, or in individual tins about twenty minutes. Serve with hot liquid sauce.

550.—STEAMED FIG PUDDING

½ cup shortening 1 teaspoon cinnamon
½ cup sugar ½ teaspoon nutmeg
1 egg well beaten ½ teaspoon salt
1 cup milk 1 pound figs chopped
½ cup molasses ¼ cup currants
2½ cups flour ½ cup flour
5 teaspoons baking powder

Mix shortening and sugar, and beat until creamy; add egg, milk, and molasses, add two and a half cups of flour[Pg 193] sifted with baking powder, spices, and salt; beat well; add figs and currants mixed with one-half cup of flour. Pour into a greased mold, and steam three hours, or pour into greased one-pound baking powder boxes, and steam an hour and three-quarters. Serve with Cranberry Sauce (see No. 606) or Currant Jelly Sauce (see No. 608). This pudding keeps well and can be reheated in the top of the double boiler.

551.—STEAMED FRUIT PUDDING

1 egg well beaten ½ teaspoon salt
1 cup molasses 1 teaspoon cinnamon
½ cup water ¼ teaspoon clove
2 tablespoons melted shortening ½ teaspoon mace
1½ cups flour ¾ cup raisins seeded and chopped
½ teaspoon soda ¼ cup currants

Mix egg, molasses, water, and shortening; add dry ingredients sifted together; add fruit; mix well, pour into greased one-pound baking powder boxes, and steam an hour and three-quarters. Serve with a tart sauce. One cup of dates, stoned and cut in pieces, may be used instead of raisins and currants.

552.—MOCK INDIAN PUDDING

2 slices bread buttered 1/3 cup sugar
2 cups milk ¼ teaspoon cinnamon
½ cup molasses ¼ teaspoon salt

Butter two slices bread cut three-quarters of an inch thick, put into buttered baking dish, and pour over the bread the rest of the ingredients mixed together. Bake one and a half hours in a slow oven.[Pg 194]

553.—INDIAN TAPIOCA PUDDING

1/3 cup pearl tapioca ½ cup molasses
2 cups boiling water 1 tablespoon butter
1½ teaspoons salt ¼ teaspoon cinnamon
¼ cup corn meal 3 cups hot milk

Soak tapioca in cold water for one hour, and drain; add salt to boiling water, sift in corn meal, and boil ten minutes, stirring often; add tapioca and other ingredients, pour into a greased earthen dish, and bake slowly for two hours.

554.—PEACH DUMPLINGS

Cover halves of preserved peaches with Shortcake Dough (see No. 441) rolled thin; bake in hot oven, and serve with hot peach sirup and hard sauce.

555.—BAKED RICE CUSTARD

1 cup cooked rice Pinch of salt
2 eggs 1½ cups milk
1/3 cup sugar ½ teaspoon lemon extract

Mix in order given and bake about twenty minutes in a moderate oven. Serve hot or cold with cream or rich milk.

556.—BAKED RICE PUDDING

½ cup rice ½ teaspoon salt
2 cups milk ½ nutmeg grated
2 cups boiling water 1 cup raisins seeded and chopped
¼ cup sugar

Wash rice, mix with other ingredients, pour into a greased baking dish, and bake slowly for three hours. Stir occasionally during first hour of baking to prevent[Pg 195] rice and fruit from settling. Serve with rich milk or cream.

557.—MULLED RICE

½ cup rice ¼ teaspoon salt
2 cups hot milk 1 egg
1 tablespoon butter ½ teaspoon nutmeg
2 tablespoons sugar 2 tablespoons grape juice

Wash rice, and cook with milk, butter, sugar, and salt in double boiler until tender; beat egg, add nutmeg and grape juice, stir into rice, and cook five minutes. Serve with cream or rich milk.[Pg 196]


CHAPTER XXV

COLD DESSERTS

558.—BANANA ROYAL

4 bananas ¼ cup powdered sugar
¼ cup currant jelly 4 slices of French Toast (see No. 467) or stale sponge cake

Force bananas and jelly through potato ricer or a sieve, add sugar, and heap on French toast or sponge cake. Or line individual glasses with lady fingers and fill with banana mixture.

559.—BANANA WHIP

4 bananas 4 tablespoons powdered sugar
4 tablespoons grape juice or jelly Whites of 2 eggs

Peel and scrape bananas, force through a sieve; add grape juice, sugar, and stiffly beaten whites of eggs; pile lightly in individual glass dishes, garnish with bits of jelly, and serve at once. All materials should be very cold.

560.—BANANA AND GRAPE JUICE JELLY

½ box gelatine ¼ cup strained lemon juice
½ cup grape juice ¾ cup sugar
2½ cups boiling water 2 large bananas

Soak gelatine in grape juice five minutes; dissolve in boiling water, add lemon juice and sugar. When jelly begins to stiffen, beat with egg beater, and add the bananas pressed through a sieve.[Pg 197]

561.—BLACKBERRY MOLD

1 quart blackberries 2 cups water
½ cup sugar ¾ cup farina
¼ teaspoon salt

Heat berries, sugar, salt, and water, and when boiling add farina slowly. Cook over hot water half an hour, turn into a mold, and serve cold with cream. Blueberries, either fresh or canned, may be used in place of blackberries.

562.—CHARLOTTE RUSSE FILLING

1½ cups thin cream ¼ cup hot milk
1½ teaspoons gelatine 3 tablespoons powdered sugar
2 tablespoons cold milk ½ teaspoon vanilla

Whip the cream with a whip churn; skim off the froth as it rises, and place in a fine sieve to drain; soak gelatine in cold milk, dissolve in hot milk, add sugar and flavoring. Stir occasionally until mixture begins to stiffen; then fold in the whip from the cream.

563.—CHOCOLATE BLANCMANGE

2 cups hot milk ¼ cup sugar
4 tablespoons cornstarch 1½ squares chocolate melted
¼ teaspoon salt Whites 2 eggs
¼ teaspoon cinnamon

Scald milk; mix cornstarch, salt, cinnamon, and sugar; add slowly to milk, and cook over hot water until thickened, stirring constantly; add chocolate and cook for fifteen minutes, stirring occasionally; fold in the stiffly beaten whites of eggs, and turn into individual molds to chill.[Pg 198]

564.—COCONUT AND ORANGE JELLY

½ box gelatine 1/3 cup sugar
½ cup cold water 1 can coconut
1 cup hot milk Cold milk
¼ cup orange marmalade

Soak gelatine in cold water for five minutes; dissolve in hot milk; add marmalade and sugar; drain one can of coconut, and add to coconut milk enough cold milk to make one and a half cups; mix with jelly, add coconut, and pour into a mold to chill.

565.—COFFEE CARAMEL CUSTARDS

½ cup sugar 2 eggs
1 cup milk Few grains salt
1 cup strong coffee

Put sugar in smooth saucepan, and stir over fire until a light-colored caramel is formed. (Avoid burning.) Heat milk and coffee, add to caramel, and keep over hot water until caramel is dissolved; add eggs slightly beaten and salt; strain into cups, and bake in slow oven until firm.

566.—COFFEE JUNKET

2 cups lukewarm milk Few grains salt
¼ cup sugar ½ junket tablet
1 teaspoon instantaneous coffee 1 teaspoon cold water

Mix milk, sugar, coffee, and salt; stir until sugar is dissolved; dissolve junket tablet in cold water, add to milk, and pour into glasses. If milk is overheated junket will not be firm.[Pg 199]

567.—CRANBERRY WHIP

Follow recipe for Prune Whip (see No. 574), using one cup of strained cranberry sauce instead of prunes.

568.—SOFT CUSTARD

2 cups milk Few grains salt
Yolks of 2 eggs 1 teaspoon cornstarch
¼ cup sugar ½ teaspoon vanilla

Scald the milk; mix sugar, salt, and cornstarch, add to beaten egg yolks, and stir into the hot milk; cook over hot water ten minutes, stirring constantly until thickened; beat with egg beater; strain, cool, and add vanilla. To vary the flavor, the sugar may be caramelized, or other extracts may be used. Serve in glasses with a meringue made of the whites of eggs beaten stiff and sweetened with two tablespoons of sugar. Garnish with dots of red jelly.

569.—COFFEE AND RICE JELLY

½ box gelatine 1 cup milk
½ cup cold coffee ¾ cup sugar
2 cups hot strong coffee 1 cup cooked rice

Soak gelatine in cold coffee five minutes; add hot coffee and stir until dissolved; add milk and sugar; chill, and, when beginning to stiffen, beat with egg beater, add rice, and turn into a mold.

570.—FRUIT CREAM

2 bananas 1 tablespoon granulated gelatine
1 orange ¼ cup boiling water
½ lemon 1 cup cream whipped
1/3 cup powdered sugar

Press bananas through a sieve; add juice and pulp of orange, juice of lemon, sugar, and gelatine which has[Pg 200] been dissolved in hot water. Stir over ice water until mixture begins to stiffen, then fold in the cream. Put in mold and chill.

571.—SPICED FRUIT JELLY

6 apples 1 tablespoon gelatine
½ cup cranberries ¼ cup cold water
¾ cup boiling water ½ teaspoon cinnamon
1 cup sugar ¼ teaspoon clove

Core and slice apples, and cook with cranberries and boiling water fifteen minutes; press through a sieve, add sugar, gelatine dissolved in cold water, and spice. Stir until sugar is dissolved, pour into a mold, and put in a cool place until firm.

572.—FRUIT WHIP (Uncooked)

4 tart apples grated 2 tablespoons fruit jelly
4 figs chopped Whites of 2 eggs
8 dates stoned and chopped

Mix fruit; mash jelly with a fork; add to fruit, and fold in the stiffly beaten whites of eggs. Serve in glasses, and garnish with bits of jelly.

573.—PINEAPPLE PUDDING

Follow recipe for Chocolate Blancmange (see No. 563), omitting chocolate and cinnamon, and adding one-half can of grated pineapple.

574.—PRUNE WHIP

Press cooked and stoned prunes through a sieve; to one cup of prune pulp add two tablespoons of sugar; beat the[Pg 201] whites of two eggs very stiff; add prune mixture gradually, and beat well with a strong egg beater; when light turn into a small greased baking dish or into four individual dishes, and bake in a slow oven about twenty minutes, or until firm. Serve plain or with a custard sauce made from the yolks of the eggs.

575.—PRUNE AND WHEAT MOLD

1 cup prunes ¼ teaspoon salt
Boiling water ½ cup Cream of Wheat

Wash prunes, soak over night; cook in same water until tender, and remove the stones; measure prunes and juice, and add boiling water to make one quart; add salt; slowly sift in wheat, and cook over hot water for half an hour, stirring often at first; turn into a mold to cool.

576.—JELLIED PRUNES AND CRANBERRIES

1 cup prunes 1 cup sugar
Boiling water ½ box gelatine
1 cup cranberries chopped ½ cup cold water

Wash prunes, and soak over night in water to cover; cook until soft in same water; drain, measure juice, and add enough boiling water to make three cups; put cranberries in a colander and rinse off the seeds with running water; drain, and add to water; add sugar, and cook ten minutes; add the gelatine soaked in cold water; stone the prunes, cut in quarters, and add to cranberries; turn into a mold, and chill.[Pg 202]

577.—RICE MOLD

1 cup rice Grated rind of ½ orange
2 quarts boiling water ¾ cup powdered sugar
1 tablespoon salt 2 tablespoons grape juice
Juice of 1 orange

Cook rice in boiling salted water until tender; drain; mix with orange, sugar, and grape juice; press into a mold, and chill; turn out of mold, and serve with cream.

578.—SEA MOSS BLANCMANGE

¼ cup sea moss ¼ teaspoon salt
1 quart milk 1 teaspoon vanilla
¼ cup sugar

Soak moss in lukewarm water for ten minutes; lift carefully from the water so as not to disturb any sand which may have settled; rinse moss, drain well, add to hot milk, and cook in double boiler for half an hour. Strain through a fine sieve, add sugar, salt, and vanilla, and turn into a mold until firm. Serve with crushed berries, sliced bananas, or stewed fruit.[Pg 203]


CHAPTER XXVI

FROZEN DESSERTS

579.—TO FREEZE ICES

Use one measure of freezing salt to three measures of finely cracked ice for ice cream, sherbet, and all mixtures which are to be churned. Freeze slowly, remove dasher, pack solidly, add fresh salt and ice, and let stand for an hour before serving. To freeze mousse, bombe, and all unchurned mixtures, pack in equal parts of salt and ice, and let stand three hours.

580.—FROZEN CUSTARD

1 quart milk 2 teaspoons cornstarch
2 eggs 1 tablespoon vanilla
1 cup sugar Few grains salt

Scald milk; beat eggs slightly, add sugar mixed with cornstarch, and stir into milk; cook over hot water for twelve minutes, stirring constantly at first. Cool, add vanilla and salt, and freeze. Part cream may be used to advantage, or one can of evaporated milk with enough fresh milk added to make one quart.

581.—CHOCOLATE ICE CREAM

Follow recipe for Vanilla Ice Cream (see No. 589), adding two and a half squares of chocolate to the custard before cooking.[Pg 204]

582.—COCOA ICE CREAM

1 pint milk 1 teaspoon cornstarch
2 inches stick cinnamon 1 egg beaten
1 cup sugar 1 pint cream
½ cup cocoa 1 teaspoon vanilla
Few grains salt

Scald milk with cinnamon; mix sugar, cocoa, salt, cornstarch, and egg, and cook with milk until slightly thickened; cool, remove cinnamon, add cream and vanilla, and freeze.

583.—COFFEE ICE CREAM

1 can evaporated milk ½ cup sugar
1 cup boiling water 2 teaspoons instantaneous coffee

Add boiling water to milk, and cool; add sugar and flavoring, and freeze. Serve in glasses and garnish with whipped cream.

584.—MINT ICE CREAM

1 quart thin cream White of 1 egg
½ pound mint stick candy

Put half of cream in double boiler with candy, and heat until candy is dissolved. Cool, add the remainder of cream whipped, and the white of egg beaten stiff; freeze; and serve in glasses garnished with small green mint candies.

585.—ORANGE VELVET CREAM

1 cup sugar 1 cup orange juice
1 cup water Juice of 1 lemon
Whites of 2 eggs 1 pint cream whipped

Boil sugar and water until it threads; cool slightly and add gradually to the stiffly beaten whites of eggs, beating[Pg 205] steadily for three minutes; add fruit juice, and when cool fold in cream. Freeze, and serve in glasses garnished with candied orange peel and a few mint leaves.

586.—PHILADELPHIA ICE CREAM

1 quart thin cream Few grains salt
¾ cup sugar 1 tablespoon flavoring

Mix and freeze.

587.—PRUNE ICE CREAM

1½ cups hot milk 1 cup cream
2 eggs slightly beaten 2 cups cooked prunes
½ cup brown sugar

Cook milk, eggs, and sugar over hot water until thickened, stirring constantly; when cool add cream, prunes stoned and pressed through a sieve, and freeze. Undiluted, unsweetened, evaporated milk may be used in place of cream.

588.—STRAWBERRY ICE CREAM

1 quart strawberries 1 quart thin cream
1½ cups sugar

Mash strawberries, add sugar, let stand an hour, and press through a sieve; add cream, and freeze.

589.—VANILLA ICE CREAM

1 pint milk Few grains salt
1 cup sugar 1 pint cream
2 eggs 1 tablespoon vanilla

Scald milk, add sugar, salt, and eggs slightly beaten; cook over hot water until mixture coats spoon; cool; add cream and vanilla, and freeze.[Pg 206]

590.—CANTON GINGER SHERBET

½ cup Canton ginger Juice of 1 orange
1 cup sugar Juice of ½ lemon
3½ cups boiling water White of 1 egg

Put ginger through the food chopper, using finest cutter; add sugar and water, and boil fifteen minutes; add fruit juice; cool, and freeze. When nearly frozen, add the stiffly beaten white of egg.

591.—CIDER FRAPPÉ

1 quart sweet cider Juice of 3 oranges
1 cup sugar Juice of 1 lemon

Mix cider, sugar, and strained fruit juice; freeze to a mush, and serve in frappé glasses with the roast.

592.—CRANBERRY AND RAISIN SHERBET

3 cups cranberries 1½ cups sugar
1 cup seeded raisins White of 1 egg
1½ cups water

Cook cranberries, raisins, and water ten minutes; press through a sieve, add sugar, and freeze; when nearly frozen add the stiffly beaten white of egg, and continue freezing until stiff and smooth.

593.—FRUIT SHERBET

1 cup sugar Juice of 1 orange
1 cup water Juice of 1 lemon
1 teaspoon gelatine ¾ cup grated pineapple
2 tablespoons cold water 1 banana peeled and mashed

Boil sugar and water five minutes, add gelatine soaked in cold water, and stir until dissolved; add fruit; cool, and freeze.[Pg 207]

594.—GRAPE BOMBE

Line a mold with Grape Sherbet (see No. 595), fill with Charlotte Russe Filling (see No. 562) to within one inch of top, cover with sherbet, and pack in salt and ice for three hours.

595.—GRAPE SHERBET

1 cup sugar 2 tablespoons water
1 cup water 1 cup grape juice
1 teaspoon gelatine Juice of 1 lemon

Boil sugar and water five minutes; soak gelatine in cold water five minutes and add to sirup; add fruit juice, cool, and freeze. Serve in glasses with or without whipped cream garnish.

596.—JELLY SHERBET

1 teaspoon gelatine 1½ cups boiling water
½ cup cold water White of 1 egg
2 glasses jelly

Put gelatine and cold water in the top of double boiler; let stand five minutes; add jelly and boiling water, and stir until jelly is dissolved; when cool, freeze; when nearly frozen add the stiffly beaten white of egg. This is economical if home made jelly can be used.

597.—PINEAPPLE SHERBET

2/3 cup sugar Juice of 1 lemon
2 cups boiling water White of 1 egg
½ can grated pineapple

Boil sugar and water for fifteen minutes, add pineapple, and lemon juice; when cool, freeze; when nearly frozen add the stiffly beaten white of egg, and finish freezing.[Pg 208]

598.—SOMERSET SHERBET

1 banana 1 cup sugar
½ can apricots, or 1 teaspoon gelatine
1½ cups stewed dried apricots ¼ cup cold water
1 lemon 1 cup boiling water
1 orange

Press banana and apricots, with their juice, through a sieve; add juice of lemon and orange, and sugar; soak gelatine in cold water, dissolve in boiling water, add to fruit, cool, and freeze.

599.—STRAWBERRY SHERBET

2 cups water 1 box strawberries
1 cup sugar White of 1 egg

Boil sugar and water five minutes; mash berries, add to sirup, cool, and freeze; when nearly frozen add the stiffly beaten white of egg. If preferred, strain before freezing.

600.—FROZEN WATERMELON

Scoop out the inside of a watermelon with a large spoon; put in the freezer without the dasher, sprinkle with powdered sugar and lemon juice, and pack in equal parts of salt and ice for three hours.[Pg 209]


CHAPTER XXVII

SAUCES FOR DESSERTS

601.—CARAMEL SAUCE

Melt one cup of sugar in a smooth, clean saucepan, add three-fourths cup of boiling water, and simmer fifteen minutes. Take care that sugar does not burn. Strong coffee may be used instead of water, and, if desired, one-half cup of chopped nut meats may be added.

602.—CHOCOLATE SAUCE (Hot)

¾ cup sugar 2 teaspoons boiling water
1/3 cup boiling water 1 teaspoon butter
1/8 teaspoon salt ½ teaspoon vanilla
1 square chocolate

Cook sugar, one-third cup water, salt, and chocolate until sirup threads; remove from fire, add two teaspoons water, butter, and vanilla.

603.—CHOCOLATE MARSHMALLOW SAUCE

1 square chocolate ¼ cup sugar
½ tablespoon butter 1 cup boiling water
1 tablespoon flour 8 marshmallows cut in pieces
Few grains salt ½ teaspoon vanilla

Melt chocolate; add butter, flour, salt, sugar, and mix well; add water and boil two minutes; add marshmallows and beat well; add vanilla and serve hot. One tablespoon of shredded almonds may be added; or the marshmallows may be omitted and two tablespoons each of chopped nuts and raisins added.[Pg 210]

604.—CINNAMON SAUCE

Use recipe for Lemon Sauce (see No. 613); but omit the lemon flavoring, and add one teaspoon cinnamon and one tablespoon of molasses.

605.—COFFEE SAUCE (Evaporated Milk)

1 cup evaporated milk 1 teaspoon soluble coffee, or
¼ cup sugar 2 tablespoons clear black coffee

Place milk on ice for a few hours; beat with a rotary egg beater until stiff, add sugar and flavoring.

606.—CRANBERRY SAUCE (Pudding)

¼ cup butter 2 tablespoons boiling water
1 cup powdered sugar ½ cup strained cranberry sauce

Cream butter, add sugar and water gradually and alternately; beat well, and add cranberry sauce. The stiffly beaten white of one egg may be added. Serve with cottage or steamed puddings.

607.—CUSTARD SAUCE

Make the same as Soft Custard (see No. 568).

608.—CURRANT JELLY SAUCE (Pudding)

1 tablespoon cornstarch 2 tablespoons currant jelly
¼ cup sugar 1 teaspoon butter
1 cup boiling water Juice of ½ lemon

Mix cornstarch and sugar in a saucepan, add water gradually, when thickened add jelly, simmer ten minutes; add butter and lemon juice just before serving.[Pg 211]

609.—DATE SAUCE

To Lemon Sauce (see No. 613) add eight dates, which have been washed, stoned, and cut in small pieces. Serve with Cottage Pudding (see No. 549).

610.—FRUIT SAUCE

Heat one cup of sirup of preserved or canned fruit, thicken with one teaspoon of cornstarch moistened with one tablespoon of cold water, and cook ten minutes; add a few grains of salt, a teaspoon of butter, a few drops of red coloring, and serve hot.

611.—GINGER SAUCE

½ cup sugar 2 tablespoons water
¼ cup molasses 2 tablespoons vinegar
1 teaspoon butter ½ tablespoon ginger

Mix in order given, boil for five minutes, and serve hot with Indian Pudding (see No. 553) or Steamed Fruit Pudding (see No. 551).

612.—HARD SAUCE

¼ cup butter 1 teaspoon vanilla, or
1 cup powdered sugar ¼ teaspoon nutmeg
1 teaspoon milk

Cream butter, add sugar and milk gradually, and beat until very light; add flavoring, and chill before serving.

613.—LEMON SAUCE

¾ cup sugar 1 teaspoon butter
2 teaspoons cornstarch Juice and rind of ½ lemon, or
1/8 teaspoon salt ½ teaspoon lemon extract
1½ cups hot water

Mix sugar, cornstarch, and salt; add hot water, stir constantly until boiling point is reached, and simmer ten[Pg 212] minutes; add butter and flavoring. One teaspoon of vanilla or one-half nutmeg grated may be used instead of lemon.

614.—MARSHMALLOW SAUCE

1 cup sugar 1 cup marshmallows
½ cup boiling water ½ teaspoon vanilla

Boil sugar and water five minutes, add marshmallows, beat until they are melted, and add vanilla. Beat well before serving. Serve hot or cold.

615.—MOCHA SAUCE

¼ cup butter or Crisco 1 teaspoon powdered soluble coffee
1 cup powdered sugar 1 tablespoon cocoa
2 tablespoons milk

Cream shortening, add sugar and milk gradually, and beat until light; add coffee and cocoa, and blend well.

616.—ORANGE MARMALADE SAUCE

½ cup orange marmalade ½ cup boiling water
½ tablespoon butter

Mix and serve hot with Cottage Pudding (see No. 549), steamed puddings, or griddle cakes.

617.—SOFT SAUCE

To Hard Sauce (see No. 612) add two tablespoons of hot milk, a few drops at a time; beat well, and do not chill.

618.—STRAWBERRY SAUCE

2 tablespoons butter 2 tablespoons boiling water
¾ cup powdered sugar 1 cup crushed strawberries

Cream butter, add half of sugar gradually; add remaining half of sugar alternately with the water; beat well, and add strawberries. Blackberries or raspberries may be used instead of strawberries.[Pg 213]


CHAPTER XXVIII

PASTRIES

619.—PLAIN PASTE

1½ cups flour ¼ cup shortening
¼ teaspoon salt 1/3 cup ice water
¼ teaspoon baking powder ¼ cup butter

Sift flour, salt, and baking powder; rub in shortening with finger tips until mixture is like fine meal; add water gradually until a soft but not sticky dough is formed, mixing with a knife; when dough is mixed, the side of the bowl should be clean, neither sticky nor dry with flour. Slightly more or less water may be needed. Roll paste, on a lightly floured board, into an even rectangular shape; divide butter into three parts; cover two-thirds of paste with dots of butter, using one part; fold first the unbuttered third, then the remaining third, so that there will be three layers of paste with butter between; roll out again, dot with butter as before, and fold; repeat for third time. Put paste on ice until thoroughly chilled. Any good shortening may be used in place of butter, but the butter flavor will be lacking. This is enough for one pie with two crusts; double the amount of paste can be made with the same amount of labor. It keeps well if wrapped in cheesecloth and put in a cool place.

620.—RICH PASTE

3 cups flour 1¼ cups shortening
1 teaspoon sugar 1 tablespoon lemon juice
½ teaspoon salt Ice water

Sift flour, sugar, and salt; add shortening, and rub in with finger tips or chop with a knife in each hand until[Pg 214] mixture is like fine meal; add lemon juice and enough water to form a stiff paste (about two-thirds of a cup); roll out into a thin sheet and fold in four layers; roll out and fold three times. Chill before using. This rule makes two pies. It is less expensive than puff paste, and yet is a very good substitute for it.

621.—PATTY SHELLS

Roll paste one-eighth of an inch thick, cover inverted tin patty pans or individual pie dishes, trim paste evenly, and press down the edge firmly; prick with a fork, place on a baking sheet, and bake in a hot oven about twelve minutes. Remove pans, and fill with any cooked fruit mixture, berries, or creamed meats or vegetables.

622.—PIE SHELL

Roll paste one-quarter inch thick, cover an inverted tin pie plate, trim, and press the edges firmly; prick with a fork, place on a baking sheet, and bake in a hot oven about fifteen minutes. Fill with cooked pie mixtures and cover with a meringue, or garnish with bits of pastry which have been cut in fancy shapes and baked.

623.—TART SHELLS

Roll Rich Paste (see No. 620) one-third of an inch thick, cut into small rounds, moisten the edges of half of them with cold water, cut out the centers of the other half with a small cutter, place upon whole rounds, and press firmly together; chill, and bake in a hot oven about twenty minutes. Fill with jelly, jam, or fruit paste. When shells are to be filled with creamed meats, etc., cut with a larger cutter.[Pg 215]

624.—MINCE MEAT

4 cups cooked beef chopped 1 pound citron shredded
2 cups chopped suet 2 tablespoons salt
8 cups chopped apples 1 tablespoon cinnamon
1 cup brown sugar 1 tablespoon mace
2 cups molasses 1 teaspoon clove
1 glass tart jelly 1 teaspoon allspice
1½ pounds seeded raisins ½ teaspoon pepper
1 pound washed currants 1 quart boiled cider

Mix, and cook slowly about two hours, stirring frequently. One cup of chopped cranberries may be substituted for the jelly. Store in jars or in a stone crock. If mince meat grows dry by standing, moisten with a little coffee.

625.—MOCK MINCE MEAT (Uncooked)

1½ cups chopped apples ½ teaspoon cinnamon
¼ cup raisins seeded and chopped ½ teaspoon mace
¼ cup cranberries chopped ¼ teaspoon clove
¼ cup currants ¾ cup brown sugar
1 tablespoon citron shredded ¼ cup vinegar
¼ cup beef fat melted ½ cup coffee
½ teaspoon salt

Mix in order given and let stand a few hours before using. (Fills one large pie.)

626.—GREEN TOMATO MINCE MEAT

1½ cups green tomatoes chopped ¼ cup water
1½ cups apple chopped ¾ teaspoon cinnamon
¾ cup raisins seeded and chopped ½ teaspoon mace
1 cup brown sugar ¼ teaspoon clove
¼ cup beef fat melted ¾ teaspoon salt
2 tablespoons vinegar ½ cup jelly, fruit sirup, or grape juice

Mix and cook slowly for one hour. (Fills two pies.)[Pg 216]

627.—MERINGUE FOR TARTS AND PIES

Whites of 2 eggs ¼ cup granulated sugar

Beat the whites of eggs very stiff; add sugar gradually, spread over tarts or pies, mounding in the center; put in a slow oven, and bake about ten minutes for tarts and fifteen minutes for pies. If baked slowly, meringue will not settle.

628.—ONE-EGG MERINGUE

White of 1 egg 1 teaspoon baking powder
½ cup granulated sugar ¼ teaspoon extract

Beat the egg until stiff, add gradually sugar mixed with baking powder, flavor, spread on tarts or pies, and bake in a moderate oven ten minutes.

629.—SLICED APPLE PIE

3½ cups pared and sliced apples 1/8 teaspoon salt
½ cup sugar 1/3 teaspoon nutmeg or cinnamon

Line a plate with paste, fill with apples, mounding them in the center; mix sugar, salt, and seasoning, and cover apples; moisten edge of paste with water; roll out paste for top crust, cut one-half inch larger than plate, and cut a few small gashes in the center; cover pie, turn edge under the lower crust, and press firmly. Brush with milk, and bake about forty minutes. The oven should be hot for the first fifteen minutes, and then the heat should be reduced.

630.—BLUEBERRY PIE

2½ cups blueberries 2½ tablespoons flour
2/3 cup sugar 1 teaspoon butter

Line a pie plate with paste; fill with berries, add sugar and flour mixed, and dot butter over top. Cover, and bake the same as Apple Pie (see No. 629).[Pg 217]

631.—CHERRY PIE

Follow recipe for Blueberry Pie (see No. 630), using stoned cherries in place of blueberries and adding one-fourth cup more sugar.

632.—MOCK CHERRY PIE

1½ cups cranberries chopped and rinsed 1 cup sugar
½ cup raisins seeded and chopped ½ cup water
2 tablespoons sifted crumbs or flour

Mix, and bake in two crusts, the same as Apple Pie (see No. 629).

633.—CRANBERRY PIE

2 cups cranberries 2 tablespoons sifted crumbs
1¼ cups sugar ½ cup hot water

Chop cranberries, rinse, and mix with sugar, crumbs, and water. Roll paste one-quarter inch thick, cover a perforated tin plate, trim the edge evenly, and moisten edge with water; fill with cranberries, cover with half-inch strips of paste placed half an inch apart to form a lattice top; trim the edges neatly, moisten, and finish with a half-inch strip of paste around the edge. Bake about forty minutes. The oven should be hot for the first fifteen minutes, and then the heat should be reduced.

634.—OPEN CRANBERRY PIE

1½ cups cranberries 2/3 cup water
1 cup sugar 2 tablespoons sifted crumbs

Mix berries, sugar, and water, and cook for ten minutes, stirring frequently to break the berries; add crumbs, and when nearly cool pour into a baked pie shell. Garnish with bits of baked pastry.[Pg 218]

635.—CUSTARD PIE (Cake Crumbs)

2 cups hot milk 1 egg slightly beaten
½ cup dry cake crumbs 1/8 teaspoon salt
2 tablespoons sugar Nutmeg

Mix crumbs and milk, let stand for five minutes, and press through a sieve; add sugar, egg, and salt; line a deep plate with paste rolled thin; build up a firm edge of crust, fill with custard, and dust with nutmeg. Bake about forty minutes. The oven should be hot for the first ten minutes, and then the heat should be reduced.

636.—GOOSEBERRY PIE

To recipe for Gooseberry Patties (see No. 648) add two tablespoons of dried and sifted crumbs. Prepare and bake the same as Cranberry Pie (see No. 633).

637.—LEMON PIE

1 slice bread one inch thick Yolks 2 eggs
1 cup boiling water 1/8 teaspoon salt
1 cup sugar Rind and juice 1 lemon

Remove crusts from bread; cover bread with boiling water, let stand a few minutes, and press through a sieve; add sugar, egg yolks slightly beaten, salt, lemon rind, and lemon juice. Prepare paste, fill, and bake the same as Custard Pie (see No. 635). Make a Meringue (see No. 627) of the whites of eggs.

638.—MARLBOROUGH PIE

6 apples Grated rind and juice 1 lemon
1/3 cup sugar 1 teaspoon cinnamon
2 macaroons rolled ¼ teaspoon salt
2 tablespoons butter 2 eggs slightly beaten

Pare and slice apples, add one-quarter cup of water; cook until soft, and rub through a sieve; add other ingredients[Pg 219] in order given. Line a deep plate or patty tins with rich paste, fill, and bake about forty minutes. Cake crumbs may be substituted for macaroons.

639.—MINCE PIE

Line a perforated tin plate with paste, rolled one-fourth inch thick; fill with mince meat, moisten edges with water, and cover with an upper crust with a few small gashes cut in it; turn the edge under lower crust about half an inch, press firmly, and trim edges of paste with a knife, slanting toward the center; brush with milk, and bake in a hot oven about half an hour.

640.—ORANGE PIE

1½ cups hot milk Juice of 1 orange
½ cup cake crumbs 1 egg slightly beaten
½ cup sugar 1/8 teaspoon salt
Grated rind of ½ orange

Mix milk and crumbs, let stand five minutes, and press through a fine sieve; add other ingredients. Prepare paste, fill, and bake the same as Custard Pie (see No. 635).

641.—PINEAPPLE PIE

1 can grated pineapple Few grains salt
1 cup sugar 1 egg
2½ tablespoons flour ½ tablespoon butter

Mix sugar, flour, and salt, add beaten egg, and mix with pineapple; pour into a deep pie plate lined with paste, add butter in small pieces, cover with strips of paste, and bake in a hot oven about forty minutes, reducing the heat during second half of baking.[Pg 220]

642.—PRUNE PIE

2 cups cooked prunes 1 tablespoon flour
½ cup sugar Grated rind of ½ orange

Stone prunes, cut in quarters, and put into a paste-lined plate; cover with sugar, flour, and rind mixed. Cover with upper crust, brush with milk, and bake in a hot oven half an hour, reducing the heat during second half of baking.

643.—PUMPKIN PIE

1½ cups baked pumpkin ½ teaspoon ginger
1 egg well beaten 1 teaspoon cinnamon
2/3 cup brown sugar ½ teaspoon cornstarch
½ teaspoon salt 1½ cups milk

Cut pumpkin in pieces and bake in a hot oven; mash and strain, and to one and a half cups add the other ingredients in order given. Prepare paste and bake the same as Custard Pie (see No. 635).

644.—RAISIN PIE

½ cup raisins seeded and chopped ¼ cup vinegar
1½ cups hot water 2 tablespoons butter
1 cup brown sugar ½ cup sifted crumbs

Mix, and cook for ten minutes; cool; and bake the same as Cranberry Pie (see No. 633).

645.—RHUBARB PIE

2 cups rhubarb 1 cup sugar
2 tablespoons sultana raisins Grating of nutmeg
¼ cup sifted crumbs Few grains salt

Cut rhubarb in half-inch pieces, place in a strainer, and scald with boiling water; drain, put into a paste-lined[Pg 221] plate, cover with raisins, crumbs, sugar, and nutmeg and salt mixed; cover with an upper crust, and bake the same as Apple Pie (see No. 629).

646.—SQUASH PIE

1½ cups cooked squash ¼ teaspoon cinnamon
1 cup sugar ½ teaspoon nutmeg
¾ teaspoon salt 1 egg beaten
¼ cup sifted crumbs 1½ cups milk

Mix in order given. Prepare paste, fill, and bake the same as Custard Pie (see No. 635).

647.—BANBURY TARTS

1 cup raisins Juice and rind of 1 lemon
¾ cup sugar ¼ cup sifted crumbs

Seed and chop raisins, and mix with sugar, lemon, and crumbs. Roll paste one-eighth inch thick, and cut in three-inch rounds; put half a tablespoon of raisin mixture on half of each round, moisten edges with water, fold double, and press edges firmly together. Prick with a fork, and bake in a hot oven about fifteen minutes.

648.—GOOSEBERRY PATTIES

Remove tops and stems from one pint of gooseberries; wash, add one-half cup water, and cook about fifteen minutes, or until soft and well broken; add one cup of sugar, and cool; line patty pans with paste, fill with gooseberries, cover with narrow strips of paste to form a lattice. Bake in a hot oven twenty-five minutes.

649.—PRUNE AND APPLE TART FILLING

Use recipe for Prune and Apple Shortcake (see No. 445), fill cooked paste shells, and garnish with bits of cooked paste.[Pg 222]

650.—PRUNE PATTIES

Line patty pans with paste; prepare filling as for Prune Pie (see No. 642); mix, and fill pans; cover with a lattice-work of narrow strips of paste, and finish with a narrow strip of paste around the outer edge. Bake in a hot oven about twenty-five minutes.

651.—INDIVIDUAL RASPBERRY PIE

Roll paste one-eighth inch thick, cut into circles two and a half inches in diameter. Put a tablespoon of raspberry jam on half of them, and moisten the edges with water. With a small round cutter make three holes in each remaining circle, place on top of jam, press edges firmly together, and bake about fifteen minutes in a hot oven. Bake the small cut-out pieces of paste, and serve with soup.

652.—RHUBARB MERINGUE PATTIES

2 cups rhubarb 1 egg yolk beaten
¼ cup water 3 tablespoons sifted crumbs
1 cup sugar 1 teaspoon butter

Cut rhubarb in half-inch pieces and cook with water ten minutes; add sugar, egg yolk, crumbs, and butter, and cook five minutes; when cool, fill Patty Shells (see No. 621), cover with One-egg Meringue (see No. 628), and bake ten minutes in a moderate oven.

653.—SQUASH PATTIES (without Eggs)

2 cups cooked and sifted squash 1 tablespoon dried and sifted crumbs
½ cup sugar ½ teaspoon lemon extract
2/3 teaspoon salt

Mix in order given. Line patty pans with paste, fill with squash, and bake in a hot oven about twenty-five minutes.[Pg 223]

654.—CHEESE STRAWS

½ cup flour 1/8 teaspoon mustard
1 tablespoon shortening ¼ teaspoon paprika
¼ cup grated cheese ¼ teaspoon baking powder
1/8 teaspoon salt Ice water

Rub shortening into flour with finger tips; add cheese, seasonings, and baking powder, and mix to a stiff dough with ice water. Roll out, fold in four layers, roll out again and fold as before; put on ice to chill; roll out one-third inch thick, and cut into four-inch straws. Bake in a hot oven about twelve minutes.

655.—CHEESE STRAWS (Left-over Paste)

Roll trimmings of pastry into a thin sheet, sprinkle with grated cheese and paprika; fold in four layers; repeat; chill, cut into straws, and bake in a hot oven about twelve minutes.

656.—CHEESE WAFERS

Prepare paste as for Cheese Straws (see No. 654); roll out very thin, cut with a two-inch cutter, and bake in a hot oven about six minutes.

657.—CINNAMON HEARTS

Roll Rich Paste (see No. 620) very thin in an even rectangular shape; sprinkle with powdered sugar mixed with a little cinnamon. The paste should be about twelve inches long. Fold each end toward the center two inches; fold each end again toward the center; fold double, and chill. Cut in one-third-inch slices, place flat side down on a baking sheet two inches apart, and bake in a hot oven about eight minutes.[Pg 224]


CHAPTER XXIX

FRUITS, COOKED AND UNCOOKED[13]

658.—TO COOK DRIED FRUIT

Wash thoroughly in two or three cold waters; put in granite kettle, cover with water, and soak twenty-four hours; cook very slowly two or three hours until tender; add sugar, and simmer half an hour.

659.—BAKED APPLES WITH DATES

Wipe and core apples, and place in baking dish (not tin); in each cavity put a stoned date, a tablespoon of sugar, and two tablespoons of boiling water; bake in a moderate oven about half an hour, basting often. Apple jelly may be used in place of dates, or sugar may be mixed with a little cinnamon or nutmeg.

660.—GRAPE AND APPLE JELLY

½ peck grapes Sugar
3 tart apples

Pick over, stew, and mash grapes, put in kettle with apples, which have been coarsely chopped, but not pared or cored; heat to boiling point, mash, and boil thirty minutes; strain through a jelly bag; measure juice, return to kettle, and boil five minutes; add an equal amount of heated sugar, and boil three minutes. Skim well and pour into glasses.[Pg 225]

661.—SPICED APPLE JELLY

Wash apples, cut in quarters, cover with equal parts of water and vinegar, and cook half an hour; drain; and to each quart of juice add one-third cup of mixed spices (tied in a bag), and boil twenty minutes. Remove spices. Add heated sugar, allowing one quart for each quart of juice. Boil ten minutes, and pour into glasses. When cold and firm cover with melted paraffin.

662.—GRAPE JUICE AND APPLE SAUCE

1 cup grape juice 4 apples
½ cup sugar 4 slices sponge cake or toast

Boil grape juice and sugar for five minutes; pare, core, and slice apples, and cook in grape juice until tender; cool, and serve on toast or cake. Two cups of grapes cooked with one-half cup of water and pressed through a sieve may be used in place of juice.

663.—DARK RED APPLE SAUCE

8 tart apples ½ teaspoon nutmeg
1 cup sugar ½ cup hot water

Pare and core apples, and cut into eighths; put into an earthen dish; add sugar, nutmeg, and hot water; cover closely, and bake in a slow oven three hours.

664.—BAKED BANANAS

Peel, scrape, and slice six bananas; put into a greased baking dish in layers, and sprinkle each layer with brown sugar; dot a tablespoon of butter over the top, and sprinkle with the juice of half a lemon. Bake in a moderate oven half an hour.[Pg 226]

665.—BANANAS WITH FIGS AND NUTS

4 bananas 2 tablespoons powdered sugar
4 figs ¼ cup chopped nut meats

Peel, scrape, and slice bananas; wash, dry, and chop figs; spread over bananas; sprinkle with sugar and nut meats, and serve with cream. Grape nuts may be used in place of nut meats.

666.—MOCK BAR-LE-DUC CURRANTS

½ cup large, hard cranberries ½ cup boiling water
1 cup sugar

Cut cranberries in quarters, place in colander, and wash under running water to remove the seeds; heat sugar and water slowly to the boiling point, and boil seven minutes; add cranberries, and boil seven minutes. Seal in small glasses.

667.—RED CURRANT CONSERVE

2 pounds red currants 1 cup raisins
2 oranges 1½ pounds sugar

Wash currants; grate rind of oranges and remove pulp; seed raisins and cut in halves; put in preserving kettle with sugar, heat gradually to boiling point, and simmer until as thick as marmalade.

668.—CRANBERRY CONSERVE

1 quart cranberries 1 cup raisins seeded and chopped
1 cup water 2¼ cups sugar
Grated rind 1 orange ½ cup nut meats chopped
Pulp and juice of 2 oranges

Wash cranberries and chop rather coarsely; put in colander and rinse with running water to remove seeds;[Pg 227] add water, oranges, and raisins; cook fifteen minutes; add sugar and boil two minutes; add nut meats and pour into glasses.

669.—SPICED CRANBERRIES

1 quart cranberries 2 teaspoons cinnamon
2 cups brown sugar ¼ teaspoon clove
½ cup vinegar ¼ teaspoon allspice
¼ cup water

Mix in order given, heat slowly to the boiling point, and simmer half an hour. Serve with cold meats.

670.—PRESERVED CRANBERRIES

½ cup water 1 cup cranberries
1 cup sugar

Heat water and sugar to the boiling point, and cook five minutes; add berries, and simmer for fifteen minutes, skimming when necessary. The berries should be unbroken. (Useful for garnishing.)

671.—CRANBERRY SAUCE

1 pint cranberries 1 cup sugar
½ cup water

Pick over and wash berries, add the water, and cook until very soft. Mash with a wooden spoon, add the sugar, and cook until sugar is dissolved. For thick cranberry jelly, press through a sieve and pour into glasses.

672.—FIG PASTE (Laxative)

1 pound prunes ½ pound figs
1 ounce senna leaves Cold water

Soak prunes over night in cold water to cover, add the senna leaves tied in cheesecloth, and cook slowly until[Pg 228] prunes are tender. Stone the prunes, and chop fine; add figs chopped fine, put in top of double boiler, remove senna, add prune juice, and cook until thick.

673.—CANDIED GRAPE FRUIT PEEL

Cut grape fruit peel into thin strips, and soak twenty-four hours in salted water, allowing one teaspoon of salt to each quart of water; drain, cover with cold water, and boil about one hour, or until tender, changing the water once; drain, weigh peel, and add an equal weight of sugar; heat slowly, and cook until sugar is almost absorbed; spread on a platter to dry for five or six hours; roll in powdered sugar. If put in airtight jars it will keep indefinitely. Orange or lemon peel may be used in the same way.

674.—BAKED PEARS

8 hard pears ½ cup boiling water
¾ cup sugar 4 cloves

Wipe pears, remove stems, and put in an earthen dish; add sugar, water, and cloves; cover, and bake in a slow oven for four hours, basting occasionally. Serve cold.

675.—PEAR AND GINGER MARMALADE

8 pounds hard pears ¼ pound preserved ginger
Grated rind 4 lemons 6 pounds sugar
Juice of 4 lemons

Quarter and core pears, and put through food chopper; add lemon rind, juice, and ginger (chopped); mix fruit with sugar, heat gradually to boiling point, and cook slowly about two hours, or until thick.[Pg 229]

676.—SPICED PRUNES

2 cups cooked prunes Juice of 1 orange
¼ cup chopped cranberries Few gratings orange rind
½ cup prune juice ½ teaspoon cinnamon
2 tablespoons sugar ¼ teaspoon paprika

Stone prunes, cut in small pieces, add other ingredients, and simmer twenty minutes. Serve with cold meats.

677.—QUINCE HONEY

6 quinces 1 quart water
3½ pounds sugar

Pare, quarter, and core quinces; to the cores and parings add one pint of water, simmer half an hour, and press through a sieve. Chop quinces, using the finest cutter, add a pint of water, and simmer while cores are cooking; add pulp and juice from cores and boil ten minutes; add sugar and boil about five minutes, or until it jellies.

678.—BAKED RHUBARB AND BANANAS

2 cups rhubarb ¾ cup sugar
3 bananas 1 tablespoon butter

Wash rhubarb and cut, unpeeled, into one-inch pieces; peel and slice bananas, and arrange in a baking dish in alternate layers with the rhubarb; add sugar and butter, cover, and bake in a slow oven two hours. Serve hot or cold.

679.—RHUBARB AND ORANGE MARMALADE

4 cups rhubarb Juice ½ lemon
4 oranges 6 cups sugar
1 tablespoon orange rind grated

Cut rhubarb in half-inch pieces; add pulp and juice of oranges, rind, lemon juice, and sugar. Cook slowly until juice will "jell" when tried on a cold plate.[Pg 230]

680.—RHUBARB AND FIG MARMALADE

3 pounds rhubarb 1 teaspoon ginger
1 pound figs ¼ teaspoon clove
3 pounds sugar ¼ teaspoon salt
1 lemon

Cut rhubarb unpeeled into inch pieces; wash figs and put through food chopper; put in preserving kettle with half of sugar and let stand over night; in the morning boil until clear, then add remaining sugar, juice and grated rind of lemon, and seasonings. Cook slowly until thickened.

681.—THREE-IN-ONE MARMALADE

Cut in halves one grape fruit, one orange, and one lemon; remove pulp with a teaspoon, saving juice and discarding seeds; remove the membrane from peels, and put peel through the food chopper, using medium cutter; mix peel, pulp, and juice; measure, and to each cup add three cups of cold water; let stand over night; heat slowly to the boiling point, and cook one hour, or until peel is tender; measure, add an equal amount of sugar; boil about forty minutes, or until a little will "jell" when tried on a cold plate.

682.—RED TOMATO JAM

3 pounds ripe tomatoes 1 teaspoon ginger
3 pounds sugar ¼ teaspoon salt
2 lemons

Scald and peel tomatoes; cut in halves crosswise and discard seeds; put in preserving kettle with sugar, lemon juice, and ginger; cook slowly about two hours, stirring often with a wooden spoon. Skim when necessary. This may be kept in a stone crock or sealed in glasses.[Pg 231]

683.—SWEET PICKLED WATERMELON RIND

Rind of ½ watermelon 1½ tablespoons cinnamon
3 pounds brown sugar 1 tablespoon cloves
1 quart vinegar 1 tablespoon allspice

Pare melon rind, cut in inch squares, wash, and drain; put sugar and vinegar in a preserving kettle, add spices tied in a bag, and boil one hour; add melon rind, and cook about one hour, or until tender; put melon rind into a stone crock, boil sirup hard for fifteen minutes, and pour over melon.

[Pg 232]


CHAPTER XXX

CANDIES

684.—PLAIN FONDANT

4 cups granulated sugar 1/8 teaspoon cream of tartar
1 cup boiling water

Put sugar in a smooth, clean saucepan, add boiling water, and stir until dissolved; heat slowly to boiling point, add cream of tartar, and boil without stirring to 240° F., or until sirup will form a soft ball when tested in cold water. As sirup granulates around the sides of saucepan, wash down with a clean brush which has been dipped quickly into cold water; pour out upon a slightly oiled slab or large platter; as the edges begin to harden, turn them toward the center, and when the mixture is partly cooled work with a wooden spatula or butter paddle until creamy; when it begins to lump, knead with the hands until smooth. Let stand a few hours before using, or keep in a covered jar until needed.

685.—COFFEE FONDANT

Follow recipe for Plain Fondant (see No. 684), using strong, clear coffee in place of water. Or, if only a small quantity is needed, melt plain fondant over hot water and add one teaspoon of instantaneous coffee to each cup. This may be used melted for mints, or for dipping, or, when cooled, for centers.[Pg 233]

686.—BONBON CENTERS

Cut candied fruits or nuts into small pieces, and work with a bit of fondant into small balls; let stand a few hours before dipping. Keep centers small so that bonbons will not be too large when finished.

687.—FONDANT BONBONS

Melt fondant over hot water; flavor and color as desired; dip bonbon centers one at a time, and remove with a fork or confectioners' dipper; place on an oiled slab or platter until cold.

688.—CHOCOLATE BONBONS

Melt bitter chocolate in a cup over hot water, and dip centers the same as for Fondant Bonbons (see No. 687). Dot chocolate (sweetened) may be used if preferred. Confectioners' chocolate is best for dipping, but cooking chocolate is satisfactory if half a teaspoon of butter is melted with each four squares.

689.—FONDANT MINTS

Put Plain Fondant (see No. 684) in cups, melt over hot water, and flavor with a few drops of oil of spearmint, wintergreen, orange, lime, or any desired flavor; color lightly if desired, and drop from a teaspoon upon an oiled slab or platter.

690.—QUICK FONDANT

Break the white of an egg into a bowl, add a tablespoon of water and about two cups of confectioners' sugar, or enough to knead. Flavor with oil, extracts, or grated[Pg 234] orange or lemon rind, and color as desired. Use for mints (rolled and cut), stuffing dates, prunes, cherries or nuts, or for bonbon centers.

691.—QUICK MINTS

1 cup sugar 1/8 teaspoon cream of tartar
½ cup boiling water 3 drops oil of spearmint

Put sugar into a smooth, clean saucepan, add boiling water, and stir until dissolved; add cream of tartar, and boil to 234° F., or about five minutes; cool slightly, add flavoring, beat until creamy, and drop from a teaspoon on an oiled slab or platter. If mixture thickens before all is used, add a few drops of boiling water. Oil or essence of wintergreen, lime, orange, etc., may be used instead of spearmint, and mixture may be colored lightly to correspond with flavoring.

692.—AFTER-DINNER MINTS

2 cups sugar ½ cup boiling water
¼ cup molasses 4 drops oil of spearmint

Put sugar and molasses into a smooth, clean saucepan, add boiling water, heat gradually to the boiling point, and boil to 258° F., or until candy becomes brittle when tested in cold water; add flavoring, pour on an oiled slab or platter, and when cool enough to handle pull until nearly white; pull into long strips about half an inch in diameter, and cut in small pieces with scissors; roll in powdered sugar, and keep in a covered jar for several days before using.

693.—APRICOT PASTE

Follow recipe for Mint Paste (see No. 694), omitting spearmint and coloring, and adding one cup of stewed[Pg 235] and strained dried apricots (without juice); roll in confectioners' sugar, or dip in melted fondant or chocolate.

694.—MINT PASTE

1 box granulated gelatine ¼ cup lemon juice
2/3 cup cold water Grated rind 1 orange
1 cup boiling water 5 drops oil of spearmint
2 cups sugar Green coloring

Soak gelatine in cold water five minutes; dissolve in boiling water; add sugar, and stir until dissolved; add lemon juice, and boil twenty minutes; add rind, flavoring, and coloring; pour into a small pan and let stand for several hours; cut into cubes and roll in confectioners' sugar. Oil of wintergreen, cloves, or cinnamon may be used in place of spearmint, and other coloring may be used.

695.—TURKISH DELIGHT

1 box granulated gelatine 3 tablespoons lemon juice
2/3 cup strained orange juice Grated rind 1 orange
1 cup boiling water ¼ cup nut meats cut fine
2 cups sugar ½ cup candied fruit cut fine

Soak gelatine in orange juice five minutes; dissolve in boiling water, add sugar and lemon juice, and stir until sugar is dissolved; boil twenty minutes; add rind, and, when nearly cold, add nuts and fruit and pour into a small pan; let stand several hours, cut in cubes, and roll in confectioners' sugar. Paste may be colored pink by adding red gelatine to the orange juice.[Pg 236]

696.—FRUIT WAFERS

½ pound prunes Juice and grated rind ½ lemon
½ pound figs Confectioners' sugar
½ pound dates

Soak prunes and figs in cold water over night, drain and wipe dry; cut prunes from stones, stone dates, and put all fruit through food chopper, using finest cutter; add lemon rind, juice, and sugar enough to knead to a firm paste; roll on a sugared board to one-fourth-inch thickness, and cut in small rounds, squares, or diamonds. Or form paste into small balls, and roll in coconut or chopped nut meats. One-half cup of finely chopped nut meats may be added to the paste. This is an excellent filling for stuffed dates.

697.—SPICED RAISINS

2 cups large raisins seeded ½ teaspoon cinnamon
½ tablespoon butter ½ teaspoon mace
2 tablespoons vinegar ¼ teaspoon clove
2 tablespoons water

Cook very slowly until raisins are plump and liquid has evaporated. Cool, and roll in granulated sugar.

698.—STUFFED DATES

Wash one pound large dates, dry, and remove stones; stuff with plain fondant, or fondant mixed with candied fruits or nuts; or stuff with a seeded raisin, or a piece of date, fig, or pineapple. Roll in confectioners' sugar.

699.—STUFFED PRUNES

1 pound large prunes ½ cup confectioners' sugar
½ pound dried apricots

Wash fruit, soak over night, drain and dry; remove stones from prunes with a knife; put apricots through[Pg 237] food chopper, mix with sugar, and fill prunes; roll in confectioners' sugar.

700.—MARRONS GLACÉS

2 cups sugar 1 tablespoon corn sirup
1½ cups water 1 pint chestnuts

Shell one pint of chestnuts (see No. 243) and simmer in a sirup made of sugar and water until chestnuts are tender but not broken. Drain from sirup; cook the sirup with the corn sirup to 310° F., or until sirup begins to discolor. Remove saucepan from fire, place in a saucepan of hot water, put chestnuts on a dipping needle or long pin, and dip in sirup until thoroughly coated; place on an oiled platter.

701.—NUTS AND FRUITS GLACÉ

2 cups sugar 1/8 teaspoon cream of tartar
1 cup water

Boil sugar, water, and cream of tartar to 310° F. Follow directions for dipping Marrons Glacés (see No. 700). Cherries, strawberries, orange sections, grapes, or mint and rose leaves may be dipped in the same way.[Pg 239][Pg 238]


APPENDIX

A.—TABLE OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES

1 teaspoon = 60 drops
3 teaspoons = 1 tablespoon
16 tablespoons = 1 cup
1 cup = ½ pint
2 pints = 1 quart
Butter, 2 tablespoons solidly packed = 1 ounce
Butter, 2 cups solidly packed = 1 pound
Chocolate, 1 square = 1 ounce
Coffee, 4-1/3 cups = 1 pound
Eggs, 9 in shells = 1 pound
English Walnuts, chopped, 5 cups = 1 pound
Flour, 4 tablespoons = 1 ounce
Flour, Pastry, 4 cups = 1 pound
Flour, Bread, 4 cups = 1 pound
Flour, Entire Wheat, 3-7/8 cups = 1 pound
Flour, Graham, 4½ cups = 1 pound
Meat, 2 cups finely chopped = 1 pound
Oatmeal, 2-2/3 cups = 1 pound
Oats, Rolled, 5 cups = 1 pound
Rice, 1-7/8 cups = 1 pound
Rye Meal, 4-1/3 cups = 1 pound
Sugar, Brown, 2-2/3 cups = 1 pound
Sugar, Confectioners', 3½ cups = 1 pound
Sugar, Granulated, 2 cups = 1 pound
Sugar, Powdered, 2-2/3 cups = 1 pound
Sugar or Salt, 2 tablespoons = 1 ounce

[Pg 240]


B.—TIME TABLE FOR COOKING

BAKING

Beans, Boston Baked 8 hours
Biscuits, Baking Powder (according to size) 12-15 minutes
Raised (according to size) 12-20 minutes
Bread (ten-cent loaf) 50 minutes
Breads, Baking Powder Muffins (according to size) 18-30 minutes
Corn Bread (shallow pan) 15-20 minutes
Gingerbread (shallow pan) 25 minutes
Popovers (according to size) 25-30 minutes
Yeast Muffins (according to size) 20-30 minutes
Cake, Fruit 1¼ to 2 hours
Layer 15-20 minutes
Loaf (shallow pan) 30 minutes
Sponge (deep pan) 40 minutes
Cookies and Wafers 6-15 minutes
Cup Custards 25 minutes
Fish, whole, 4 pounds 1 hour
Fillets, or whole small 20-30 minutes
Meats, Fillet of Beef (medium) 45-60 minutes
Rump of Beef (medium) per pound 17 minutes
Sirloin or Rib of Beef (medium) per pound 15 minutes
Chicken, per pound 18 minutes
Duck, Domestic 1 to 1¼ hours
Duck, Wild 15-20 minutes
Goose, Domestic, per pound 20 minutes
Leg of Lamb, per pound 18 minutes
Pork Chops 30 minutes
Loin of Pork, per pound 22 minutes
Turkey, per pound 20 minutes
Loin of Veal, per pound 22 minutes
Pies 35-45 minutes
Rice or Tapioca Pudding, Cooked 45 minutes
Rice or Tapioca Pudding, Uncooked 2½ to 3½ hours

[Pg 241]

BOILING

[Pg 242]

Cereals
Corn Meal 2 hours
Hominy 2-3 hours
Macaroni 20-30 minutes
Oatmeal 4 hours
Rice 20-30 minutes
Rolled Oats ½ hour
Spaghetti 20 minutes
Granulated or Rolled Wheat ½ hour
Eggs
Soft-cooked 3-5 minutes
Hard-cooked 20 minutes
Fish
Bass, per pound 12 minutes
Bluefish, per pound 12 minutes
Cod, per pound 6 minutes
Halibut, per pound 12 minutes
Lobster, whole 20 minutes
Salmon, per pound 12 minutes
Small fish 6-10 minutes
Meats
Corned Beef 3-4 hours
Fresh Beef 3 hours
Fowl, per pound 30 minutes
Ham, per pound 25 minutes
Mutton (leg), per pound 25 minutes
Corned Tongue 3½ hours
Fresh Tongue 2½ hours
Vegetables
Artichokes 30-45 minutes
Asparagus 20-30 minutes
Dried Beans 3-4 hours
Lima and other Shell Beans 1 to 1¼ hours
String Beans 1-2 hours
Beets, old 2-4 hours
Beets, young 45 minutes
Brussels Sprouts 20 minutes
Cabbage 20-30 minutes
Cauliflower 25 minutes
Green Corn 10 minutes
Onions 1 to 1½ hours
Oyster Plant (whole) 45 minutes
Parsnips 45-60 minutes
Peas, Fresh 20-60 minutes
Peas, Dried 3 hours
Potatoes, White 20-30 minutes
Potatoes, Sweet 20-25 minutes
Spinach 25-30 minutes
Tomatoes (stewed) 20-30 minutes
Turnips, Yellow 1½ to 2 hours
Turnips, White 1 to 1½ hours

BROILING

Bacon and Ham, sliced thin 4 minutes
Chicken, Spring 20 minutes
Chops, Lamb or Mutton 6-10 minutes
Fish, Slices Cod, Halibut, Salmon, Swordfish 12-15 minutes
Fish, whole small, Smelt, Trout 8-10 minutes
Fish, whole split, Bluefish, Scrod, Shad, Whitefish 18-22 minutes
Oysters 3-4 minutes
Steak, 1 inch thick (medium) 8 minutes
Squab 10-12 minutes
Tripe and Liver 6 minutes

FRYING

Chops or Cutlets, Breaded 5-8 minutes
Croquettes and Fishballs 1 minute
Doughnuts, Drop Cakes, Fritters, Muffins 3-5 minutes
Fish, rolled fillets and slices 5-7 minutes
Fish, whole small, Smelt, Trout, Whitebait 2-7 minutes
Potatoes, Straws, Chips 3-4 minutes
Potatoes, French Fried 6-8 minutes

[Pg 243]


C.—TEMPERATURE TABLE

[Pg 244]

Fahrenheit
Freezing point 32°
Lukewarm Water or Milk, not over 98°
Albumen begins to coagulate 134°
Milk, Pasteurized, keep for ½ hour at 145°
Simmering point 185°
Boiling point, Water (sea level) 212°
Boiling point, Milk (sea level) 214°
Milk, scalded in double boiler 196°
Baking, Apples 300°
Baking, Bananas 400°
Baking, Biscuit (baking powder) 450°
Baking, Biscuit (yeast) 425°
Baking, Loaf Bread 400°
Baking, Muffins 380°
Baking, Popovers 450°
Baking, Cake: Cookies 400°
Baking, Cake: Gingerbread 375°
Baking, Cake: Fruit and Pound 300°
Baking, Cake: Layer 380°
Baking, Cake: Plain (shallow pan) 375°
Baking, Cake: Sponge (shallow pan) 350°
Baking, Meats, Beef and Mutton, for 15 minutes 450°
then reduce to 350°
Baking, Meats, Chicken and Turkey, for ½ hour 400°
then reduce to 300°
Baking, Meats, Goose and Lamb, for ½ hour 400°
then reduce to 300°
Baking, Meats, Pork and Veal, for ½ hour 350°
then reduce to 260°
Baking, Pastry: Pies, for ¼ hour 450°
then reduce to 350°
Baking, Pastry: Tart or Patty Shells 450°
Baking, Potatoes 450°
Frying:[14] Breaded Chops, Oysters 380°
Frying: Croquettes, Fishballs 390°
Frying: Doughnuts, Fritters 360°-370°
Frying: Potatoes, French Fried 380°
Frying: Potato Chips or Straws 400°
Fruit Jelly 222°
Sugar and Water Sirup, large thread 217°
Sugar and Water Sirup, feather 232°
Sugar and Water Sirup, soft ball 240°
Sugar and Water Sirup, hard ball 250°
Sugar and Water Sirup, for glacéd fruits and nuts 310°
Sugar and Water Sirup, for spun sugar 300°
Sugar and Water Sirup, caramel 350°
A very hot oven 450°-550°
A hot oven 400°-450°
A moderate oven 350°-400°
A slow oven 250°-350°

[Pg 245]


D.—TABLE OF CALORIC VALUES OF AVERAGE PORTIONS OF FOOD.

The following table gives the approximate number of calories and the approximate percentage of protein, fat, and carbohydrate in an average portion of food.[15] Unless otherwise stated an egg, orange, potato, etc., means one of average size.

Number of
Kind of Food Amount Calories % Protein % Fat % Carbohydrates
Beverages
Buttermilk (see Dairy Products)
Chocolate[16] 1 cup 200 10 49 41
Cocoa[17] 1 cup 140 14 39 47
Eggnog 1 cup 225 21 48 31
Grape Juice ½ cup 100 0 0 100
Milk (See Dairy Products)
Orange Juice ½ cup 50 0 0 100
Breads
Baking Powder Biscuit 1 small biscuit 50 11 27 62
Boston Brown Bread 1 slice ¾ in. x 3 in. diameter 100 10 10 80
White Bread 1 slice ½ in. x 4 in. x 2½ in. 50 14 6 80
Corn Bread 1 piece 2 in. x 2 in. x 1 in. 100 10 24 66
Crackers, Graham 1 50 9 20 71
Crackers, Soda 1 25 10 20 70
Croutons (fried) 12 half-in. cubes 80 7 49 44
Croutons (toasted) 12 half-in. cubes 45 14 4 82
Griddle Cakes 2 cakes 4½ in. in diameter 200 14 25 61
Muffins, Corn Meal 1 133 13 25 62
Muffins, One-egg 1 125 12 24 64
Popovers 1 100 18 27 55
Sandwich (Club) 1 500 15 69 16
Cake
Apple Sauce Cake slice ½ in. x 1½ in. x 3¾ in. 128 4 23 73
Doughnuts 1 200 6 45 49
Fruit Cake slice ½ in. x 2 in. x 4 in. 300 6 26 68
Hot Water Gingerbread 1 piece 2 in. x 2 in. x 2 in. 200 8 22 70
Hot Water Sponge Slice 1½ in. x 1½ in. x 2 in. 100 7 7 86
Macaroon 1 50 6 33 61
One-Egg Cake Slice ½ in. x 2 in. x 4 in. 225 8 32 60
Candy and Sugar
Bitter Chocolate 1 oz. 200 8 72 20
Chocolate Fudge 1 cubic inch 89 2 20 78
Sweet Milk Chocolate 1 oz. 143 7 58 35
Molasses 1 tablespoon 66 3 0 97
Sugar, Granulated 1 tablespoon 55 0 0 100
Sugar 1 full-sized lump 28 0 0 100
Cereals
Corn Flakes 1 cup 80 6 4 90
Corn Meal Mush ½ cup 75 10 5 85
Grape Nuts 1/3 cup 200 12 2 86
Macaroni (cooked) ¾ cup 75 15 2 83
Oatmeal (cooked) ½ cup 50 17 16 67
Rice (steamed) ½ cup 64 9 1 90
Shredded Wheat Biscuit 1 100 13 5 82
Wheat Meal Mush ½ cup 67 12 4 84
Cheese Dishes
Cheese Fondue ¾ cup 180 17 70 13
Welsh Rarebit ½ cup and 1 thin slice toast 350 22 57 21
Dairy Products
Butter 1 tablespoon 113 1 99 0
Buttermilk 1 cup 88 33 13 54
Cheese, American 1½ cubic inches 100 26 71 3
Cheese, Cottage 2 cubic inches 50 76 9 15
Cream, Thin ¼ cup 100 5 86 9
Milk, Unskimmed 1 cup 160 20 52 28
Milk, Skimmed 1 cup 88 37 7 56
Desserts
Brown Betty ½ cup 250 3 35 62
Chocolate Blancmange ½ cup 312 9 48 43
Cup Custard 1 custard 200 17 39 44
Lemon Jelly ½ cup 100 9 0 91
Pie, Apple 1 piece[18] 300 3 41 56
Pie, Custard 1 piece 256 9 32 59
Pie, Lemon Meringue 1 piece 367 5 27 68
Pie, Mince 1 piece 450 8 39 53
Pie, Raisin 1 piece 445 5 36 59
Pie, Squash 1 piece 360 10 25 65
Rice Custard ½ cup 100 18 32 50
Indian Tapioca ½ cup 400 11 20 69
Vanilla Ice Cream (custard) ½ cup 200 6 55 39
Eggs
Boiled 1 75 36 64 0
Scrambled 1/3 cup 133 20 76 4
Fats and Salad Dressings
Bacon fat 1 tablespoon 132 0 100 0
Beef Drippings 1 tablespoon 113 0 100 0
Butter (See Dairy Products)
Cream (See Dairy Products)
Crisco 1 tablespoon 134 0 100 0
Lard 1 tablespoon 132 0 100 0
Oleomargarine 1 tablespoon 113 1 99 0
Olive Oil 1 tablespoon 132 0 100 0
French Dressing 1 tablespoon 88 0 100 0
Mayonnaise Dressing 1 tablespoon 105 1 97 2
Cooked Dressing 1 tablespoon 25 10 64 26
Fruits
Apple, baked (with sugar) 1 large 200 1 3 96
Bananas 1 large 100 5 6 89
Cantaloupe ½ 50 6 0 94
Cranberry Sauce ¼ cup 100 0 1 99
Dates 1 25 2 7 91
Figs, dried 1 67 5 1 94
Grape Fruit 1 medium 100 7 4 89
Olives, Green 2 medium 30 1 83 16
Orange 1 large 100 6 3 91
Peach 1 40 7 2 91
Prunes, Stewed ¼ cup 200 2 0 98
Raisins ¼ cup 100 3 9 88
Meats and Fish (cooked)
Bacon 1 thin slice 25 13 87 0
Dried Beef (creamed) 1/3 cup 100 16 65 19
Hamburg Steak (broiled) cake 7/8 in. thick 2½ in. diameter 100 55 45 0
Roast Beef slice 5 in. x 2½ in. x ¼ in. 100 46 54 0
Stewed Beef with Dumpling 1 cup 290 14 24 62
Lamb Chops 1 kidney chop 125 24 76 0
Pork Chops 1 loin chop 200 18 82 0
Sausage 2 small 100 20 78 2
Clams (raw) 8 50 56 8 36
Codfish Balls 1, 2 inches in diameter 100 14 65 21
Creamed Codfish ½ cup 100 32 46 22
Oysters (raw) 6 50 49 22 29
Salmon (canned) ½ cup 100 45 55 0
Sauces
Brown Sauce 2 tablespoons 37 14 49 37
Lemon Sauce 2 tablespoons 70 0 30 70
Tomato Sauce 2 tablespoons 40 5 70 25
White Sauce 2 tablespoons 55 8 70 22
Soups
Bouillon ¾ cup 19 84 8 8
Cream of Corn ¾ cup 150 12 38 50
Corn Chowder ¾ cup 185 12 43 45
Split Pea ¾ cup 125 26 2 72
Tomato (canned) ¾ cup 100 12 12 76
Vegetables
Asparagus 7 stalks 33 32 8 60
Beans, Baked ¾ cup 225 21 18 61
Beans, Lima (fresh) ½ cup 100 23 5 72
Beans, String ½ cup 20 22 7 71
Beets 1 beet, 2 in. diameter 25 14 2 84
Corn (canned) ½ cup 150 11 11 78
Peas (canned) ½ cup 67 26 3 71
Potatoes, Mashed ½ cup 110 7 48 45
Potatoes, Sweet, Baked 1 200 6 5 89
Potatoes, White, Baked 1 100 11 1 88
Spinach ½ cup 20 12 8 80
Squash, winter ½ cup 55 9 7 84
Tomatoes (canned) ½ cup 30 12 8 71

[Pg 250]


E.—APPROXIMATE CALORIC VALUE OF RAW FOOD MATERIALS AND THE APPROXIMATE PERCENTAGE OF PROTEIN, FAT, AND CARBOHYDRATE.

By means of this table the fuel value of nearly all recipes may be computed.[19]

[Pg 252]

[Pg 251]

Number of
Material Quantity Calories % Protein % Fat % Carbohydrates
Cereals
Barley, Pearl 1 cup 755 10 3 87
Bran 1 cup 218 14 6 80
Bread Crumbs, dried 1 cup 373 14 4 82
Bread Crumbs, soft 1 cup 147 14 4 82
Corn Meal 1 cup 504 10 5 85
Corn Starch 1 cup 459 0 0 100
Flour, Graham 1 cup 508 15 6 79
Flour, White, sifted 1 cup 395 12 4 84
Macaroni, broken 1 cup 355 15 2 83
Oatmeal 1 cup 636 17 16 67
Rolled Oats 1 cup 280 17 16 67
Rice 1 cup 867 9 1 90
Chocolate, bitter 1 square 173 8 72 20
Cocoa, dry 1 cup 634 17 53 30
Crackers, Boston 1 pound 1885 13 9 78
Dairy Products
Butter, See Fats
Cheese, American (fresh) { 1 cup 498 } 26 71 3
{ 1 pound 1993 }
Condensed Milk, sweetened 1 cup 1067 11 23 66
Condensed Milk, unsweetened 1 cup 427 23 51 26
Skimmed Milk[20]
Whole Milk[21]
Cream[22]
Eggs[23]
Egg, White 1 14 97 3 0
Egg, Yolk 1 56 20 80 0
Fats
Butter { 1 cup 1802 } 1 99 0
{ 1 pound 3605 }
Crisco { 1 cup 2136 } 0 100 0
{ 1 pound 4273 }
Lard { 1 cup 2110 } 0 100 0
{ 1 pound 4220 }
Oleomargarine { 1 cup 1492 } 1 99 0
{ 1 pound 3410}
Olive Oil 1 cup 1600 0 100 0
Suet { 1 cup 749 } 3 97 0
{ 1 pound 3424 }
Fruits
Apricots, dried 1 pound 1260 7 3 90
Blackberries 1 cup 200 9 16 75
Concord Grapes 1 large bunch 100 5 15 80
Cranberries 1 cup 46 4 11 85
Currants, dried 1 cup 502 3 5 92
Dates, dried (unstoned) { 1 cup 508 } 2 7 91
{ 1 pound 1416 }
Figs, chopped { 1 cup 507 } 5 1 94
{ 1 pound 1437 }
Lemon Juice ½ cup 44 0 0 100
Pineapple (canned, grated) 1 cup 369 1 4 95
Other fruits[24]
Gelatine 1 ounce 106 100 0 0
Maple Sirup 1 cup 976 0 0 100
Meats and Fish (Edible portion)
Beef, Sirloin Steak 1 pound 1143 31 69 0
Beef, Round 1 pound 950 54 46 0
Beef, Tongue 1 pound 727 47 53 0
Chicken, young 1 pound 500 79 21 0
Clams, long 1 pint 240 56 8 36
Cod 1 pound 326 95 5 0
Fowl 1 pound 1050 35 65 0
Goose 1 pound 1818 16 84 0
Halibut 1 pound 571 61 39 0
Ham 1 pound 1940 29 71 0
Lamb, forequarter 1 pound 1430 25 75 0
Liver 1 pound 605 61 39 0
Lobster 1 pound 390 78 20 2
Mackerel 1 pound 645 50 50 0
Mutton, Leg 1 pound 1105 41 59 0
Oysters 1 pint 230 49 22 29
Salt Pork, fat 1 pound 3670 2 98 0
Shad 1 pound 762 46 54 0
Turkey Veal, Breast 1 pound 1333 29 71 0
Other Meats and Fish[25] 1 pound 840 47 53 0
Molasses 1 cup 976 3 0 97
Nuts (shelled)
Almonds 1 cup 734 13 76 11
Peanuts 1 cup 663 19 63 18
Peanut Butter 1/3 cup 640 19 69 12
Pecans 1 cup 1145 5 87 8
Walnuts, English 1 cup 600 11 82 7
Sugar
Brown 1 cup 625 0 0 100
Granulated 1 cup 840 0 0 100
Powdered 1 cup 672 0 0 100
Vegetables
Beans, dried 1 cup 684 26 5 69
Beans, Lima, dried 1 cup 541 21 4 75
Cabbage 1 pound 145 20 9 71
Carrots 1 pound 210 10 5 85
Celery (cut in ¼-inch pieces) 1 cup 24 24 5 71
Corn, canned 1 cup 255 11 11 78
Lentils (dried) 1 cup 640 29 3 68
Lettuce 1 large head 50 25 14 61
Mushrooms 1 pound 211 31 8 61
Onions { 1 onion 25 } 13 6 81
{ 1 pound 225 }
Parsnips 1 pound 291 10 7 83
Peas, canned (drained) 1 cup 134 26 3 71
Peas, dried 1 cup 675 28 3 69
Tapioca 1 cup 640 0 0 100
Tomatoes, fresh 1 pound 100 21 8 71
Tomatoes, canned 1 cup 60 21 8 71
Turnip 1 cup ½-inch cubes 50 13 5 82
Other Vegetables[26]

[Pg 253]


F.—NORMAL WEIGHTS FOR MEN AND WOMEN[27]

WHAT MEN SHOULD WEIGH

Ages: 15-24 25-29 30-34 35-39 40-44 45-49 50-54 55-59 60-64
5 ft. 0 in. 120 125 128 131 133 134 134 134 131
5 ft. 1 in. 122 126 129 131 134 136 136 136 134
5 ft. 2 in. 124 128 131 133 136 138 138 138 137
5 ft. 3 in. 127 131 134 136 139 141 141 141 140
5 ft. 4 in. 131 135 138 140 143 144 145 145 144
5 ft. 5 in. 134 138 141 143 146 147 149 149 148
5 ft. 6 in. 138 142 145 147 150 151 153 153 153
5 ft. 7 in. 142 147 150 152 155 156 158 158 158
5 ft. 8 in. 146 151 154 157 160 161 163 163 163
5 ft. 9 in. 150 155 159 162 165 166 167 168 168
5 ft. 10 in. 154 159 164 167 170 171 172 173 174
5 ft. 11 in. 159 164 169 173 175 177 177 178 180
6 ft. 0 in. 165 170 175 179 180 183 182 183 185
6 ft. 1 in. 170 177 181 185 186 189 188 189 189
6 ft. 2 in. 176 184 188 192 194 196 194 194 192

WHAT WOMEN SHOULD WEIGH

Ages: 15-19 20-24 25-29 30-34 35-39 40-44 45-49 50-54 55-59 60-64
4 ft. 11 in. 111 113 115 117 119 122 125 128 128 126
5 ft. 0 in. 113 114 117 119 122 125 128 130 131 129
5 ft. 1 in. 115 116 118 121 124 128 131 133 134 132
5 ft. 2 in. 117 118 120 123 127 132 134 137 137 136
5 ft. 3 in. 120 122 124 127 131 135 138 141 141 140
5 ft. 4 in. 123 125 127 130 134 138 142 145 145 144
5 ft. 5 in. 125 128 131 135 139 143 147 149 149 148
5 ft. 6 in. 128 132 135 139 143 146 151 153 153 152
5 ft. 7 in. 132 135 139 143 147 150 154 157 157 155
5 ft. 8 in. 136 140 143 147 151 155 158 161 161 160
5 ft. 9 in. 140 144 147 151 155 159 163 166 166 165
5 ft. 10 in. 144 147 151 155 159 163 167 170 170 169
5 ft. 11 in. 149 153 155 158 162 166 170 174 174 172
6 ft. 0 in. 154 157 159 162 165 169 173 177 177 175

[Pg 254]


G.—LIST OF GOVERNMENT PUBLICATIONS ON FOODS AND COOKING[28]

[Pg 255]

Beans, Peas, and other Legumes as Food Farmers' Bulletin, 121
Bread and Bread Making Farmers' Bulletin, 389
Canned Fruit, Preserves, and Jellies Farmers' Bulletin, 203
Canning Tomatoes; Home and Club Work Farmers' Bulletin, 521
Canning Vegetables in the Home Farmers' Bulletin, 359
Care of Food in the Home Farmers' Bulletin, 375
Cereal Breakfast Foods Farmers' Bulletin, 249
Cheese; Economical Uses in the Home Farmers' Bulletin, 487
Chemical Composition of American Food Materials Experiment Stations Bulletin, 28
Corn Meal as a Food and Ways of Using It Farmers' Bulletin, 565
Eggs and Their Uses as Food Farmers' Bulletin, 128
Fireless Cooker, Hay Box, or Farmers' Bulletin, 296
Fish as Food Farmers' Bulletin, 85
Food for Young Children Farmers' Bulletin, 717
Food Customs and Diet in American Homes Experiment Stations Circular, 110
Fruit, Use of, as Food Farmers' Bulletin, 293
Functions and Uses of Food Experiment Stations Circular, 46
Grape Juice, Unfermented, Manufacture and Use of Farmers' Bulletin, 644
Honey and Its Uses in the Home Farmers' Bulletin, 653
Household Equipment, Selection of Department of Agriculture Year Book, 1914
Measurements for the Household Standards Circular, 55
Meat: Economical Use of in the Home Farmers' Bulletin, 391
Meats: Composition and Cooking Farmers' Bulletin, 34
Milk, The Care of and Its Use in the Home Farmers' Bulletin, 413
Milk, The Uses of as Food Farmers' Bulletin, 363
Mushrooms and Other Common Fungi Agriculture Bulletin, 175
Mushrooms, Preserving Wild Farmers' Bulletin, 342
Nutrition of Man in U. S., Investigation on Experiment Stations Office
Nutrition, Principles of, and Nutritive Value of Food Farmers' Bulletin, 142
Nuts and Their Use as Food Farmers' Bulletin, 332
Olive Oil and Its Substitution Chemistry Bulletin, 77
Oysters: The Food that has not "Gone Up" Department of Commerce, Bureau of Fisheries, Economic Circular No. 18
Peanut Oil Farmers' Bulletin, 751
Popcorn for Home Use Farmers' Bulletin, 553
Raisins, Figs, and Other Dried Fruits, and Their Use Agriculture Year Book, 1912; Separate, 610
Sugar as Food Farmers' Bulletin, 93
Vegetables, Preparation of, for the Table Farmers' Bulletin, 256

INDEX

NO. PAGE
30 After-dinner Coffee 25
241 Almonds, Salted 97
180 Anchovy Sauce 80
Appetizers and Relishes
2     Asheville Canapés 17
11     Cantaloupe Cocktail 19
8     Celery Relish 19
9     Cheese and Apple Rings 19
3     Club Canapés 17
1     Cocktail Sauce 17
3     Crab Meat Canapés 18
17     Cucumber Pickles 21
12     Fruit Cocktail 19
6     Gloucester Canapés 18
5     Mock Crab Canapés 18
18     Pepper Hash 22
14     Piccalilli 20
19     Pickled Nasturtium Seeds 22
10     Spanish Cheese 19
15     Table Sauce 20
16     Tomato Ketchup 21
7     Tuna Canapés 18
13     Winter Chili Sauce 20
442 Apple and Cranberry Shortcake 160
366 Apple and Mint Salad 135
539 Apple Cake, Dutch 189
508 Apple Cake, Ginger 180
9 Apple, Cheese and, Rings 19
529 Apple Filling 186
325 Apple Fritters 123
540 Apple Pudding, Steamed 190
538 Apple Roulettes 189
490 Apple Sauce Cake 174
659 Apples, Baked with Dates 224
693 Apricot Paste 234
2 Asheville Canapés 17
34 Asparagus Soup 27


162 Bacon and Chicken Livers 72
163 Bacon and Lamb's Liver, Fried 73
151 Bacon, Breakfast 69
426 Bacon Sandwich Rolls 154
36 Baked Bean Soup 28
448 Baked Bean and Lettuce Sandwiches 163
351 Baked Bean Salad 130
247 Baked Beans 100
546 Baked Indian Pudding 191
674 Baked Pears 228
678 Baked Rhubarb and Bananas 229
555 Baked Rice Custard 194
556 Baked Rice Pudding 194
Baking defined 15
Baking Powder 10
397 Baking Powder 146
424 Baking Powder Biscuit 154
367 Banana and Apple Salad 135
560 Banana and Grape Juice Jelly 196
368 Banana and Peanut Salad 135
326 Banana Fritters 123
558 Banana Royal 196
181 Banana Sauce 80
443 Banana Shortcake 161
541 Banana Toast 190
559 Banana Whip 196
664 Bananas, Baked 225
665 Bananas with Figs and Nuts 226
666 Bar-le-Duc Currants, Mock 226
398 Barley Bread 146
248 Beans, Black, Thick Purée of 100
35 Beans, Black, Purée of 27
37 Beans, Red Kidney, Purée of 28
440 Beaten Biscuit, Maryland 158
182 Bechamel Sauce 80
134 Beef, American Chop Suey 62
130 Beef and Bacon Cakes 61
128 Beef, Broiled Chopped 60
126 Beef, Broiled Flank Steak 60
132 Beef, Casserole of 62
120 Beef, Corned 57
173 Beef, Corned, Hash 76
170 Beef, Corned, Scalloped 75
133 Beef, Creamed Dried, with Cheese 62
129 Beef, Hamburg Meat Cakes 61
131 Beef, Loaf 61
122 Beef, Pot Roast 58
119 Beef, Pressed 57
121 Beef, Roast 58
169 Beef, Savory 75
123 Beef, Shin of, with Creole Sauce 59
127 Beef Steak, Country Style 60
70 Beef Stew 40
124 Beef, Stuffed Shin 59
369 Bellevue Salad 135
Beverages
31     Café au Lait 26
33     Chocolate 26
32     Cocoa 26
30     Coffee, After-dinner 25
20     Coffee, Egg, and Milk 23
29     Coffee, Filtered 25
24     Ginger Ale Punch 24
23     Ginger Punch 24
22     Grape Eggnog 23
21     Grape Juice 23
25     Mint Julep (Ginger Ale) 24
26     Mint Lemonade 24
27     Tea 25
28     Tea, Iced 25
424 Biscuit, Baking Powder 154
440 Biscuit, Beaten, Maryland 158
430 Biscuit, Entire Wheat 155
431 Biscuit, Fruit Tea 156
432 Biscuit, Graham 156
429 Biscuit, Quick Drop 155
183 Black Butter 81
56 Blackberry Mold 197
542 Blackberry Pudding 190
563 Blancmange, Chocolate 197
578 Blancmange, Sea Moss 202
412 Blueberry Muffins 151
630 Blueberry Pie 216
543 Blueberry Pudding 190
212 Boiled Eggs 88
521 Boiled Icing 184
Boiling defined 15
686 Bonbon Centers 233
50 Bouillon, Tomato 32
Braising defined 15
399 Bran Bread (Baking Powder) 146
378 Bran Bread (Yeast) 138
510 Bran Drop Cookies 180
413 Bran Muffins 151
Bread 9
Bread, Baking Powder
398     Barley 146
399     Bran 146
403     Brown, Bread Crumb 148
428     Coffee Cake, Quick 155
405     Corn 148
409     Corn Cake, Custard 150
411     Corn Cake, Rhode Island 150
406     Corn, Country 149
401     Dark Nut 147
400     Date 147
404     Indian Date, Steamed 148
410     Molasses Corn 150
402     Quick Raisin 147
Bread, Yeast
378     Bran 138
387     Buns 14
388     Crescents 142
380     Date 139
379     Entire Wheat 139
381     Fried 139
382     Graham and Corn 140
383     Irish 140
384     Oatmeal 140
396     Roulettes 145
385     Rye 141
386     Shredded Wheat 141
377     White 138
403 Bread Crumb Brown Bread 148
217 Bread Omelet 90
184 Bread Sauce 81
471 Bread, Stale to freshen 168
208 Bread Stuffing 86
439 Breakfast Puffs 158
460 Brews 165
Broiling defined 15
544 Brown Betty 190
403 Brown Bread, Bread Crumb 148
461 Brown Bread Toast 165
185 Brown Sauce 81
486 Brown Sugar Sirup 172
387 Buns 141
Butter 5
472 Buttered Crumbs 168
422 Buttermilk Muffins 153


353 Cabbage and Beet Salad 131
354 Cabbage and Cranberry 131
250 Cabbage Baked 101
251 Cabbage Cooked in Milk 101
31 Café au Lait 26
Cake 10
Cake
490     Apple Sauce 174
491     Canada War 174
503     Charlotte Russe 178
504     Chocolate Marshmallow Roll 179
502     Cream Pie 178
492     Date 175
493     Fudge 175
508     Ginger Apple 180
506     Gingerbread, with Egg 179
505     Gingerbread, without Egg 179
507     Gingerbread, Sour Milk 180
509     Ginger Gems 180
503     Jelly Roll 178
494     Old-Fashioned Pork 175
495     One-Egg 176
496     Orange 176
497     Plain 176
498     Spice 177
500     Sponge 177
501     Velvet Sponge 178
499     White 177
Caloric Value, Tables of 245, 250
Calorie defined 2
Calories, Daily Requirement 2
414 Cambridge Muffins 151
491 Canada War Cake 174
2 Canapés, Asheville 17
3 Canapés, Club 17
4 Canapés, Crab Meat 18
6 Canapés, Gloucester 18
5 Canapés, Mock Crab 18
7 Canapés, Tuna 18
673 Candied Grape Fruit Peel 228
Candies 11
Candies
693     Apricot Paste 234
686     Bonbon Centers 233
688     Chocolate Bonbons 233
687     Fondant Bonbons 233
685     Fondant, Coffee 232
689     Fondant, Mint 233
684     Fondant, Plain 232
690     Fondant, Quick 233
696     Fruit Wafers 236
700     Marrons Glacés 237
694     Mint Paste 235
692     Mints, After-dinner 234
691     Mints, Quick 234
701     Nuts and Fruits Glacé 237
697     Spiced Raisins 236
698     Stuffed Dates 236
699     Stuffed Prunes 236
695     Turkish Delight 235
Candle Stubs 12
Canned Vegetables 8
11 Cantaloupe Cocktail 19
590 Canton Ginger Sherbet 206
186 Caper Sauce 81
522 Caramel Icing 184
601 Caramel Sauce 209
547 Caramel Toast Pudding 191
Carbohydrates 1
Carbohydrates, Uses 1
Carbohydrates, Sources 1
Carbohydrates, Daily Requirement 1
256 Carrots Sautéed 103
257 Carrots Vinaigrette 103
39 Cauliflower 28
449 Celery and Egg Sandwiches 163
252 Celery, Braised 102
40 Celery, Cream of 29
245 Celery, Nut, and Potato Loaf 98
8 Celery Relish 19
253 Celery Root, Creamed 102
355 Celery Root Salad 131
187 Celery Sauce 82
462 Celery Toast 166
Cereals 8
308     Corn Meal and Beef Scrapple 117
293     Corn Meal Mush 113
294     Hominy, Steamed 113
295     Macaroni and Cheese, Scalloped 113
297     Noodle Balls (for Soup) 114
296     Noodle Paste 114
298     Oatmeal, Scotch 114
301     Polenta, French Fried 115
302     Polenta, Spanish 116
299     Polenta with Cheese 115
300     Polenta with Dates 115
305     Rice and Cocoanut Loaf 117
303     Rice and Ham, Baked 116
304     Rice, Boiled 116
306     Risotto 117
307     Samp, Steamed 117
310     Spaghetti and Ham, Baked 118
311     Spaghetti, Creole 118
312     Spaghetti, Italian 119
309     Wheat and Sausage Scrapple 118
503 Charlotte Russe, Cake for 178
562 Charlotte Russe Filling 197
Cheese 7
9 Cheese and Apple Rings 19
450 Cheese and Nut Sandwiches 163
237 Cheese, Baked Rice with 96
317 Cheese Balls 120
451 Cheese Club Sandwiches 163
234 Cheese, Cottage 96
235 Cheese, Crackers and, Baked 96
318 Cheese Croquettes 121
231 Cheese Croustades 95
232 Cheese Custard 95
511 Cheese Drops 181
233 Cheese Fondue 95
415 Cheese Muffins 151
236 Cheese Paste 96
188 Cheese Sauce 82
189 Cheese Sauce with Chives 82
238 Cheese, Scalloped, Toast and 97
42 Cheese Soup 29
10 Cheese, Spanish 19
654 Cheese Straws 223
655 Cheese Straws (Left-over Paste) 223
465 Cheese Toast 167
239 Cheese Tomato Rarebit 97
656 Cheese Wafers 223
512 Cheese Wafers 181
240 Cheese Welsh Rarebit 97
631 Cherry Pie 217
632 Cherry Pie, Mock 217
244 Chestnuts, Baked 98
243 Chestnuts, to Shell 98
56 Chicken and Okra Soup 35
55 Chicken, Cream of 35
162 Chicken Livers and Bacon 72
345 Chicken Salad 129
452 Chicken Sandwiches 164
13 Chili Sauce, Winter 20
33 Chocolate 26
563 Chocolate Blancmange 197
688 Chocolate Bonbons 233
513 Chocolate Cookies 181
581 Chocolate Ice Cream 203
523 Chocolate Icing 184
504 Chocolate Marshmallow Roll 179
603 Chocolate Marshmallow, Sauce 209
602 Chocolate Sauce 209
Chowders
75     Clam 43
76     Corn 43
77     Corn and Tomato 44
78     Fish 44
79     Oyster 45
80     Potato 45
81     Salmon 45
82     Salt Fish 46
83     Vegetable 46
591 Cider Frappé 206
190 Cider Sauce 82
487 Cider Sirup 173
Cinders 13
657 Cinnamon Hearts 223
604 Cinnamon Sauce 210
466 Cinnamon Toast 167
57 Clam Bisque 36
58 Clam Bouillon 36
75 Clam Chowder 43
59 Clear Soup 36
3 Club Canapés 17
12 Cocktail, Fruit 19
11 Cocktail, Cantaloupe 19
1 Cocktail Sauce 17
32 Cocoa 26
582 Cocoa Ice Cream 204
524 Cocoa Icing 185
564 Coconut and Orange Jelly 198
113 Codfish, Creamed 55
118 Codfish, Spanish 56
84 Cod Steaks, Baked 47
30 Coffee, After-dinner 25
569 Coffee and Rice Jelly 199
428 Coffee Cake, Quick 155
565 Coffee Caramel Custards 198
530 Coffee Cream Filling 186
20 Coffee, Egg, and Milk 23
29 Coffee, Filtered 25
583 Coffee Ice Cream 204
525 Coffee Icing 185
566 Coffee Junket 198
605 Coffee Sauce 210
Coloring 10
Condiments 12
Cookies
510     Bran Drop 180
511     Cheese Drops 181
512     Cheese Wafers 181
513     Chocolate 181
514     Ginger Wafers 182
517     Macaroons, Oatmeal 182
518     Macaroons, Peanut 183
515     Marshmallow Wafers 182
516     Molasses Brownies 182
519     Raisin Drop 183
520     Walnut Wafers 183
Cooking, Kinds of, defined 15
Cooking Fats 6
Cooking, Time Tables for 240
77 Corn and Tomato Chowder 44
406 Corn Bread, Country 149
410 Corn Bread, Molasses 150
405 Corn Bread, without Eggs 148
409 Corn Cake, Custard 150
411 Corn Cake, Rhode Island 150
76 Corn Chowder 43
41 Corn, Cream of 29
327 Corn Fritters 123
308 Corn Meal and Beef Scrapple 117
478 Corn Meal Griddle Cakes 170
293 Corn Meal Mush 113
425 Corn Meal Rolls 154
483 Corn Meal Waffles 172
407 Corn Muffins 149
393 Corn Muffins, Raised 144
254 Corn Pudding 102
408 Corn and Rice Muffins 149
346 Coronado Salad 129
234 Cottage Cheese 96
549 Cottage Pudding 192
5 Crab Canapés, Mock 18
4 Crab Meat Canapés 18
235 Crackers and Cheese, Baked 96
668 Cranberry Conserve 226
328 Cranberry Fritters 124
416 Cranberry Muffins 152
633 Cranberry Pie 217
634 Cranberry Pie (Open) 217
545 Cranberry Pudding, Baked 191
671 Cranberry Sauce 227
606 Cranberry Sauce (Pudding) 210
592 Cranberry Sherbet 206
567 Cranberry Whip 199
Cream 6
370 Cream Cheese Salad 136
371 Cream Cheese Salad, Frozen 136
40 Cream of Celery Soup 29
55 Cream of Chicken Soup 35
41 Cream of Corn Soup 29
46 Cream of Pea Soup 31
531 Cream Filling 186
526 Cream Icing 185
502 Cream Pie 178
463 Cream Toast 166
464 Cream Toast, Sauce for 166
96 Creamed Fish 50
213 Creamy Eggs on Toast 88
218 Creamy Omelet 90
214 Creole Eggs 89
191 Creole Sauce 83
388 Crescents 142
475 Crisp Sticks 169
Croquettes
192 Croquette Sauce 83
318     Cheese 121
317     Cheese Balls 120
319     Fish 121
320     Meat 121
321     Potato and Bean 122
322     Rice 122
323     Rice and Raisin 122
324     Salmon and Potato 122
473 Croustades 168
231 Croustades, Cheese 95
474 Croutons 169
417 Crumb Muffins 152
472 Crumbs, Buttered 168
315 Crumbs for Fried Food 120
209 Crust Stuffing 87
17 Cucumber Pickles 21
193 Cucumber Sauce 83
255 Cucumbers Sautéed 103
608 Currant Jelly Sauce 210
555 Custard, Baked Rice 194
232 Custard, Cheese 95
565 Custard, Coffee Caramel 198
635 Custard Pie 218
607 Custard Sauce 210


663 Dark Red Apple Sauce 225
444 Date and Apple Shortcake 161
532 Date and Fig Filling 186
380 Date Bread 139
400 Date Bread 147
404 Date Bread, Steamed 148
492 Date Cake 175
394 Date Muffins, Raised 144
418 Date Muffins 152
427 Date Rolls 154
609 Date Sauce 211
Desserts, Cold
558     Banana Royal 196
559     Banana Whip 196
560     Banana and Grape Juice Jelly 196
561     Blackberry Mold 197
562     Charlotte Russe Filling 197
563     Chocolate Blancmange 197
564     Coconut and Orange Jelly 198
569     Coffee and Rice Jelly 199
565     Coffee Caramel Custards 198
566     Coffee Junket 198
567     Cranberry Whip 199
568     Custard, Soft 199
570     Fruit Cream 199
571     Fruit Jelly, Spiced 200
572     Fruit Whip 200
573     Pineapple Pudding 200
575     Prune and Wheat Mold 201
574     Prune Whip 200
576     Prunes and Cranberries, Jellied 201
577     Rice Mold 202
578     Sea Moss Blancmange 202
Desserts, Frozen
579     Ices, to Freeze 203
590     Canton Ginger Sherbet 206
581     Chocolate Ice Cream 203
591     Cider Frappé 206
582     Cocoa Ice Cream 204
583     Coffee Ice Cream 204
592     Cranberry and Raisin Sherbet 206
580     Frozen Custard 203
600     Frozen Watermelon 208
593     Fruit Sherbet 206
594     Grape Bombe 207
595     Grape Sherbet 207
596     Jelly Sherbet 207
584     Mint Ice Cream 204
585     Orange Velvet Cream 204
586     Philadelphia Ice Cream 205
597     Pineapple Sherbet 207
587     Prune Ice Cream 205
598     Somerset Sherbet 208
588     Strawberry Ice Cream 205
599     Strawberry Sherbet 208
589     Vanilla Ice Cream 205
Desserts, Hot
539     Apple Cake, Dutch 189
508     Apple Cake, Ginger 180
540     Apple Pudding, Steamed 190
538     Apple Roulettes 189
541     Banana Toast 190
542     Blackberry Pudding 190
543     Blueberry Pudding 190
544     Brown Betty 190
547     Caramel Toast Pudding 191
548     Chocolate Pudding, Steamed 192
549     Cottage Pudding 192
545     Cranberry Pudding, Baked 191
550     Fig Pudding, Steamed 192
551     Fruit Pudding, Steamed 193
546     Indian Pudding, Baked 191
553     Indian Tapioca Pudding 194
552     Mock Indian Pudding 193
557     Mulled Rice 195
554     Peach Dumplings 194
555     Rice Custard, Baked 194
556     Rice Pudding, Baked 194
331 Doughnuts 125
332 Doughnuts, Small Tea 125
471 Doughnuts, Stale, to Freshen 168
194 Drawn Butter 83
479 Dried Crumb Griddle Cakes 171
658 Dried Fruit to cook 224
38 Dried Lima Bean Soup 28
429 Drop Biscuit, Quick 155
Dry Steaming defined 16
72 Dumplings 41
554 Dumplings, Peach 194
356 Dutch Potato Salad 132


Economy, General Suggestions for. See Chapter I 1
22 Eggnog 23
Eggs 6
Eggs, see also Omelets 90
212     Boiled 88
213     Creamy, on Toast 88
214     Creole 89
316     Egg for Dipping Fried Food 120
224     Scalloped, with Cheese 92
225     Scrambled, with Sausages 93
226     Scrambled, with Tomatoes 93
227     Shirred 93
228     Shirred, with Ham 93
230     Shirred, with Potato and Ham 94
229     Souffléed, with Ham Toast 94
215     with Cheese and Spaghetti 89
216     with Ham and Tomatoes 89
258 Egg Plant, Baked 103
259 Egg Plant, Fried 103
260 Egg Plant, Julienne 104
195 Egg Sauce 84
430 Entire Wheat Biscuit 155
379 Entire Wheat Bread 139
437 Entire Wheat Popovers 158
Extracts, flavoring 10


Fat 5
Fat, Temperatures for Frying 244
313 Fat, To Clarify 120
314 Fat, To Try Out 120
Fats as Food, Chief Uses 1
Fats as Food, Chief Sources 1
Fats as Food, Daily Requirement 1
Fats as Food, Cooking 6
672 Fig Paste 227
Fillings
529     Apple 186
530     Coffee Cream 186
531     Cream 186
532     Date and Fig 186
533     Fudge 187
534     Marshmallow 187
535     Mocha 187
536     Orange 187
537     Prune 188
29 Filtered Coffee 25
105 Finnan Haddie, Baked in Milk 53
109 Finnan Haddie, Broiled 54
Fireless Cooker 13
Fish 5
Fish,
84     Cod Steaks, Baked 47
113     Creamed Codfish 55
96     Creamed 50
105     Finnan Haddie, Baked 53
109     Finnan Haddie, Broiled 54
87     Flounder, Fried Fillet 48
103     Fried Scallops 52
85     Haddock, Baked Stuffed 47
86     Halibut, Boiled 47
106     Herring, Baked 53
111     Herring, Broiled 54
107     Mackerel, Baked Salt, Spiced 53
92     Oyster Pie, Creamed 49
94     Oyster Pie Shortcake 50
93     Oysters and Macaroni 49
89     Oysters, Broiled 48
91     Oysters, Creamed 49
95     Oysters, Panned 50
90     Oysters, with Brown Sauce 48
102     Salmon and Peas, Soufflé 52
112     Salmon, Broiled Smoked 54
99     Salmon, Creole 51
100     Salmon, Dutch 51
101     Salmon Loaf 52
108     Salt Codfish Baked with Crackers 54
110     Salt Codfish, Broiled 54
117     Salt Codfish, Soufflé 56
88     Sautéed with Salt Pork 48
104     Shrimps and Rice, Louisiana 53
118     Spanish Codfish 56
98     Timbales 51
    Warmed over 50
97 Fish and Potato Pie 50
115 Fish Balls 55
114 Fish Cakes with Pork Scraps 55
78 Fish Chowder 44
319 Fish Croquettes 121
116 Fish Hash 56
210 Fish Stuffing 87
Flavoring Extracts 10
87 Flounder, Fried Fillet of 48
687 Fondant Bonbons 233
685 Fondant, Coffee 224
689 Fondant Mints 233
684 Fondant, Plain 232
690 Fondant, Quick 233
233 Fondue, Cheese 95
Food Classified 1
Food Daily Requirement 2
Food Government Publications 254
140 Fowl, Brown Fricassee 64
220 French Cheese Omelet 91
338 French Dressing 127
301 French Fried Potatoes 115
219 French Omelet 90
467 French Toast 167
Fricasseeing defined 15
381 Fried Bread 139
Fritters
325     Apple, Sliced 123
326     Banana 123
327     Corn 123
328     Cranberry 124
329     Rice and Currant 124
330     Salmon 124
580 Frozen Custard 203
Fruit
663     Apple Sauce, Dark Red 225
659     Baked Apples, with Dates 224
664     Baked Bananas 225
674     Baked Pears 228
678     Baked Rhubarb and Bananas 229
665     Bananas, with Figs and Nuts 226
666     Bar-le-Duc Currants, Mock 226
673     Candied Grape Fruit Peel 228
668     Cranberry Conserve 226
671     Cranberry Sauce 227
658     Dried, to Cook 224
672     Fig Paste, Laxative 227
660     Grape and Apple Jelly 224
662     Grape and Apple Sauce 225
682     Jam, Red Tomato 230
675     Marmalade, Pear and Ginger 228
680     Marmalade, Rhubarb and Fig 230
679     Marmalade, Rhubarb and Orange 229
681     Marmalade, Three in One 230
670     Preserved Cranberries 227
677     Quince Honey 229
667     Red Currant Conserve 226
661     Spiced Apple Jelly 225
669     Spiced Cranberries 227
676     Spiced Prunes 229
683     Watermelon Rind, Sweet Pickled 231
12 Fruit Cocktail 19
570 Fruit Cream 199
610 Fruit Sauce 211
593 Fruit Sherbet 206
43 Fruit Soup 30
431 Fruit Tea Biscuit 156
696 Fruit Wafers 236
572 Fruit Whip 200
Fruits 10
Frying defined 15
493 Fudge Cake 175
533 Fudge Filling 187
Fuel 13


Garnishings 12
Gas 13
17 Gherkins 21
453 Giblet Sandwiches 164
24 Ginger Ale Punch 24
508 Ginger Apple Cake 180
509 Ginger Gems 180
23 Ginger Punch 24
611 Ginger Sauce 211
514 Ginger Wafers 182
507 Gingerbread, Sour Milk 180
506 Gingerbread, with Egg 179
505 Gingerbread, without Egg 179
6 Gloucester Canapés 18
468 Goldenrod Ham Toast 167
648 Gooseberry Patties 221
636 Gooseberry Pie 218
Government Publications on Food 254
382 Graham and Corn Bread 140
432 Graham Biscuit 156
438 Graham Popovers 158
594 Grape Bombe 207
22 Grape Eggnog 23
21 Grape Juice 23
662 Grape Juice and Apple Sauce 225
595 Grape Sherbet 207
Griddle Cakes
478     Corn Meal 170
479     Dried Crumb 171
476     Plain 170
481     Raised Buckwheat 171
480     Rice 171
477     Sour Milk 170
Grilling defined 15
Groceries 5


85 Haddock, Baked Stuffed 47
86 Halibut, Boiled 47
454 Ham and Cheese Sandwiches 164
171 Ham and Potato, Baked 76
153 Ham, Baked Sliced 69
152 Ham, Broiled 69
172 Ham Mousse 76
221 Ham Omelet 91
129 Hamburg Meat Cakes 61
612 Hard Sauce 211
173 Hash, Corned Beef, with Beets 76
116 Hash, Fish 56
18 Hash, Pepper 22
174 Hash, Savory, Baked 77
175 Hash, Southern 77
292 Hash, Vegetable 112
106 Herring, Baked 53
111 Herring, Smoked Broiled 54
196 Hollandaise Sauce 84
294 Hominy, Steamed 113
677 Honey, Quince 229
197 Horseradish Sauce 84


28 Iced Tea 25
Ices, See Frozen Deserts
Icings
521     Boiled 184
522     Caramel 184
523     Chocolate 184
524     Cocoa 185
525     Coffee 185
526     Cream 185
527     Orange 185
528     Quick 185
553 Indian Tapioca Pudding 194
383 Irish Bread 140
71 Irish Stew with Dumplings 40


682 Jam, Red Tomato 230
333 Jam Cakes, Fried 125
433 Jam Rolls 156
576 Jellied Prunes and Cranberries 201
Jelly
560     Banana and Grape 196
564     Coconut and Orange 198
569     Coffee and Rice 199
660     Grape and Apple 224
661     Spiced Apple 225
571     Spiced Fruit 200
503 Jelly Roll, Cake for 178
596 Jelly Sherbet 207
60 Julienne Soup 37


16 Ketchup Tomato 21
165 Kidneys, Devilled 73
164 Kidneys in Brown Sauce 73
Kitchen Equipment 12


73 Lamb Broth with Spaghetti 41
135 Lamb, Brown Fricassee 63
136 Lamb, Casserole of 63
137 Lamb Chops 63
138 Lamb Cutlets 64
139 Lamb, Rolled Roast 64
357 Leek Salad 132
261 Leeks, Creamed 104
Left-over Vegetables 8
637 Lemon Pie 218
613 Lemon Sauce 211
488 Lemon Sirup 173
26 Lemonade, Mint 24
222 Light Omelet 91
249 Lima Bean Loaf 101
38 Lima Bean Soup, Dried 28
163 Liver, Lamb's, and Bacon 73
160 Liver, Braised 72
161 Liver, Brown Fricassee 72
176 Liver Patties 77
131 Loaf, Beef 61
245 Loaf, Celery, Nut, and Potato 98
154 Loaf, Ham 69
249 Loaf, Lima Bean 101
246 Loaf, Nut 99
305 Loaf, Rice and Coconut 117
101 Loaf, Salmon 52
157 Loaf, Veal, Baked 70
158 Loaf, Veal, Boiled 71


Macaroni 8
295 Macaroni and Cheese, Scalloped 113
93 Macaroni, Oysters and 49
517 Macaroons, Oatmeal 182
518 Macaroons, Peanut 183
107 Mackerel, Baked Salt (Spiced) 53
Marketing 3
638 Marlborough Pie 218
675 Marmalade, Pear and Ginger 228
681 Marmalade, Three in One 230
700 Marrons Glacés 237
534 Marshmallow Filling 187
455 Marshmallow Sandwiches 164
614 Marshmallow Sauce 212
515 Marshmallow Wafers 182
339 Mayonnaise Dressing 127
Meals, Planning 1
Meat 3
347 Meat and Potato Salad 129
320 Meat Croquettes 121
Meats
134     American Chop Suey 62
171     Baked Ham and Potato 76
153     Baked Sliced Ham 69
130     Beef and Bacon Cakes 61
131     Beef Loaf 61
160     Braised Liver 72
151     Breakfast Bacon 69
128     Broiled Chopped Beef 60
126     Broiled Flank Steak 60
152     Broiled Ham 69
140     Brown Fricassee of Fowl 64
135     Brown Fricassee of Lamb 63
161     Brown Fricassee of Liver 72
132     Casserole of Beef 62
136     Casserole of Lamb 63
145     Casserole of Rabbit and Okra 67
162     Chicken Livers and Bacon 72
142     Chicken Pie 65
173     Corned Beef Hash with Beets 76
144     Country Club Rabbit 66
133     Creamed Dried Beef with Cheese 62
165     Devilled Kidneys 73
163     Fried Lamb's Liver and Bacon 73
154     Ham Loaf 69
172     Ham Mousse 76
129     Hamburg Meat Cakes 61
137     Lamb Chops 63
138     Lamb Cutlets 64
164     Lambs' Kidneys in Brown Sauce 73
176     Liver Patties 77
179     Meat Shortcake 79
178     Meat Soufflé 78
177     Meat and Tomato Pie 78
147     Pork Chops 68
122     Pot Roast of Beef 58
159     Potted Head 71
143     Potted Pigeons 66
119     Pressed Beef 57
120     Pressed Corn Beef 57
121     Roast Beef 58
155     Roast Breast of Veal 70
141     Roast Fowl 65
146     Roast Pork 67
139     Rolled Roast of Lamb 64
148     Sausage Cakes 68
149     Sausage Cakes with Apple 68
150     Sausage with Oysters and Eggs 68
169     Savory Beef 75
174     Savory Hash (Baked) 77
170     Scalloped Corned Beef 75
123     Shin of Beef, Creole Sauce 59
175     Southern Hash 77
166     Spanish Tripe 74
125     Steak, to Broil 59
127     Steak, Country Style 60
124     Stuffed Shin of Beef 59
167     Tripe Fried in Batter 74
168     Tripe Fried in Crumbs 74
157     Veal Loaf, Baked 70
158     Veal Loaf, Boiled 71
156     Veal with Vegetables 70
627 Meringue for Tarts and Pies 216
628 Meringue, One-Egg 216
Milk 6
20 Milk, Coffee, Egg, and 23
624 Mince Meat 215
625 Mince Meat, Mock 215
626 Mince Meat, Green Tomato 215
639 Mince Pie 219
25 Mint Julep (Ginger Ale) 24
26 Mint Lemonade 24
584 Mint Ice Cream 204
694 Mint Paste 235
198 Mint Sauce 84
692 Mints, After-dinner 234
691 Mints, Quick 234
535 Mocha Filling 187
615 Mocha Sauce 212
666 Mock Bar-le-Duc Currants 226
632 Mock Cherry Pie 217
5 Mock Crab Canapés 18
456 Mock Crab Sandwiches 164
552 Mock Indian Pudding 193
61 Mock Turtle Soup 37
Moist Steaming defined 16
516 Molasses Brownies 182
Muffins, Baking Powder
412     Blueberry 151
413     Bran 151
422     Buttermilk 153
414     Cambridge 151
415     Cheese 151
407     Corn 149
408     Corn and Rice 149
416     Cranberry 152
417     Crumb 152
418     Date 152
419     Plain 152
420     Rye 153
423     Sally Lunn 153
421     Sour Milk 153
Muffins, Yeast
392     Raised 143
393     Raised Corn 144
394     Raised Date 144
395     Raised Oatmeal 144
471 Muffins, Stale, to Freshen 168
557 Mulled Rice 195
199 Mushroom Sauce 84
62 Mushroom Soup 37
459 Mustard Butter 165
200 Mustard Pickle Sauce 85


19 Nasturtium Seeds, Pickled 22
297 Noodle Balls (for Soup) 114
296 Noodle Paste 114
Noodles 8
Normal Weights for Men and Women, Table of 253
401 Nut Bread, Dark 147
Nuts
241     Almonds, Salted 97
245     Celery, Nut, and Potato Loaf 98
244     Chestnuts, Baked 98
243     Chestnuts, to Shell 98
246     Loaf 99
700     Marrons Glacés 237
701     Nuts and Fruits Glacé 237
242     Peanut Butter 98


298 Oatmeal, Scotch 114
384 Oatmeal Bread 140
517 Oatmeal Macaroons 182
395 Oatmeal Muffins, Raised 144
44 Oatmeal Soup 30
484 Oatmeal Waffles 172
Oleomargarine 6
Omelets
217     Bread 90
218     Creamy 90
219     French 90
220     French Cheese 91
221     Ham 91
222     Light 91
223     Salmon 92
495 One-Egg Cake 176
352 Onion Salad 131
63 Onion Soup 38
363 Onion, Spanish, and Tomato Salad 134
262 Onions in Potato Nests 104
373 Orange and Cress Salad 136
496 Orange Cake 176
536 Orange Filling 187
527 Orange Icing 185
616 Orange Marmalade Sauce 212
201 Orange Mint Sauce 85
640 Orange Pie 219
489 Orange Sirup 173
585 Orange Velvet Cream 204
79 Oyster Chowder 45
92 Oyster Pie, Creamed 49
282 Oyster Plant, Creamed 109
94 Oyster Shortcake 50
64 Oyster Stew 38
65 Oyster and Celery Bouillon 38
93 Oysters and Macaroni 49
89 Oysters, Broiled 48
91 Oysters, Creamed 49
95 Oysters, Panned 50
90 Oysters with Brown Sauce 48


Pan-Baking defined 15
Pan-Broiling defined 15
95 Panned Oysters 50
389 Parker House Rolls 142
Pastry
629     Apple Pie, Sliced 216
647     Banbury Tarts 221
630     Blueberry Pie 216
654     Cheese Straws 223
655     Cheese Straws (Left-over Paste) 223
656     Cheese Wafers 223
631     Cherry Pie 217
632     Cherry Pie, Mock 217
657     Cinnamon Hearts 223
633     Cranberry Pie 217
634     Cranberry Pie (Open) 217
635     Custard Pie 218
648     Gooseberry Patties 221
636     Gooseberry Pie 218
637     Lemon Pie 218
638     Marlborough Pie 218
639     Mince Pie 219
640     Orange Pie 219
621     Patty Shells 214
622     Pie Shell 214
641     Pineapple Pie 219
619     Plain Paste 213
649     Prune and Apple Tart 221
650     Prune Patties 222
642     Prune Pie 220
643     Pumpkin Pie 220
644     Raisin Pie 220
651     Raspberry Pie (Individual) 222
645     Rhubarb Pie 220
652     Rhubarb Meringue Patties 222
620     Rich Paste 213
653     Squash Patties 222
646     Squash Pie 221
623     Tart Shells 214
46 Pea Soup, Cream of 31
47 Peas, Purée of Split 31
554 Peach Dumplings 194
242 Peanut Butter 98
518 Peanut Macaroons 183
457 Peanut Sandwich Filling 165
211 Peanut Stuffing 87
374 Pear Salad 137
264 Peas and Lettuce 105
263 Peas, Green 104
358 Pepper and Cabbage Salad 132
18 Pepper Hash 22
265 Peppers, Stuffed Green 105
586 Philadelphia Ice Cream 205
14 Piccalilli 20
19 Pickled Nasturtium Seeds 22
17 Pickles, Cucumber 21
Pie. See Pastry
142 Pie, Chicken 65
97 Pie, Fish and Potato 50
177 Pie, Meat and Tomato 78
627 Pie, Meringue for 216
92 Pie, Oyster 49
622 Pie Shell 214
143 Pigeons, Potted 66
376 Pineapple and Cottage Cheese Salad 137
375 Pineapple, Cheese, and Date Salad 137
641 Pineapple Pie 219
573 Pineapple Pudding 200
597 Pineapple Sherbet 207
497 Plain Cake 176
419 Plain Muffins 152
619 Plain Paste 213
Planning Meals 1
301 Polenta, French Fried 115
302 Polenta, Spanish 116
299 Polenta with Cheese 115
300 Polenta with Dates 115
436 Popovers 157
437 Popovers, Entire Wheat 158
438 Popovers, Graham 158
494 Pork Cake 175
147 Pork Chops 68
146 Pork, Roast 67
321 Potato and Bean Croquettes 122
80 Potato Chowder 45
269 Potato Croutons 106
359 Potato Salad 132
45 Potato Soup 30
280 Potato, Sweet, Custard 109
267 Potatoes, Baked 106
266 Potatoes, Boiled 105
268 Potatoes, Creamed 106
270 Potatoes, French Fried 106
271 Potatoes, Hashed Brown 106
272 Potatoes, Lyonnaise 107
273 Potatoes, Pan-Roasted 107
274 Potatoes, Scalloped, with Cheese 107
275 Potatoes, Scalloped, with Peppers and Cheese 107
276 Potatoes, Stuffed, with Cheese and Bacon 108
277 Potatoes, Stuffed with Nuts and Bacon 108
278 Potatoes, Sweet, French Fried 108
279 Potatoes, Sweet, glazed 109
281 Potatoes, Sweet, stuffed 109
Pot-Roasting defined 15
159 Potted Head 71
670 Preserved Cranberries 227
Protein, Chief Uses 1
Protein, Chief Sources 1
Protein, Daily Requirement 1
445 Prune and Apple Shortcake 161
649 Prune and Apple Tart 221
575 Prune and Wheat Mold 201
537 Prune Filling 188
587 Prune Ice Cream 205
650 Prune Patties 222
642 Prune Pie 220
574 Prune Whip 200
Publications on Food, List of 254
542 Pudding, Blackberry 190
543 Pudding, Blueberry 190
544 Pudding, Brown Betty 190
547 Pudding, Caramel Toast 191
548 Pudding, Chocolate, Steamed 192
549 Pudding, Cottage 192
545 Pudding, Cranberry, Baked 191
550 Pudding, Fig, Steamed 192
551 Pudding, Fruit, Steamed 193
546 Pudding, Indian, Baked 191
553 Pudding, Indian Tapioca 194
552 Pudding, Mock Indian 193
573 Pudding, Pineapple 200
556 Pudding, Rice, Baked 194
439 Puffs, Breakfast 158
643 Pumpkin Pie 220
24 Punch, Ginger Ale 24
23 Punch, Ginger 24
35 Purée of Black Beans 27
37 Purée of Red Kidney Beans 28
47 Purée of Split Peas 31


528 Quick Icing 185
677 Quince Honey 229


145 Rabbit, Casserole of, and Okra 67
144 Rabbit, Country Club 66
481 Raised Buckwheat Cakes 171
393 Raised Corn Muffins 144
392 Raised Muffins 143
402 Raisin Bread 147
458 Raisin Bread and Cheese Sandwiches 165
519 Raisin Drop Cookies 183
644 Raisin Pie 220
239 Rarebit, Tomato 97
240 Rarebit, Welsh 97
651 Raspberry Pie, Individual 222
667 Red Currant Conserve 226
8 Relish, Celery 19
Relishes, See Appetizers and Relishes
680 Rhubarb and Fig Marmalade 230
679 Rhubarb and Orange Marmalade 229
652 Rhubarb Meringue Patties 222
645 Rhubarb Pie 220
Rice 8
305 Rice and Coconut Loaf 117
329 Rice and Currant Fritters 124
303 Rice and Ham, Baked 116
323 Rice and Raisin Croquettes 122
48 Rice and Tomato Soup 31
237 Rice Baked, with Cheese 96
304 Rice Boiled 116
322 Rice Croquettes 122
480 Rice Griddle Cakes 171
577 Rice Mold 202
557 Rice, Mulled 195
485 Rice Waffles 172
620 Rich Paste 213
9 Rings, Cheese and Apple 19
306 Risotto 117
Roasting defined 16
204 Roast Goose, Sauce for 85
204 Roast Pork, Sauce for 85
Rolls, Baking Powder
426     Bacon Sandwich 154
425     Corn Meal 154
427     Date 154
433     Jam 156
Rolls, Yeast
389     Parker House 142
390     Shamrock 143
471     Stale, to Freshen 168
391     Swedish Coffee 143
Roulettes
538     Apple 189
447     Cheese 162
447     Devilled Ham 162
447     Fruit 162
447     Marmalade 162
447     Peanut Butter 162
396     Raised 145
447     Raisin and Nut 162
341 Russian Dressing 128
385 Rye Bread 141
420 Rye Muffins 153


Salads 8
366     Apple and Mint 135
351     Baked Bean 130
367     Banana and Apple 135
368     Banana and Peanut 135
369     Bellevue 135
352     Bermuda Onion 131
353     Cabbage and Beet 131
354     Cabbage and Cranberry 131
355     Celery Root 131
345     Chicken 129
346     Coronado 129
370     Cream Cheese 136
371     Cream Cheese, Frozen 136
356     Dutch Potato 132
357     Leek 132
347     Meat and Potato 129
373     Orange and Cress 136
374     Pear 137
358     Pepper and Cabbage 132
375     Pineapple, Cheese, and Date 137
376     Pineapple and Cottage Cheese 137
359     Potato 132
348     Salmon 130
361     Samoset 133
349     Shrimp 130
362     Spanish 133
363     Spanish Onion and Tomato 134
360     Sweet Potato 133
364     Tomato Jelly 134
350     Tuna 130
365     Vegetable 134
372     Waldorf, Jellied 136
Salad Dressings 8
334     Cooked 126
335     Cooked, Evaporated Milk 126
336     Currant Jelly 127
337     Devilled Ham 127
338     French 127
339     Mayonnaise 127
340     Potato Mayonnaise 128
343     Quick Mayonnaise 128
341     Russian 128
342     Sour Cream 128
344     Uncooked, Condensed Milk 129
423 Sally Lunn 153
102 Salmon and Peas Soufflé 52
324 Salmon and Potato Croquettes 122
66 Salmon Bisque 39
81 Salmon Chowder 45
99 Salmon Creole 51
100 Salmon Dutch 51
330 Salmon Fritters 124
101 Salmon Loaf 52
223 Salmon Omelet 92
348 Salmon Salad 130
112 Salmon, Smoked Broiled 54
282 Salsify, Creamed 109
108 Salt Codfish Baked with Crackers 54
110 Salt Fish, Broiled 54
82 Salt Fish Chowder 46
117 Salt Fish Soufflé 56
361 Samoset Salad 133
307 Samp, Steamed 117
Sandwiches
448     Baked Bean and Lettuce 163
449     Celery and Egg 163
450     Cheese and Nut 163
451     Cheese Club 163
452     Chicken 164
453     Giblet 164
454     Ham and Cheese 164
455     Marshmallow 164
456     Mock Crab 164
458     Raisin Bread and Cheese 165
457 Sandwich Filling, Peanut 165
1 Sauce, Cocktail 17
Sauces for Desserts
601     Caramel 209
602     Chocolate 209
603     Chocolate Marshmallow 209
604     Cinnamon 210
605     Coffee 210
606     Cranberry 210
608     Currant Jelly 210
607     Custard 210
609     Date 211
610     Fruit 211
611     Ginger 211
612     Hard 211
613     Lemon 211
614     Marshmallow 212
615     Mocha 212
616     Orange Marmalade 212
617     Soft 212
618     Strawberry 212
Sauces for Fish and Meat
180     Anchovy 80
181     Banana 80
182     Bechamel 80
183     Black Butter 81
184     Bread 81
185     Brown 81
186     Caper 81
187     Celery 82
188     Cheese 82
189     Cheese with Chives 82
190     Cider 82
191     Creole 83
192     Croquette 83
193     Cucumber 83
194     Drawn Butter 83
195     Egg 84
196     Hollandaise 84
197     Horseradish 84
198     Mint 84
199     Mushroom 84
200     Mustard Pickle 85
201     Orange Mint 85
204     for Roast Goose 85
204     for Roast Pork 85
205     Sharp 86
206     Soubise 86
15     Table 20
202     Tartare 85
203     Tomato 85
207     White 86
13     Winter Chili 20
148 Sausage Cakes 68
149 Sausage Cakes Baked with Apple 68
150 Sausages with Oysters and Eggs 68
Sautéing defined 16
224 Scalloped Eggs with Cheese 92
238 Scalloped Toast and Cheese 97
103 Scallops, Fried 52
434 Scones, Potato 157
435 Scones, Scotch 157
298 Scotch Oatmeal 114
74 Scotch Broth 41
225 Scrambled Eggs with Sausages 93
226 Scrambled Eggs with Tomato 93
308 Scrapple, Corn Meal and Beef 117
309 Scrapple, Wheat, and Sausage 118
578 Sea Moss Blancmange 202
227 Shirred Eggs 93
228 Shirred Eggs with Ham 93
230 Shirred Eggs with Potato and Ham 94
Shortcakes
441     Shortcake 160
442     Apple and Cranberry 160
443     Banana 161
444     Date and Apple 161
179     Meat 79
94     Oyster 50
445     Prune and Apple 161
446     Strawberry 161
Shortening 5
386 Shredded Wheat Bread 141
349 Shrimp Salad 130
104 Shrimps and Rice, Louisiana 53
Simmering defined 16
Sirups
486     Brown Sugar 172